Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Still in the learning process on new to me LeBlond Lathe

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • #16
    try this site for a manual of your lathe: https://onedrive.live.com/?cid=547FE...ECFD561F%21164 (it has dozens of other manuals on it also, actually a valuable resource) Jim

    Comment


    • #17
      Originally posted by rogee07 View Post
      OK, found the hidden neutral
      In years of use you will likely discover another half dozen handle positions that disengage the spindle drive, some will no doubt prove annoying at best (-:

      Comment


      • #18
        Originally posted by Bented View Post

        In years of use you will likely discover another half dozen handle positions that disengage the spindle drive, some will no doubt prove annoying at best (-:
        Sorta like the transmission in my old truck. Move the shift lever around a bit and find that it's connected to a whole box full of neutrals! 😄

        Comment


        • #19
          On the Burnerd chucks the adjusters (3) move the scroll.

          Geoff

          Comment


          • #20
            "On the Burnerd chucks the adjusters (3) move the scroll."

            Geoff

            If the scrolls can be adjusted independent of on another, by three of the set screws, then would it not be possible for me to regrind the jaws, which are in poor condition, in a mill. Seem that this would be easier than trying to grind them in place. Can I presume, on my chuck the one dog end set screw that I thought was missing, actually was not serving as an adjustment screw, but served another purpose. Maybe it was it just capping a hole that could be used for oiling the chuck.

            Every bit of new info adds more questions

            Thank you Geoff

            Comment


            • #21
              In re reading the post by Geoff I see that I mistakenly thought be said that you could independently adjust the scrolls. Now I see that he said that the three screws adjusted the scroll. So I can forget about grinding the jaws in the mill.

              Comment


              • #22
                Originally posted by tom_d View Post

                Sorta like the transmission in my old truck. Move the shift lever around a bit and find that it's connected to a whole box full of neutrals! 😄
                Not related but.....
                I have a Spicer 5 speed in my one fire truck,
                and I have acquired a Spicer Auxiliary box
                that is under-direct-over. So 5+3.
                I can't wait to get it installed.
                Oh yea, lots of neutrals.

                -Doozer
                DZER

                Comment


                • #23
                  Originally posted by rogee07 View Post
                  "On the Burnerd chucks the adjusters (3) move the scroll."

                  Geoff

                  If the scrolls can be adjusted independent of on another, by three of the set screws, then would it not be possible for me to regrind the jaws, which are in poor condition, in a mill. Seem that this would be easier than trying to grind them in place. Can I presume, on my chuck the one dog end set screw that I thought was missing, actually was not serving as an adjustment screw, but served another purpose. Maybe it was it just capping a hole that could be used for oiling the chuck.

                  Every bit of new info adds more questions

                  Thank you Geoff
                  Some chucks have threaded holes for eyebolts that facilitate hoist lifting. This one has threaded holes in the T-slots so we made a hoist ring. I also made a simple lifting device for removing the gap.

                  Last edited by Bented; 09-29-2020, 06:01 PM.

                  Comment


                  • #24
                    Re the 3 adjusters - each one has a tapered section that meets the scroll at a tangent so you have to back off two of them before moving the one required to "push" the scroll into alignment. Then snug up the loose ones after the jaws are true.

                    Re the grinding - first make a jig to pre-load the jaws against the scroll (plenty of examples on the web). I need to do this as my 4" Burnerd chuck (aged 52) has a hint of bell-mouthing. I recently did this on a smaller Bison and was amazed at the improvement. I made the jig to load the jaws at 3/8" diam. since it does mostly small stock.

                    Good luck.

                    Geoff

                    Comment


                    • #25
                      I think I have another problem with this Chuck. When I removed the three Set screws None of the three had a tapped front section. All thee were std. Dog point set screws of different lengths. I removed and cleaned up the three jaws, they had a bit of aluminum shavings and other crap almost welded to the rack teeth. After reinstalling the jaws the chuck opened and closed with little effort, very smooth.

                      Comment


                      • #26
                        I talked to customer service at Pratt Bernerd This morning, and found out that they actually make two types of three jaw chucks, with adjustable backing plates. One called a "set true" with 4 dog point set screws, the other called a "true grip" that used three tapered set screws. It turns out that mine is a "set true", that is missing one of the dog point set screws, which are not that difficult to find. I'm happy that This chuck turned out to be the "Set True" type as I am very comfortable with four jaw chucks, and the adjustment on this "set true" is an easy transition.

                        Keep the comments coming as I learn something new with each one.

                        Comment


                        • #27
                          Originally posted by Bented View Post

                          There is no "mechanism" per se, the set screws simply move the entire chuck on the spindle adapter in the same manner as moving the part with independent jaws..
                          Have added adjustable scroll chucks to existing lathes like so.

                          If necessary bore the back of the new chuck body.
                          Often the locating diameter on the spindle adapter is quite short and small.
                          Turn a ring that fits snugly on the original locating diameter yet is .025- .050" smaller then the chuck, the set screws will contact this rather then the adapter itself, they will bugger it up over time.
                          Assemble, adjust and turn at will.

                          Bented, I am puzzled by the labels in your drawing. Isn't that big lump on the right the chuck, not the spindle? Surely one wants the adjusting screws in the chuck body, not in the spindle body? Or am I missing something here?

                          The spindle on my lathe has a flange with a male register ("locating diameter"), just like the part labeled spindle adaptor on your drawing, which fits directly into a recess on the back of the chuck. But that chuck has about 6 thou run-out, which is beginning to irritate me. I am tempted to try and fix it. (Yes, I know I could use a four-jaw instead, but that's not the point.) The register is 95mm in diameter, but only 4mm thick. Rather than risk permanently damaging the chuck by boring its recess larger, I am wondering about making an adaptor with a 95mm diameter recess on the back and a (say) 94mm male register on the front. Is that feasible, do you think?

                          Comment


                          • #28
                            Correct, should be Chuck Body

                            Comment

                            Working...
                            X