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The pig in the poke turns out to Wild, a Wild Theodolite that is

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  • #16
    will it tram my LMS3990?

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    • #17
      Originally posted by eKretz View Post
      I just bought a used Wild T3000 recently for the cost of shipping. It was bought the same way yours was by a friend of mine.
      https://youtu.be/3NcIu0EF6lQ

      I bought mine thinking the kids could at least use it as a telescope - it's got almost 60x magnification at infinity focus. Getting it fixed and working was a bonus. Minimum focus distance is only about 18"-20". I'll be hanging onto mine.

      Click image for larger version Name:	t3000a.jpg Views:	0 Size:	234.8 KB ID:	1904104
      For the optics alone these are great units. Being digital, I heard that the encoders on these become delaminated with time, and the cost of repairs exceeds their value. Also, the electronics in them can die and be difficult to repair.

      GPS receivers have come way down in cost and their functionality and usability has improved a lot over the past 20 years. Not real good under tree canopies on in concrete jungles, but when properly used, and tied into existing geodetic control points, they have replaced older conventional survey tools. There is still a place for older transits and theodolites, but they are not as cherished as they were 40-50 years ago.

      A friend of mine gave me a 40 year old Wild T-1 a year ago, which I've used in locating and mapping my property, landscaping and buildings. I made an aluminum mount for one of the cheap laser distance meters, accurate up to 500 feet, mounted on top of it. It displays distances in feet and hundredths, very quick and easily, returning results from any reflective surface. It works better on 3M type reflective tape than on trees, stakes or buildings.

      It was just a fun little experiment, cheap and easy measurements, requiring hand logging of horizontal and vertical angles as well as distances, and bringing them all into a CAD drawing of my property, with one layer for an aerial photo, and having checks into existing corner monuments.

      Dan
      Last edited by Danl; 10-11-2020, 02:04 PM. Reason: Spill Chequer
      Salem, Oregon

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      • #18
        Originally posted by Danl View Post

        For the optics alone these are great units. Being digital, I heard that the encoders on these become delaminated with time, and the cost of repairs exceeds their value. Also, the electronics in them can die and be difficult to repair.

        GPS receivers have come way down in cost and their functionality and usability has improved a lot over the past 20 years. Not real good under tree canopies on in concrete jungles, but when properly used, and tied into existing geodetic control points, they have replaced older conventional survey tools. There is still a place for older transits and theodolites, but they are not as cherished as they were 40-50 years ago.

        A friend of mine gave me a 40 year old Wild T-1 a year ago, which I've used in locating and mapping my property, landscaping and buildings. I made an aluminum mount for one of the cheap laser distance meters, accurate up to 500 feet, mounted on top of it. It displays distances in feet and hundredths, very quick and easily, returning results from any reflective surface. It works better on 3M type reflective tape than on trees, stakes or buildings.

        It was just a fun little experiment, cheap and easy measurements, requiring hand logging of horizontal and vertical angles as well as distances, and bringing them all into a CAD drawing of my property, with one layer for an aerial photo, and having checks into existing corner monuments.

        Dan
        Yes the optics are outstanding, very clear. We've already used the telescope to view the moon, Jupiter and Saturn. When the atmosphere is clear, the moon looks awesome, Saturn's rings are clearly visible and Jupiter's striped colors can be made out. The planets are very visible and clear, though small.

        There are no delaminations possible on these encoders as far as I can see; the graduations are etched on rotating glass discs. The electronics have their foibles, but I managed to repair the few that mine had. I also found a legit service manual online that is pretty thorough. The main issue with my T3000 was a dead RAM battery, so it lost its calibration constants. Luckily there was a sticker in the battery compartment that had all of them listed, so all I had to do was desolder the dead battery and solder a new one in, then re-enter the constants. And also recalibrate all the others. Then adjust a few settings with the old oscilloscope. Luckily again, that was all laid out in the service manual.

        For me it's just a neat device and fancy telescope for the kiddos, not looking to make any money with it. Might use it on a few projects at some point. Took this photo through the eyepiece with my phone camera, gives an idea of how good the optics are.

        Click image for larger version

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        • #19
          I'm still trying to make sense of the title of this thread??

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          • #20
            My Dad had a Wild T2 that he picked up on a side trip to Switzerland while he was in the Navy in the 50s. We mostly used it as a builder's level. That was an incredible piece of Swiss precision engineering. I think my brother has it now. It was extremely sensitive. You'd have to be careful to shade it from the sun, because the warmth would drive the level vials off-scale in an instant. I see asking prices on eBay of a few hundred dollars. That's asking, but I am surprised it's even that high.

            The USGS in Menlo Park, CA, used to have glass cases full of Wild theodolites, all considered obsolete, including T4 astronomical theodolites. I suppose they are a bit like Swiss SIP jig borers: incredibly engineered, incredibly precise, incredibly expensive when new, and now nearly worthless.

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            • #21
              Originally posted by RB211 View Post
              I'm still trying to make sense of the title of this thread??
              I think it was supposed to read: "The pig in the poke turns out to *be* Wild, a Wild Theodolite that is" If the idiom "pig in a poke" is throwing you off, it refers to buying something uninspected or getting something unexpected. Usually not a good thing.

              Mcgyver, if you've got the room, my vote is to keep it. Or send it to me for safe keeping. But I'm a self-confessed packrat and hang on to all sorts of things with questionable utility.

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              • #22
                right, a poke is a low dark building, a sty. You buy a pig that's in a poke you can't really see what you are getting.
                in Toronto Ontario - where are you?

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                • #23
                  Originally posted by Mcgyver View Post
                  right, a poke is a low dark building, a sty. You buy a pig that's in a poke you can't really see what you are getting.
                  Interesting. I've always heard that a "poke" was a bag, derived from the French "poque".

                  I've also heard that the phrase has to do with a confidence scam where a farmer would sell a cat in a bag as a suckling pig but the buyer wasn't able to look in the bag without buying it first. Leading to both the phrase "a pig in a poke" and "letting the cat out of the bag" but this seems sort of apocryphal.

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                  • #24
                    Originally posted by Fasttrack View Post

                    Interesting. I've always heard that a "poke" was a bag, derived from the French "poque".
                    .
                    could be, I've been wrong before.....thought I read it somewhere, same idea though for the idiom
                    in Toronto Ontario - where are you?

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                    • #25
                      Originally posted by Fasttrack View Post
                      Interesting. I've always heard that a "poke" was a bag, derived from the French "poque".
                      Check out Robert Service's famous poem, "The Shooting of Dan McGrew".

                      Last line, IIRC, was "The woman that kissed him and--pinched his poke--was the lady known as Lou."

                      Poke being the small bag holding his gold dust.

                      -js

                      Edit: Here it is:
                      https://www.poetryfoundation.org/poe...-of-dan-mcgrew
                      Last edited by Jim Stewart; 10-16-2020, 07:31 PM.
                      There are no stupid questions. But there are lots of stupid answers. This is the internet.

                      Location: SF Bay Area

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                      • #26
                        I'm late to this party, but Wild (correctly said as "willed" or "villed") (now Leica division of Hexagon) offered autocollimating-telescope versions of the T-2, T-3, T-2000, T-3000, and the TM-5100 for industrial applications. In fact, there were two flavors of autocollimation used, "bright line" (aka "false autocollimation") that was built into the telescope eyepiece assembly), and "bright field" (aka "true autocollimation"), which could replace the eyepiece lens.

                        Of the two, the bright-line system was much, much user friendly, but because it contains a beam splitter, it effectively dimmed the telescope for use with finite targets.

                        Having used autocollimating theodolites in aerospace manufacturing since 1975, I love Wkld and Zeiss instruments . . . but consider the Kern DKM-2A and it's big sister, the DKM-3A the first princess and queen of their ball.

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                        • #27
                          Pig in a poke reminds me of National Lampoon's European Vacation....

                          http://basementrejects.com/wp-conten...lk-300x168.jpg

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                          • #28
                            eKretz --

                            The lamp cartridge on your theodolite's eyepiece is indicative of a bright-line autocollimation capability. I believe that all of those particular lamp cartridges have LED light sources, while earlier-model Wild lamp cartridges used screw-base incandescent lamps that were at one time commonplace flashlight bulbs.

                            To use your theodolite as an autocollimation instrument, the telescope must be focused to "optical infinity and -- it should go without saying, but is well worth saying -- the lamp must be turned on.

                            I'm in a bit of a time bind at the moment, but Ill be happy to try answering your questions on this, either on line or by private email. Probably the best way to contact me is by private message on PM

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                            • #29
                              Thanks John, I will absolutely get in touch regarding that. Will send you a message at PM.

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                              • #30
                                We used to use a transit to set fence posts in straight lines. They saved a lot of time and frustration. Now I use a rotating laser with a receiver. Much better.
                                Location: The Black Forest in Germany

                                How to become a millionaire: Start out with 10 million and take up machining as a hobby!

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