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  • Back in the day

    Kind of a follow-on to the favorite authors thread. I've been browsing through some old magazines- here's a few excerpts that made me smile.

    Radio Pocket- predicted for mens clothes by a prominent Chicago appliance dealer. Based on his stores' sales of transistor radios during the last world series, Sol Polk of Polk Brothers believes even womens clothing may have special little pockets designed for tiny personal radios. Radio Electronics 1959. Another was an ad for the 'Magneramic' phono cartridge capable of tracking from 2 grams to 20 grams. Nearby was a cartoon of strings of vinyl being peeled off a record by an 'enthusiastically' weighted tonearm.

    Radio Electronics July 1960- Russians test color tv. First test of color tv transmission in the Soviet Union have been announced. Experimental broadcasts were held in Leningrad through a closed-circuit system serving 12 sets. In the same issue- 'award winning all transistor tape recorder approaches ultimate in miniaturization'- 4 track stereo matchbox size. 2 x 3 x 6-1/4 inches, and weighing but a few pounds. It's a reel to reel. 'The completed machine opens a new world of rallies, concerts, movie sound effects and fun almost impossible to enter with heavy machinery'.

    Stromberg Carlson had a console stereo with two completely separate speaker cabinets floating inside 'to alleviate the effects of feedback from the record player'.

    Also 1959- automobile phono changer plays a stack of 14 45rpm records. Made by RCA for 1960 Plymouths and DeSotos.

    On PC boards 'we may have to learn to live with them'.

    Here's some rumors- from 1948- 'tv will destroy the radio industry' and 'tv will destroy the movie industry'. From 1955 'transistors will destroy the tube industry'. From 1959- 'Japanese imports will destroy our American standard of living'.

    Also from 1959- Geniac Computer Kit, and the Cosmotron miniature atom smasher.

    And let's not forget the chemicals- for servicing you'll need Tuner-Tonic, Hush, and Ever-Quiet. For soldering you'll need the Luger Gun.

    I seldom do anything within the scope of logical reason and calculated cost/benefit, etc- I'm following my passion-

  • #2
    In one of the British modeling magazines from back in the day, was reading the words of "LBSC" lamenting the coming dieselization of the railroads but was pretty confident the steam locomotives would stick around for a long time due to the diesels lack of reliability. If he lived long enough, I'm sure he would of killed himself after the destruction of the worlds railroads.

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    • #3
      Speaking of steam trains, it was a popular belief at the time of their inception that train travel would lead to hysteria.

      Lots of hysteria in the article linked to below.

      How steam trains drove Victorians to acts of madness


      A partial quote below.

      The newly invented steam train, traveling so fast and far were blamed for triggering dark desires in men, driving them to insane acts of violence.
      The rocking motion of the trains, and their incredible speed through the countryside was suspected for an outbreak of “railway madmen” attacking fellow passengers, and as with all new technologies, it was the technology to blame.





      Home, down in the valley behind the Red Angus
      Bad Decisions Make Good Stories​

      Location: British Columbia

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      • #4
        Originally posted by Willy View Post
        Speaking of steam trains, it was a popular belief at the time of their inception that train travel would lead to hysteria.

        Lots of hysteria in the article linked to below.

        How steam trains drove Victorians to acts of madness


        A partial quote below.







        Before 5G, it was Steam Trains!!

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        • #5
          What about dirigibles? It seemed like at least once a year Popular Mechanics and Mechanix Illustrated used to have cover story articles about revolutionary new dirigibles changing air travel.
          Sole proprietor of Acme Buggy Whips Ltd.
          Specialty products for beating dead horses.

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          • #6
            Originally posted by Beazld View Post
            What about dirigibles? It seemed like at least once a year Popular Mechanics and Mechanix Illustrated used to have cover story articles about revolutionary new dirigibles changing air travel.
            Likewise, I recall the near monthly cover stories in either of those magazines during the 1970's of the "revolutionary new engine" design that promised super efficiency and super low maintenance, emissions, etc.

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            • #7
              I was leafing through a digital version of the American Machinist periodical doing some research for something I was interested in, and I found the letters to the editors quite amusing. In one there was a whole thread of shop managers replying to each other debating the merits of high speed steel. I thought it was so humorous, because the arguments for or against were almost word for word the same arguments used by hobby machinists regarding carbide. "I can run 3x faster, I'm making money hand over fist!" "It's to fragile, this garbage will never catch on!". [Not exact quotes]

              110 years later and nothing has changed.
              21" Royersford Excelsior CamelBack Drillpress Restoration
              1943 Sidney 16x54 Lathe Restoration

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              • #8
                Originally posted by RB211 View Post

                Before 5G, it was Steam Trains!!
                Believe me, I was glad to see the steamers go. If you've never rode one through a long tunnel, and choked on the sulfurous miasmic stench, you've missed quite an experience.

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                • #9
                  Here's a piece of my city that's a requiem for 2 modes of transport. This is the Central Railroad of New Jersey Terminal in Jersey City for freight and passengers to NYC. That deep inlet on the right is the Hudson terminus of the Morris Canal: "The Morris Canal (1829–1924) was a 107-mile (172 km) common carrier coal canal across northern New Jersey in the United States that connected the two industrial canals at Easton, Pennsylvania, across the Delaware River from its western terminus at Phillipsburg, New Jersey, to New York Harbor"


                  Click image for larger version  Name:	image-asset.jpeg?format=1000w.jpg Views:	0 Size:	240.0 KB ID:	1904937

                  It's all now Liberty State Park, 1/2 of which is unusable by humans due to toxic waste from it's industrial history. Those remaining piers are where ferries depart to the Statue of Liberty and Ellis Island.

                  Click image for larger version  Name:	555805177.jpg Views:	0 Size:	214.0 KB ID:	1904939
                  Last edited by gellfex; 10-14-2020, 10:44 PM.
                  Location: Jersey City NJ USA

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                  • #10
                    My grandparents lived two blocks from a rail yard/switch yard that funneled down to a bridge across the Niagara River to Canada. There was a road bridge across the yard. We would get up on the bridge and hang over the side when the steam trains came under. Talk about soot !
                    One time we dropped a shopping cart off the side and down into the stack of a locomotive as it backed up to couple a load.
                    We laid pretty low for a while after that episode.
                    Last edited by Tim The Grim; 10-14-2020, 10:54 PM.
                    Illigitimi non Carborundum 😎
                    9X49 Birmingham Mill, Reid Model 2C Grinder, 13x40 ENCO GH Lathe, 6X18 Craftsman lathe, Sherline CNC mill, Eastwood TIG200 AC/DC and lots of stuff from 30+ years in the trade and 15.5 in refinery unit operations. Now retired. El Paso, TX

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                    • #11
                      Originally posted by Tim The Grim View Post
                      My grandparents lived two blocks from a rail yard/switch yard that funneled down to a bridge across the Niagara River to Canada. There was a road bridge across the yard. We would get up on the bridge and hang over the side when the steam trains came under. Talk about soot !
                      One time we dropped a shopping cart off the side and down into the stack of a locomotive as it backed up to couple a load.
                      We laid pretty low for a while after that episode.
                      That's not as bad as when a friends father, as a kid, put an empty baby stroller on the tracks and a train hit it. As he told the story, the engineer was traumatized. I'm not one to feel empathy, but I do for that poor engineer.

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                      • #12
                        Political correctness too........ I have a copy of a WWII era "Dieless Duplicating" published by Di Acro. It shows a variety of their bench tools, benders, etc, being used by women in a war production factory. The caption says "so simple to use even a girl could use them".

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