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OT - logsplitter motor/pump size

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  • #16
    Do you have logs that the 5HP splitter motor/pump can't split? Do you feel the need for faster motion on the ram? If the answer is no, just reseal or replace the pump with an identical one. If you can't push the splitter through the log, then the two stage pump can help as it get a higher pressure but slower motion. If you think you need a faster ram speed, then a bigger motor/pump combination is what you need. Now think about the safety of the faster ram and higher pressure generated by the two stage pump. Worth it?

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    • #17
      Originally posted by RMinMN View Post
      Do you have logs that the 5HP splitter motor/pump can't split? Do you feel the need for faster motion on the ram? If the answer is no, just reseal or replace the pump with an identical one. If you can't push the splitter through the log, then the two stage pump can help as it get a higher pressure but slower motion. If you think you need a faster ram speed, then a bigger motor/pump combination is what you need. Now think about the safety of the faster ram and higher pressure generated by the two stage pump. Worth it?
      On straight grained logs, no issues splitting. On, typically, maple with multiple crotches (in the same log piece) or seriously twisted grain from branches exiting the trunk, I have had to beat logs off of the wedge with a sledge hammer and try again from the opposite side of the log. Originally I thought of resealing the pump (probably could buy the seals for $30 with shipping) but for an expense of about $150+ I can get a 5 hp two stage pump and the ability to have a faster unloaded stroke is a benefit I would like to have. A few $ more for the 6.5 or 8 hp rated pump. My logsplitter has the basic spring loaded valve - unless one is actively engaging the lever, the cylinder does not actuate (no ability to engage the retract direction and let go of the lever and the cylinder continues to retract until it is completely retracted - I am OK with not having this feature).
      Metro Detroit

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      • #18
        Originally posted by aribert View Post

        On straight grained logs, no issues splitting. On, typically, maple with multiple crotches (in the same log piece) or seriously twisted grain from branches exiting the trunk, I have had to beat logs off of the wedge with a sledge hammer and try again from the opposite side of the log. Originally I thought of resealing the pump (probably could buy the seals for $30 with shipping) but for an expense of about $150+ I can get a 5 hp two stage pump and the ability to have a faster unloaded stroke is a benefit I would like to have. A few $ more for the 6.5 or 8 hp rated pump. My logsplitter has the basic spring loaded valve - unless one is actively engaging the lever, the cylinder does not actuate (no ability to engage the retract direction and let go of the lever and the cylinder continues to retract until it is completely retracted - I am OK with not having this feature).
        Put a pressure gauge on the oil line that extends the ram and see how much pressure the pump is making. Hold the lever to extend the ram to its full stroke and listen for the pressure relief valve while watching the gauge. Most likely that relief is built in to the spool valve. If it's not making its expected pressure then the pump could be worn or the relief valve could be out of adjustment. Do these checks first, before committing to a new pump.

        Having to bash the log off the wedge is not uncommon with the nasty stuff. Nothing like an afternoon workout trying to split a load of odd shaped elm.

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        • #19
          Originally posted by tom_d View Post


          Having to bash the log off the wedge is not uncommon with the nasty stuff. Nothing like an afternoon workout trying to split a load of odd shaped elm.
          Poplar species growing here is phenomenal. It is not particularly hard or strong wood but grain is totally interlocked. Needs a blade that is as large as the log diameter and full stroke from end to end..

          Location: Helsinki, Finland, Europe

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          • #20
            Originally posted by MattiJ View Post
            Poplar species growing here is phenomenal. It is not particularly hard or strong wood but grain is totally interlocked. Needs a blade that is as large as the log diameter and full stroke from end to end..
            Kind of a vicious cycle, isn't it. Need the wood for winter heat, yet winter can be the only time to split that stuff when, if there's enough moisture content, it's frozen solid and shatters apart, which might mean it's a little to wet to burn.

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