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Corrosion on mic anvil

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  • #16
    I hate to ask the obvious, but what happened to it?
    Sarge41

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    • #17
      I was thinking a patch of cloth or paper with Evapo-rust as well. Especially if the other anvil has a touch of corrosion as well.

      I'd never heard of or thought about the idea of using a bearing ball to test the faces. Another great tip!

      I'd add to that what I hope might be a slight help. Fit the bearing ball into a hole cut into some plastic, wood or soft metal so it can be gripped in a little helper vise and free up a hand to use for helping position the ball in different spots on the faces more easily.

      Chilliwack BC, Canada

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      • #18
        Originally posted by AD5MB View Post
        they made this comparison page: https://littlemachineshop.com/Info/minimill_compare.php which is why I bought this mill.

        send it back: there's a thought. re-crate it, wait a week for the truck to show up, wait two weeks for them to deliver it, wait a week while they do what they do, wait... thank you, no.

        I will try the big honking allen wrench in the chuck and a cheater bar
        Wrong thread

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        • #19
          https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=k5ywRufQOx8

          Oxtool has a vid on lapping micrometer faces. Probably beyond the home repair but a learning experience anyway.

          lg
          no neat sig line
          near Salem OR

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          • #20
            Dude, there are still starving people in Africa and they are cutting down the rain forests in South America.
            Problems.....Big to small here people. Not the other way around.!
            ----Snark comment, in case this thread would not be complete without it---

            -Doozer
            DZER

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            • #21
              Originally posted by BCRider View Post
              I'd add to that what I hope might be a slight help. Fit the bearing ball into a hole cut into some plastic, wood or soft metal so it can be gripped in a little helper vise and free up a hand to use for helping position the ball in different spots on the faces more easily.
              Starrett Micrometer Ball Attachment. Not hard to copy if you are so inclined.



              Click image for larger version

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              • #22
                The cost of that anvil is not very much. Depending on how much that mic is worth to you it could be sent to Starrett and they would replace it and make sure it's properly fitted and tested.

                I would call them.

                JL.............

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                • #23
                  Originally posted by sarge41 View Post
                  I hate to ask the obvious, but what happened to it?
                  Sarge41
                  Short answer: I dunno. Longer: I don't actually own the mic. It was one on eBay that I was considering, but the anvil's condition made me pause. In the end it sold for more than I wanted to pay.

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                  • #24
                    And that is exactly why using a ball is a good way to test it.



                    Originally posted by old mart View Post
                    With some rust pitting, the accuracy when measuring a bearing ball would depend whether you were unlucky enough to line up with a pit. The mic will be better used to measure flat surfaces.
                    Paul A.
                    SE Texas

                    Make it fit.
                    You can't win and there IS a penalty for trying!

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                    • #25
                      Yes, that is a good addition. Thanks for the thought.



                      Originally posted by BCRider View Post
                      I was thinking a patch of cloth or paper with Evapo-rust as well. Especially if the other anvil has a touch of corrosion as well.

                      I'd never heard of or thought about the idea of using a bearing ball to test the faces. Another great tip!

                      I'd add to that what I hope might be a slight help. Fit the bearing ball into a hole cut into some plastic, wood or soft metal so it can be gripped in a little helper vise and free up a hand to use for helping position the ball in different spots on the faces more easily.
                      Paul A.
                      SE Texas

                      Make it fit.
                      You can't win and there IS a penalty for trying!

                      Comment


                      • #26
                        Originally posted by pinstripe View Post

                        Starrett Micrometer Ball Attachment. Not hard to copy if you are so inclined.



                        Click image for larger version

Name:	apivk7yxc__50559.1591832604.jpg?c=2.jpg
Views:	55
Size:	73.2 KB
ID:	1905869
                        That's neat for when we want a ball anvil on one side for something special. But the use here was to use the ball to contact and check different spots on the face of the anvil for divots or any wedging due to the corrosion. My idea for holding the ball wasn't to fix it to the anvil but instead to hold the ball while we have two hands free to move the mic around to check different spots on the face using the ball as a "standard".

                        I've never seen a little adapter like that either.. I'm trying to think of some use where I'd want a ball contact point like that when using a mic. Applications?

                        Chilliwack BC, Canada

                        Comment


                        • #27
                          Originally posted by BCRider View Post
                          That's neat for when we want a ball anvil on one side for something special. But the use here was to use the ball to contact and check different spots on the face of the anvil for divots or any wedging due to the corrosion. My idea for holding the ball wasn't to fix it to the anvil but instead to hold the ball while we have two hands free to move the mic around to check different spots on the face using the ball as a "standard".
                          I see. I thought you wanted to keep it mounted in one spot. Yes, this would be useless for what you wanted.


                          Originally posted by BCRider View Post
                          I've never seen a little adapter like that either.. I'm trying to think of some use where I'd want a ball contact point like that when using a mic. Applications?
                          Internal diameters. For example, to measure pipe wall thickness. There are also smaller ball anvils to measure gear pitch diameters.

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                          • #28
                            Originally posted by BCRider View Post

                            That's neat for when we want a ball anvil on one side for something special. But the use here was to use the ball to contact and check different spots on the face of the anvil for divots or any wedging due to the corrosion. My idea for holding the ball wasn't to fix it to the anvil but instead to hold the ball while we have two hands free to move the mic around to check different spots on the face using the ball as a "standard".

                            I've never seen a little adapter like that either.. I'm trying to think of some use where I'd want a ball contact point like that when using a mic. Applications?
                            Then take a look at this Slocombe mic......round on both parts. Measures tubing thickness, or many non-flat things, from pipe to curved parts of many types, even lenses. The curvature just needs to be a larger radius than the ball ends. Works on flat items as well, of course.

                            1601 2137 5683 1002 1437

                            Keep eye on ball.
                            Hashim Khan

                            If you look closely at a digital signal, you find out it is really analog......

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