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New to me 1929 wide (heavy?) 9" long bed and overhead silent drive casting trade

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  • New to me 1929 wide (heavy?) 9" long bed and overhead silent drive casting trade

    hi all,

    I came across this SB wide 9 project a while ago while helping a "new to lathe work" guy set up his Clausing and last week he offered it to me for what he had in it as he has to move.

    Plus sides are it was a price I could afford (more or less) at $400, everything had been cleaned, it was a 55" bed and it will be a far more capable lathe than the unmentionable (begins with At and ends with 618) I've been using for the last 5 years or so.

    Down sides are that everything has been cleaned but not reassembled, it has some wear near the headstock (enough to catch a nail, haven't measured it yet), it came only with a 3 jaw chuck (no outside jaws) and no drive system. It originally shipped with an overhead silent chain drive, but I only have the main casting and nothing else (no plate or countershaft). I'll be making my own horizontal drive using some pillow block bearings, 1/2" alu plate and some poly-v pulleys.

    Here's the bed
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    Single tumbler gear box
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    Apron
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    Carriage, compound and a weird threaded but undrilled/ slotted face plate
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    Headstock and tailstock
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    and the overhead drive casting




    I won't be able to start putting it back together in earnest until I've finished my current project (mountainbike fork damper rebuild) as I need to get the space back in my garage and free up my current lathe.

    In the meantime - what to do with the overhead drive casting? Personally I'd prefer to trade it for stuff that I need (steady rest, 4 jaw chuck, 3 jaw chuck w/outside jaws, in that order) but would it be better to put it up on eBay and then use that money to buy what I need?

    Oh, serial number is 42149, which puts it as a 1929 or 1930 build.
    Last edited by mattthemuppet; 10-25-2020, 06:21 PM.

  • #2
    Have not seen one in a while, but I believe that bracket is for converting a flatbelt lineshaft driven lathe to individual motor and multispeed transmission, like a Turner Uni-drive, Cullman-Wheel, etc. Worth somethng to the right person.

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    • #3
      Should be a fun project, and nice that it has been all cleaned up for you. List the casting for sale or trade on as many sites as you can. You have time to be patient, and wait for the bite you need.
      “I know lots of people who are educated far beyond their intelligence”

      Lewis Grizzard

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      • #4


        Originally posted by reggie_obe View Post
        Have not seen one in a while, but I believe that bracket is for converting a flatbelt lineshaft driven lathe to individual motor and multispeed transmission, like a Turner Uni-drive, Cullman-Wheel, etc. Worth somethng to the right person.
        could well be reggie, I'm not an expert, but I think that they also came like that from the factory too. Here's what one looks like complete:
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        Originally posted by Dave C View Post
        Should be a fun project, and nice that it has been all cleaned up for you. List the casting for sale or trade on as many sites as you can. You have time to be patient, and wait for the bite you need.
        thanks Dave, I agree on both counts. Good advice on the overhead drive casting, I just have to find somewhere to stuff it that I won't either have to move to get to something or stub my toe on

        The funny thing is that many moons ago I found a 3 jaw chuck, FIMS QCTP and micrometer stop that would have fitted this lathe. As I had to move I ended up selling them. Bugger!
        Last edited by mattthemuppet; 10-18-2020, 04:03 PM.

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        • #5
          Matt, You brought a smile to my face 😀😀😀

          Originally posted by mattthemuppet View Post
          hi all,

          ......... Down sides are that everything has been cleaned but not reassembled, ................ I won't be able to start putting it back together in earnest until I've finished my current project ......................
          You don't normally hear about Tools not assembled. My first home shop Lathe and Mill were both real "Basket" cases
          The 6 " Atlas lathe was $ 100 and in pieces in 3 boxes and the Atlas Horz mill ( $ 125) was also in pieces and some pieces were actually in two Baskets ( Not the headstock)
          I had to clean, paint, reassemble and repair them before I could say I had a shop. I felt good at the time because there were about 1/2 the going price. The seller had lots of ideas but said he forgot how they went together ??
          Rich

          edit...the year was 1965
          Green Bay, WI

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          • #6
            [QUOTE=mattthemuppet;n1905607]



            could well be reggie, I'm not an expert, but I think that they also came like that from the factory too. Here's what one looks like complete:




            Matt, where did you get that Photo? I'm pretty sure that was restored by my friend Dennis. It's displayed in the lobby at Turk Manufacturing. Or at least it was, he's moved some machines out.

            I cut it off twice; it's still too short
            Oregon, USA

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            • #7
              Yes Tim you are right. It would be a way to continue to sell your flat belt machines, that weren't designed to be run by electric motor.

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              • #8
                Congrats on the latest edition to your family. Are cigars in order?

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                • #9
                  mattthemuppett, I don't think the casting you have is the one pictured with the overhead drive. The 'top' of yours doesn't seem to flare out that much, and I can't imagine that assembly being secured by one small bolt at the bottom. reggie_obe may be on to something in post #2.
                  Last edited by chipmaker4130; 10-18-2020, 06:44 PM.
                  Southwest Utah

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                  • #10
                    Tim, it was from http://www.lathes.co.uk/southbend9inchjunior/, there's no accreditation on the page though. I spent a bunch of time trying to figure out what I had and didn't have and that was one of the best series of photos I found.

                    Rich, yes, it'll be an adventure, that's for sure! It'll give me an opportunity to improve the oiling by adding ball oilers/ gits cups to the slide ways of the various assemblies, plus I'll definitely know more about how it all works by the end of it! Making the countershaft and motor mount will be an interesting challenge too. I'll be using a treadmill motor for variable speed and poly-v belts for both motor>countershaft and countershaft>spindle as they've worked really well for my Atlas.

                    tlfamm, well I haven't named it yet, but I'll toast it with a beer tonight! Not quite the same as the launch of the Queen Elizabeth but it'll do

                    A bit sad in a way, but this lathe is my memorial for my mum who died suddenly (she was 69) this April. My Dad sent us all some money for Christmas/ B'day/ consolation afterwards (sending presents from the UK is crazy expensive) and a bigger lathe is what I saved mine for. Not that I need any reason to remember her, but it'll give me that little bit extra pleasure to use it. My 6x26 mill was bought with money my uncle (her brother) left us when he died a few years ago, so I guess they're brother and sister in the garage now.

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                    • #11
                      oh, and here's the catalog for that year - pretty sure mine's the one on p.22
                      http://vintagemachinery.org/pubs/1617/18536.pdf

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                      • #12
                        From what I remember, the cast arm/bracket mounted with three bolts to the back of the bed. That particular lathe a 14" Hendey was donated to a museum after it had been cleaned up and was again in working order. Unfortunately it disappeared from the museum when the Governor de-funded it and several other public facilities.
                        Here's a different style of electric motor adapter: https://www.practicalmachinist.com/v...e-info-202633/
                        Here a good image as I remember it: https://www.practicalmachinist.com/v...light=unidrive

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                        • #13
                          dang, that's beefy. The South Bend catalog made the pitch that it was a turn key lathe package that occupied the same space as a line shaft machine and less than a horizontal drive set up. In that years catalog many of the lathes still came with line shaft countershaft assemblies.

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                          • #14
                            I dunno,,,,maybe just use the overhead motor bracket as is,,,,put a VFD & 3ph motor on it and run with it.
                            imagine putting the VFD out there in leiu of where the drum switch is in the pics,
                            I dunno,,, kinda old school yet new school at same time ???

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                            • #15
                              [QUOTE=mattthemuppet;n1905649]Tim, it was from http://www.lathes.co.uk/southbend9inchjunior/, there's no accreditation on the page though. I spent a bunch of time trying to figure out what I had and didn't have and that was one of the best series of photos I found.

                              Well, then, it's his. He has sent Tony quite a few photos over the years. Search "Dalton" at the same site to see more of his work.
                              I cut it off twice; it's still too short
                              Oregon, USA

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