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New to me 1929 wide (heavy?) 9" long bed and overhead silent drive casting trade

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  • #16
    Originally posted by Ringo View Post
    I dunno,,,,maybe just use the overhead motor bracket as is,,,,put a VFD & 3ph motor on it and run with it.
    imagine putting the VFD out there in leiu of where the drum switch is in the pics,
    I dunno,,, kinda old school yet new school at same time ???
    I'll see how much space I have for a rear drive vs. overhead. The space behind a lathe is kind of dead, whereas having a motor and mount a foot and a half above the lathe may restrict my access to the peg board on the wall. I'll be using a treadmill motor via a countershaft. I have all the bits (ie. free) and I've done a bunch before and like it. Unless someone has a 3ph motor and VFD they want to donate?

    Originally posted by Tim Clarke View Post

    Well, then, it's his. He has sent Tony quite a few photos over the years. Search "Dalton" at the same site to see more of his work.
    that's very cool, pass on my compliments whenever you see him, that's some beautiful work!

    Comment


    • #17

      Some updates:

      Cleaned all the old oil and grease out of the leadscrew
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      and wirebrushed the paint off the rim and peg of the carriage handwheel. This isn't going to be a show queen by any stretch, but painted handwheels look the pits. Gave it a rub with Mothers and a coating of oil to stop it rusting while I'm waiting. It'll get covered in oil as soon as I start using the lathe

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      stripped, cleaned and regreased/ oiled the Cushman chuck. Seemed pretty light, with some wear at the very tips of the grooves on the back of the scroll (pinion?).
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      Apron worm housing and key had a bunch of wear, which allowed the worm to move back and forth in the housing and a large degree of rotation on the lead screw. Knocked out the pin, unscrewed the collar and saw the reason for the longitudinal slop - a groove worn by the collar.
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      Put it on the lathe (didn't trust my vise on the mill) and turned off the worn area plus a little bit extra. Reassembled the worm and measured the gap with feeler gauges to figure out the thickness of the washer I needed to make.


      All the parts. Added new felt too..


      Made a new leadscrew key out of O1 ground stock, that just happened to be almost exactly the right size. Fits nicely now with no slop.

      new vs. old key


      finished up the apron. Cleaned out all the oil passages, put in new felts in those and the cross feed and rack gear shafts. Had to make a new nut for the rack gear shaft as I could find one in the collection of parts. Turned out ok, although the thread depth is a little shallow as I screwed up when boring it out (misread my drill chart). Bit ****** at myself about that, not that it really matters.


      apron all together



      bit of wear on the worm gear and half nuts, but not too bad, especially for a 90 year old machine.

      Have to think what to do next - tail stock or carriage. I'm going to be doing Halligan's tailstock travel mod, so I might get stuck into that first. Plus I have to wait to get the compound screw+bracket and gear cover from the previous owner.
      Last edited by mattthemuppet; 10-25-2020, 06:25 PM.

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      • #18
        Originally posted by mattthemuppet View Post
        Some updates:

        Cleaned all the old oil and grease out of the leadscrew


        and wirebrushed the paint off the rim and peg of the carriage handwheel. This isn't going to be a show queen by any stretch, but painted handwheels look the pits. Gave it a rub with Mothers and a coating of oil to stop it rusting while I'm waiting. It'll get covered in oil as soon as I start using the lathe



        stripped, cleaned and regreased/ oiled the Cushman chuck. Seemed pretty light, with some wear at the very tips of the grooves on the back of the scroll (pinion?).



        Apron worm housing and key had a bunch of wear, which allowed the worm to move back and forth in the housing and a large degree of rotation on the lead screw. Knocked out the pin, unscrewed the collar and saw the reason for the longitudinal slop - a groove worn by the collar.


        Put it on the lathe (didn't trust my vise on the mill) and turned off the worn area plus a little bit extra. Reassembled the worm and measured the gap with feeler gauges to figure out the thickness of the washer I needed to make.


        All the parts. Added new felt too..


        Made a new leadscrew key out of O1 ground stock, that just happened to be almost exactly the right size. Fits nicely now with no slop.

        new vs. old key


        finished up the apron. Cleaned out all the oil passages, put in new felts in those and the cross feed and rack gear shafts. Had to make a new nut for the rack gear shaft as I could find one in the collection of parts. Turned out ok, although the thread depth is a little shallow as I screwed up when boring it out (misread my drill chart). Bit ****** at myself about that, not that it really matters.


        apron all together



        bit of wear on the worm gear and half nuts, but not too bad, especially for a 90 year old machine.

        Have to think what to do next - tail stock or carriage. I'm going to be doing Halligan's tailstock travel mod, so I might get stuck into that first. Plus I have to wait to get the compound screw+bracket and gear cover from the previous owner.
        Your Project is coming along and looking good,be curious to see that Halligan's Mod.

        Comment


        • #19
          PM hotlinking isn't showing up for me, I have to click them. And probably won't at all for non PM users. I locally host all my photos on their respective forums. It's a lot of work, but the only was to expect permanence (hopefully) without maintaining your own website.

          Also advantageous is that the photos upload higher quality here.
          21" Royersford Excelsior CamelBack Drillpress Restoration
          1943 Sidney 16x54 Lathe Restoration

          Comment


          • #20
            ok, I'll change them, just being lazy Tomorrow though (see, lazy!).

            TTT - just worked out that I have all the materials I need to make the extension. It's 3 parts - a threaded barrel for the housing, an extension to the tailstock quill and a new tailstock screw. It'll be a challenge, I've never single pointed acme before.

            Comment


            • #21
              "and wirebrushed the paint off the rim and peg of the carriage handwheel. This isn't going to be a show queen by any stretch, but painted handwheels look the pits. Gave it a rub with Mothers and a coating of oil to stop it rusting while I'm waiting. It'll get covered in oil as soon as I start using the lathe"
              Matt
              \
              Yes, I would do just like you say. Works for me... JR
              My old yahoo group. Bridgeport Mill Group

              https://groups.yahoo.com/neo/groups/...port_mill/info

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              • #22
                Agreed, paint on handwheels is a sin. I try to keep mine shiny with use.
                21" Royersford Excelsior CamelBack Drillpress Restoration
                1943 Sidney 16x54 Lathe Restoration

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                • #23
                  Mattthemuppet: That "weird threaded but undrilled/unslotted" faceplate is probably an adaptor plate for a plainback chuck. True, it could be used for a face plate with slots put in.
                  Sarge41

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                  • #24
                    Put it on the lathe (didn't trust my vise on the mill) and turned off the worn area plus a little bit extra. Reassembled the worm and measured the gap with feeler gauges to figure out the thickness of the washer I needed to make.
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                    washer making
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                    All the parts. Added new felt too..
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                    Made a new leadscrew key out of O1 ground stock, that just happened to be almost exactly the right size. Fits nicely now with no slop.

                    new vs. old key
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                    • #25
                      finished up the apron. Cleaned out all the oil passages, put in new felts in those and the cross feed and rack gear shafts. Had to make a new nut for the rack gear shaft as I could find one in the collection of parts. Turned out ok, although the thread depth is a little shallow as I screwed up when boring it out (misread my drill chart). Bit mad at myself about that, not that it really matters.
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                      apron as I got it (largely as a record of what goes where)
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                      apron all together
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                      bit of wear on the worm gear and half nuts, but not too bad, especially for a 90 year old machine.

                      Have to think what to do next - tail stock or carriage. I'm going to be doing Halligan's tailstock travel mod, so I might get stuck into that first. Plus I have to wait to get the compound screw+bracket and gear cover from the previous owner.

                      Comment


                      • #26
                        TMB - all done, just for you (blows kiss) Glad I got it done now rather than after another couple of pages!

                        JR - thanks, too much looking forward to getting this working to want to wait and paint it. Besides, whatever this was painted (and repainted) with is tough as, better probably than anything I can add to it.

                        sarge - I think you're right, maybe for a 4 jaw as they usually come in a larger size for a given swing? Either way, it'd make a lovely face/ drive plate if needed.

                        Got the tailstock apart and cleaned up. Next up is drilling some oil galleries, adding an oil cup and making some way wipers for it. Then it'll be onto the extension mod.

                        Also got a couple of (maybe) 6" 4 jaw chucks off eBay for a ridiculous price. So ridiculous I don't want to say any more until they arrive, in case they're tiny scale models or something.

                        2nd also, big thanks to Reggie_obe for the tip to post on PM about some outside jaws, looks like I may have found a set for a very reasonable price.

                        Comment


                        • #27
                          drilled and plumbed a couple of oil galleries for the tailstock. Drilled 5/32 all the way through (only long bit I had of the right size) then 3/16 on the flat way side. Turned down the end to 5/32 of a couple of pieces of 3/16 brake line a friend gave me and tapped them into place. After I do some work on a job application I'll cross drill the flat ways into each pipe, then use a small ball nose end mill to cut some channels for oil distribution. I'll grind a couple of small ones into each V-way. Then I need to make some oil cups and way wipers..
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                          • #28
                            bleh, not my proudest work, but it'll do. Only screwed up once - put it in the 4 jaw the wrong way round, so ended up a lot thinner than intended!

                            chunk of 1/2" scrap
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                            now an oil cup! I'll make a little cap or plug later.
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                            shot of the flat way oil grooves. 3/32 ball nose from memory, not quite full diameter depth.
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                            • #29
                              plodding along. Finished the tailstock oil cups yesterday, so making way wipers today. No bets on how long it will take me to lose one of those caps!
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                              also cut the oil grooves for the v wayClick image for larger version

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                              • #30
                                You already cut them, but in my experience with a Logan, nearly the same size, If you put the oil in that top groove over the inverted V way, it gets down and lubes the entire V way just fine.

                                I doubt the oil grooves will hurt anything.

                                I just put a gits fitting over each way. The V way it's right over the groove, for the flat way (Logan has V and flat), I needed to put in a short pipe to drop the oil in a gap, and then "feathered" the edges to guide oil under the carriage.
                                When I changed carriages for a newer one, I moved the Gits to the T/S side, should have left them on the H/S side, as there is a slightly better distribution that way.
                                But either way, the simple ragged hole over the V-way does fine.






                                Last edited by J Tiers; 10-29-2020, 08:01 PM.
                                1601 2137 5683 1002 1437

                                Keep eye on ball.
                                Hashim Khan

                                If you look closely at a digital signal, you find out it is really analog......

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