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Tell me about slitting saws

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  • #16
    I always conventionally cut with slitting saws.

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    • #17
      You might need to tram the head of the mill. Then indicate the saw to see if it is flat and true to the axis.

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      • #18
        Speaking of tramming, there is a problem if the motion of the table is not in exact line with the saw. Not sure if that is classic tramming, that depends on the configuration, but generically, the saw has to be exactly in line with the table motion. otherwise wandering, and eventual saw breakage result.

        That particular saw is less susceptible to breakage, and more susceptible to wandering, because the kerf appears to be wider than the saw disc. The carbide sticks out a bit
        1601 2137 5683 1002 1437

        Keep eye on ball.
        Hashim Khan

        If you look closely at a digital signal, you find out it is really analog......

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        • #19
          I had a lot of trouble before somebody pointed out that a slitting saw looks a lot like a hack saw blade, and I should remember how fast I cut with a hack saw. Once I slowed way down I had a lot better luck. Plus I use kerosene as a coolant/lubricant.

          I've used wood cutting saws just like the one in the picture, and I have "okay" results. I go really slowly.

          One thing I'd like to know is how you advanced the work to the saw blade? Did you move the table in X axis, or Y axis? I was taught to try to engage as much of the saw as possible with a slow speed to allow it to clear the swarf. That would mean move the table in the X axis so that you first engage the flat side, rather than move it in Y and you first engage the corner.


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          • #20
            Originally posted by flathead4 View Post

            See 3 and 4 of Mcgyver's post.....
            Yes.

            Better still, see and adhere to all of Mcgyver's post.

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            • #21
              The first time you try it run it in a bit an cut , then withdrawcand see what it does.. it may dipnwhich gets worse as you keep going.

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              • #22
                slitting saws are a pain in the azz. As long as you accept that it will take forever, be miserable and look like $h!t at the end you'll be fine

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                • #23
                  Originally posted by mattthemuppet View Post
                  slitting saws are a pain in the azz. As long as you accept that it will take forever, be miserable and look like $h!t at the end you'll be fine
                  If used properly they work fine. I have used them many times, such as on a number of parts made by machining a "stick" and then cutting off the parts. The parts have had a good enough finish to use without further work.

                  I will agree that a horizontal mill is 30x better for using slitting saws, the vertical mill is the real pain in the azz.
                  1601 2137 5683 1002 1437

                  Keep eye on ball.
                  Hashim Khan

                  If you look closely at a digital signal, you find out it is really analog......

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                  • #24
                    I have always used the thin slitting saws about 2 1/2" to 3" in dia. Thickness of the saw doesn't seem to matter. I've parted SS rings like you show in you picture with no problem.

                    I don't use the fine tooth jewelers saw, slightly coarser teeth. I've also used carbide tipped cutters and they have always worked out fine.

                    Not sure why your saw blade didn't do well or why it concaved. Did you look and see how true it was running on the horizontal plane ??

                    JL................

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                    • #25
                      I've had decent luck with formal slitting saws up to 3 inch 75mm diameter, and yes, as slow as your machine can turn it. I also keep a drizzle of lube running on it while very slowly feeding it in. No science here but the lube probably helps the sides from starting to gall and stall which will break a blade in a nanosecond. I never tried a wood blade but I will as they're so cheap!

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                      • #26
                        I find that taking it easy, lotsa lube and CLIMB cutting keeps my thin slitting saw from "wandering."
                        Cheers,

                        Frank Ford
                        HomeShopTech

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                        • #27
                          Originally posted by Frank Ford View Post
                          I find that taking it easy, lotsa lube and CLIMB cutting keeps my thin slitting saw from "wandering."
                          I think that is what you are supposed to do, climb cut.

                          It kills me every time. I know, too heavy cut, too much speed not enough feed.

                          Climb cutting gets me a chip load and a De-railment. HSS doesn't like side bends.

                          3"x1" is what I use, sparingly. Kinda gun shy. So I do climb cut on slots, open slots. Everything I feed cut making sure to not rub.

                          Rubbin is not Cuttin. I dont know who said that but it was here. JR

                          My old yahoo group. Bridgeport Mill Group

                          https://groups.yahoo.com/neo/groups/...port_mill/info

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                          • #28
                            Follow up I ordered a slitting saw holder for a real hss saw I already had, it worked beautifully. Click image for larger version

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Views:	68
Size:	3.54 MB
ID:	1907243

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                            • #29
                              I was making a set of die inserts for my poly pipe fusing machine. I made 2 sets of 1 1/4“ and 1 set for 1“ pipe. Click image for larger version  Name:	977B60CD-6EB0-4584-B5EC-D5ABB1EC6F55.jpeg Views:	0 Size:	5.47 MB ID:	1907245

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                              • #30
                                Originally posted by true temper View Post
                                I was making a set of die inserts for my poly pipe fusing machine. I made 2 sets of 1 1/4“ and 1 set for 1“ pipe. Click image for larger version Name:	977B60CD-6EB0-4584-B5EC-D5ABB1EC6F55.jpeg Views:	0 Size:	5.47 MB ID:	1907245
                                Could you tell us more about your polypipe fusing machine?

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