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Relocating noisy compressor

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  • Thrud
    replied
    ponderingjunkman:
    To minimise noise - send compressor to me. Free compressors can make all the noise they want in my shop!

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  • ponderingjunkman
    replied
    Thanks for all the great suggestions! Here is my plan: Throw away the cheap craftsman compressor- which is about to die anyway, and has the inlet filter built into the head, which makes routing intake air from outside complicated. Install the new(to me) Kellogg 2 cylinder 2 stage cast iron compressor and motor(no tank) on its own self supporting stand under the lean-to in the back. The discharge pipe from the compressor will angle downward from the unit to the inside, where it will connect with a down leg installed in my current pipe system. This will be the lowest point in the system, and have a drain valve. Also to be plumbed into the system will be two forty gallon tanks placed in the attic.(for Volume!) The tanks will be fed from the bottom, so any mosture will run to the lowest point to be drained. I like the idea mentioned in a previous string of putting a car A/C condensor in the line immediately after the compressor to help condense moisture. This will go inside to keep from freezing. After the condensor will be the down leg- a 2 to 3 inch pipe with drain on bottom- and the lines leading off of this at upward angles. Rubber hydralic hose will lead from the compressor to the condensor to prevent vibration from entering the pipelines.

    I have been in a couple of places that had the inlet hose routed outside, but it was not as quiet as another place that had the compressor in another room. With the compressor out of the shop area, I'll have room for more...um...Junk!!

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  • bighammer
    replied
    Try building a muffler from a 5 gal. bucket steel or plastic fill loosely fiber glass insulation and pipe it to the intake on the pump.

    Cookie

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  • ShavingMaker
    replied
    Putting the compressor outside creates more problems from humidity if you are in a warm climate and from cold if you are in a cold climate. I would say keep it inside.
    Mass absorbs sound waves. Keeping that in mind, I can see a couple of ways to route the incoming air (which I am going to try now that I think of it!):
    1. Run the intake outside, but run it from the compressor into the block wall at one point with a pipe flange and then put an intake flange at another distant point on the outside of the block wall. The air will come thru the blocks by various paths and the concrete will deaden the sound. No irate neighbors. Also, the cold blocks will help dehumidify the incoming air.
    2. If you don't have block walls, run the intake pipe thru the wall into a barrel of rocks outside. Same principles of rock mass for deadening sound and cold rocks for dehumidifying.

    If you try either of these be sure to have a good filter in the line after the wall and before the air enters the compressor.

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  • Astroknobs
    replied
    I have the same problem. Do you have a "cheap" direct drive oilless compressor that runs at 3400 rpm like I do? If so, the first thing to do is sell it and buy a belt drive, two cylinder, oiled sump, cast iron compressor. then pipe the intake outside and you'll have a much quieter compressor. I'm most of the way through this process. --Jerry

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  • darryl
    replied
    I can certainly see some problems with moisture, if you're in a humid climeate. I wonder if you can suck the inlet air through a container of driveway deicer. That stuff absorbs moisture and heats up in doing so, hence it's ability to de-ice. It can be dried when saturated by heating in the oven, then put back in the 'cannister' for reuse. You'd want to prevent it from being sucked into the comressor, of course, using a screen with fine enough mesh. Just an idea, I haven't tried it.

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  • WJHartson
    replied
    Lube oil has been covered so I won't comment on that. You will need to worry about condensation that collects in the tank and piping. Consider putting an automatic valve to empty the tank and if you have a drip leg with a drain valve it will have to be drained daily. You can use the light blubs as suggested but might want to consider heat tracing tape on the air lines with thermostat control.

    Hope this helps.

    Joe

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  • burnlast
    replied
    Run inlet pipe outside,like Paul said.You won't believe the difference it makes.It will also eliminate a lot of the problems caused by setting it outside.

    Burnlast!!!!

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  • charlie coghill
    replied
    As has been posted build a hutch around the compressor and install a small heater on a thermastat and set it at 40* or so. My compressor sets in a small building behind the shop and has never given any problems, but normaly it does not get that cold here.
    CC

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  • wierdscience
    replied
    Ya put it outside in a little shack insulate it with 2"of builders foam board.(1)you get rid of the noise(2)its safer(have seen the result of two tanks exploding bad scene!)As for the cold change your lube or better yet install a couple of 100 watt bulbs on a seperate switch so when its cold the heat will keep it resonably warm other than that be sure you stay on top of draining the condesate fron the tank and lines weekly in winter daily in summer also provde for a door for summer ventilation.Other than that you shouldn't have any problems.

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  • Alistair Hosie
    replied
    Ponderingjunkman (love the name) I actually believe you could put it outside with an insulated hutch this guy I told you about in the article did just that. Then space would not be a premium or are you too close to neighbours .Alistair

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  • Paul Gauthier
    replied
    ponderingjunkman:

    Just pipe the inlet pipe from your compressor to the outside. It should quiet things down considerably

    ------------------
    Paul G.

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  • ponderingjunkman
    replied
    Yes, reverberation in the attic could be counterproductive! Building a hutch around it would take up room, which is at a premium. The Amsoil idea is great, didn't know they made compressor oil! I truly should have known, because my dad is an Amsoil dealer. What specific qualities does compressor oil have? my current Craftsman aluminum case compressor is on its last legs, but the relocation will be done with a 2 stage Kellogg that I got at Cabin Fever. Thanks for the help!!

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  • SGW
    replied
    AMS/OIL sells synthetic compressor oil, which doesn't care as much about the cold weather. (I'm assuming here you have a regular piston-type compressor with a sump.) I think if you put in synthetic oil, you could put it outside without a problem. If you put it right up against the building and build an enclosure around it, it won't get quite as cold as "all outdoors," either. If it runs with some regularity it will warm up, anyway.

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  • Alistair Hosie
    replied
    I read somewhere that putting a compressor in an attic dramatically increases noise levels.Sorry can't help you with the cold question. I understand they can be very noisy,did you know that you can get virtually noiseless compressors they use them in dental surgeries for obvious reasons. Also try putting the compressor on some old tires or build an insulated hutch around it even outside this can be done.I have plans somewhere here for such a problem the noiseless ones are a bit expensive but very quiet.If you need to get further info on the hutch let me know and I will look it up . Alistair

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