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OT. Removing stuck mini bike tire from rim

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  • #16
    Pump it up and then try breaking the bead in the press.
    I seldom do anything within the scope of logical reason and calculated cost/benefit, etc- I'm following my passion-

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    • #17
      I usually break beads with a claw hammer, just drive the claws into the bead and rotate the hammer.

      Jon
      SW Mi

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      • #18
        Originally posted by Doozer View Post
        Dish soap.--Doozer
        Waste of time. He's trying to get it off, not on.

        Southwest Utah

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        • #19
          Try soaking the assembly in hot water. Boil it if you need to, then try to break the bead.
          Southwest Utah

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          • #20
            pull a vacuum, hook up a vacuum pump to the stem

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            • #21
              Originally posted by BCRider View Post

              I'll say "just kidding"... EVERYONE knows this trick is for seating the bead and instant inflation. Not removing it...

              OK, back to serious... When you used your arbor press did you take the time to make the little curved and coned shoe that will push in evenly at the edge of the rim or did you just go at it with the square end of the ram?

              Take a little time to make the curved shoe that matches the curve of the rim. I'll bet that the reason the motorcycle shop didn't have any luck is because their own curved shoe is sized for much bigger diameter rims. The match of the curve and the fact that it is angled a little so it tries to self direct itself in and under the rim's edge becomes way more important on these small tight sizes and with a very soft sidewall.
              The tool that I made for the arbor press is angled down slightly and about an inch and a quarter wide, not curved to fit the rim. The problem is that the sidewall gives way and the tool slips off the tire.
              OPEN EYES, OPEN EARS, OPEN MIND

              THINK HARDER

              BETTER TO HAVE TOOLS YOU DON'T NEED THAN TO NEED TOOLS YOU DON'T HAVE

              MY NAME IS BRIAN AND I AM A TOOLOHOLIC

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              • #22
                Originally posted by Baz View Post
                You did check with water that the bead is leaking and not the valve? I had a slow in a trailer tyre last month and couldn't find the hole in the tube at all. Pumped a little more air in to 'open up' the hole and low and behold it's the valve. Sometimes it seats and sometimes it doesn't.
                On my Landrover tyres I use the jack on the bead and get the pressure point right close to the bead. It can lift a whole corner of the vehicle up and jump on it to get the pressure.
                I ran water over it and it is definitely the bead that is leaking. I did just have a valve core leak on my pull behind sprayer. Put a new one in it and it's problem solved. I usually use the bucket on my front end loader to break beads from car and truck tires.
                OPEN EYES, OPEN EARS, OPEN MIND

                THINK HARDER

                BETTER TO HAVE TOOLS YOU DON'T NEED THAN TO NEED TOOLS YOU DON'T HAVE

                MY NAME IS BRIAN AND I AM A TOOLOHOLIC

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                • #23
                  After having changed literally thousands of tires in my younger years I found that the secret to breaking a bead manually rests solely on ones ability to wedge the bead off of the rim. Prying on the sidewall gets old fast and produces no results. One needs to get between the bead and the rim.
                  A tire hammer works great on the larger tires but due to the dynamics involved no so much for the smaller tires mainly because they move around a lot. Anchor it down and work a suitably shaped wedge around it's perimeter and it will come, it does take a solid hit and substantial force and you must be diligent on working your way around the rim. Don't expect to wedge it off in one location only on the rim, take little bites all around the rim. Suitably shaped large dull chisel can actually make a decent wedge tool to get between the bead and rim.

                  The tool I linked to previously though does make things oh so much easier since it can wedge into one spot on the wheel and force the bead down by it's ability to remain clamped tightly to the wheel while staying in place to apply a huge amount of down force to the bead. Handy little tool to have when dealing with this sort of issue. I believe there are commercial versions of this tool but they are so simple to fabricate, plus it makes for a good excuse to build another tool.
                  Home, down in the valley behind the Red Angus
                  Bad Decisions Make Good Stories​

                  Location: British Columbia

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                  • #24
                    Soak the bead with a good penatrant like Kroil oil. Rust on the rim will sometimes transfer to the rubber. I like kroil. Try to get some wedge between tire and rim as you use your lubricant.

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                    • #25
                      Willy mentioned a commercial version of the tool he gave the link for. I started to watch the video on making the one and in the sidebar was a link to a video for the "BeadBuster XB-550" (sounds like a Tim "The Toolman" Taylor joke name ). It looks like it works in much the same way with a clamp that pushes the bead breaking finger deep between the rim and bead.

                      https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kKRnii5kNis

                      It was that sort of reach in tight between the bead and rim edge that I was trying to describe for the end to use with your arbor press. And if the wheel tries to walk out and push the end up onto the sidewall perhaps a base with some blocking that holds or lets you pry upward to hold the foot of the presser in the rim would be the other thing.

                      Or if you want to make something similar to that BeadBuster it seems like it has a lot less parts and is a lot smaller on the shelf than the bigger beast that Willy's guy made. Same idea for sure. But easier to make.
                      Chilliwack BC, Canada

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                      • #26
                        You can put some kind of fixture to keep the rim from sliding around the arbor press table and press with a little piece of bar with a radius just touching the rim
                        Helder Ferreira
                        Setubal, Portugal

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                        • #27
                          I finally got the tire off. The tool that I made to fit into my arbor press was too thick to get all the way under the bead and up to the rim so I milled it to about 1/32 at the narrowest and was able to lean into it and keep the tool tight to the rim. It popped with a bunch of rust dust coming out from the bead.

                          I had brought it to a mower place and all they accomplished was to bend my rim with a hammer. I took it to a motorcycle shop and he said no go.

                          Now that I've gotten this far into it I ordered new tires and sandblasted/wire brushed the rim and repainted the rear one so far. If these rims to the minibike is probably trash.

                          Thanks everyone for the tips on this job.
                          OPEN EYES, OPEN EARS, OPEN MIND

                          THINK HARDER

                          BETTER TO HAVE TOOLS YOU DON'T NEED THAN TO NEED TOOLS YOU DON'T HAVE

                          MY NAME IS BRIAN AND I AM A TOOLOHOLIC

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                          • #28
                            One last note on the mini bike tire saga. The rim was so rusted all over the inside that even after I cleaned it there was deep pitting. Buying another one isn't likely as this minibike is probably 40 years old. Wheel is all painted up but the pitting won't let it take air. What's a guy to do?

                            I had heard that starting fluid could be sprayed into the tire and ignite it and it would pop the tire on. The bead is still in good shape on the rim. I gave it a small shot and it didn't do much. Gave it a second slightly larger shot and it almost seated it enough for me to air it up. Gave it one more try with a little bit more than last time and it popped right onto the bead. I used a propane torch to ignite it in case anything went sideways while it popped. I've been hearing about this trick for probably 50 years and today is the first time I have used it.

                            With all that said, Usual disclaimers apply. Don't try this at home.
                            OPEN EYES, OPEN EARS, OPEN MIND

                            THINK HARDER

                            BETTER TO HAVE TOOLS YOU DON'T NEED THAN TO NEED TOOLS YOU DON'T HAVE

                            MY NAME IS BRIAN AND I AM A TOOLOHOLIC

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                            • #29
                              I would look into making it a tubed tire.

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                              • #30
                                A note for rusted rims.
                                Yes a tube fixes all. But to restore the pitted surface to hold air, just sand blast all the rust out and coat it with bondo. Sand and repeat. Paint it and bake the paint out at 200 F. It'll hold air for years.

                                BTDT.

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