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Semi-off topic: Trailer Tires

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  • Semi-off topic: Trailer Tires

    So I had a blow out on my trailer when heading to an auction to pick up some purchases. No big deal except I left my spare wheel at home since I wasn't going to be carrying anything super heavy and I was only driving about an hour. Usually I bring it with me but thought I'd chance it this time... and of course this is the time I really needed the spare

    Anyway, the tires on this trailer are about 12 years old - way past the manufacturer's recommended 5 year lifespan. I'm looking at replacing them but I need to be careful how much I spend given that these tires spend most of their life sitting stationary. It's always the sunlight and age that kill them, not miles. It's still worth it to have a trailer on-hand for those of you who thinking of responding that I should sell the trailer and rent instead

    "Gladiator" brand versus "Taskmaster Provider" brand?

    Both of these are made-in-China tires and roughly the same cost. I can get a Gladiator tire that is the next load rating up and next speed rating up for about $10 more per tire than the "Taskmaster" brand. Anyone have experience with these? They seem to get decent reviews on tirereivewsandmore.com

    I'm also thinking of having these mounted and balanced at Walmart. Right now, my trailer tires are not balanced and, unloaded, I get a wicked torsional oscillation at about 35 mph. Even a sub-optimal balancing has to be better than what I've been putting up with. But I imagine there are a fair number of horror stories associated with Walmart tire service. Any thoughts?

  • #2
    No experience buying trailer tires, but if you already have a trailer, keep it. Just get good tires and take steps to preserve them with covers and concrete pads for them to sit on. I wish I had a trailer. Maybe someday.
    S E Michigan

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    • #3
      I would not hesitate to use Walmart tire or auto service. The few times I have, have certainly been satisfactory.
      Lynn (Huntsville, AL)

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      • #4
        It makes me wonder what is involved with DOT tire testing in this country. Everything seems to be wuhanium made junk. It passes testing or or wouldn't be on the road but they often fail miserably in use. Obviously the quality has diminished but I wonder how much grief is user poor selection and neglect.

        It also seems that to get any semblance of life out of tires yes you have to go up one or two ratings. We all have heard the china made tire horror stories. "Put on a new set and within one year some blew out, lost their tread etc." Goodyear? Nope, same chin made junk. For comparison, the trailer I have is a smallish (retired 1970's vintage Uhaul 5x7) that had a set of Uhaul approved Goodyear bias ply tires on it when I got it in 1990. These still had good tread but after perhaps 35 years were weather cracking and I tossed them a couple years ago. Excellent service compared to today's rolling crap.


        I have a set of Carlisles. Yup Wuhanium. These are on the single axle trailer and occasional use, maybe 1000 pound per tire loading max. 2 years and maybe 1000 miles on them and they're ok. 55 psi, no cracking etc. They don't lose pressure over months of non use, balanced and they don't seem to have any vibration etc. Dead smooth with a 1500 pound load on them. For example from scamazon, https://www.amazon.com/s?k=Carlisle+...ref=nb_sb_noss

        I'm pretty sure this is what's on my trailer. The kid has it for a while so I can't be sure. https://www.amazon.com/Carlisle-Radi...3556271&sr=8-6
        Last edited by I make chips; 10-24-2020, 01:32 PM.

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        • #5
          Trailer tires are junk. Use light truck tires!

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          • #6
            You didn't say what size tires you have. no704 is on the money, buy light truck tires if they will fit. For my utility trailer I picked up a pair of used 31X10.50's at a tire store for a very reasonable price.
            For my RV I bought new LT tires.

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            • #7
              I was suprised to read 55lbs above. I never had a tyre that took more than 35 for car or trailer, even my Landrover only takes 30 for normal running. Last week as I was towing my little 4x6 on the motorway lightly loaded with logs I was overtaken at speed by an empty double axle with the front nearside starting to shred. I expected to see him on the verge in a few miles but either he took an exit or the remaining axle is enough if you are not carrying.

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              • #8
                Chinese trailer tires are known as "China bombs" as they blow out frequently, even brand new. Adam Booth had such a failure. I'd avoid if possible.
                21" Royersford Excelsior CamelBack Drillpress Restoration
                1943 Sidney 16x54 Lathe Restoration

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                • #9
                  Load rand "E" truck tires are your best bet.
                  I changed the rims on my one fire truck because they are 20"
                  and only 20" rubber you can get is made in China.
                  I switched to 22.5" rims.

                  -Doozer
                  DZER

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                  • #10
                    Just so we're all on the same page, these tires run at 80 to 100 PSI and are typically a 12 ply tire or heavier. I want low rolling resistance and a very stiff sidewall. Too much risk of damage with an LT tire being hammered by my trailer's "suspension" when there's 12,000 lbs. on it.

                    "China bombs" are typically travel trailer tires. I think Castle Rock was the infamous brand name but my understanding of the situation is that they were laid up as LT tires but with the ST branding. They have thinner sidewalls, which makes the trailer ride smoother but also more prone to blowout when used on a trailer.

                    Unfortunately, most trailer tires are made in China these days. Taskmaster Provider has about a 50% market share and you see them on commercial dry vans and livestock haulers pretty often. The heavier load rating of the Gladiators is tempting but I'm not sure how they compare in quality. Probably all from the same factory in China anyway As far as I know, the only made-in-USA trailer tire (for small trailers like mine) are Goodyear Endurance tires.

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                    • #11
                      Originally posted by Baz View Post
                      I was suprised to read 55lbs above. I never had a tyre that took more than 35 for car or trailer, even my Landrover only takes 30 for normal running. Last week as I was towing my little 4x6 on the motorway lightly loaded with logs I was overtaken at speed by an empty double axle with the front nearside starting to shred. I expected to see him on the verge in a few miles but either he took an exit or the remaining axle is enough if you are not carrying.
                      I can confirm that an empty double axle trailer runs just fine with one tire missing. I limped it that way to the auction so I could start loading while a tire shop fitted a new tire to the rim.

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                      • #12
                        Avoid buying Chinese tires.
                        12" x 35" Logan 2557V lathe
                        Index "Super 55" mill
                        18" Vectrax vertical bandsaw
                        7" x 10" Vectrax mitering bandsaw
                        24" State disc sander

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                        • #13
                          Originally posted by ezduzit View Post
                          Avoid buying Chinese tires.
                          Even if that means buying NO tires? Seems extreme.
                          1601 2137 5683 1002 1437

                          Keep eye on ball.
                          Hashim Khan

                          If you look closely at a digital signal, you find out it is really analog......

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                          • #14
                            Originally posted by J Tiers View Post

                            Even if that means buying NO tires? Seems extreme.
                            If you have only 1 choice (ie no choices) of tire, you're definitely doing something wrong.
                            12" x 35" Logan 2557V lathe
                            Index "Super 55" mill
                            18" Vectrax vertical bandsaw
                            7" x 10" Vectrax mitering bandsaw
                            24" State disc sander

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Originally posted by ezduzit View Post
                              Avoid buying Chinese tires.
                              I'm guessing a very high percentage of most products we buy are delivered with Trucks&Trailers that run Made in China tires.Have been running China Tires on Super B Grain trailers for many years 18 tires on trailer alone and have been happy.The 10 Michelin Tires on Truck that pull these trailers have been Okay but more issues than trailer tires,no identification where there made but are nearly $800 Cdn. Per tire.

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