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Source for high temp retaining compound?

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  • Source for high temp retaining compound?

    I can’t get into a lot of details about the application but does anyone know of a retaining compound capable of withstanding continuous 600 degrees Fahrenheit?

    Inner sleeve is steel and outer is a brass or bronze material. They start out as a press fit but use/wear get them loose and need to be secured. They are approx 2” wide and 6” dia.

    The ends of these can not be beveled for silver solder to sit in and there is no way for mechanical fasteners.

    Heat is applied to the outside first until the entire thing is up to temp.

    All the retaining compounds I have looked at seem to be 300-400 max temp. I thought rocksett may be a good candidate and I didn’t personally talk to them but someone at the plant called and was told the dis-similar metals would cause a problem and failure with heat expansion.


  • #2
    I’ve been looking into similar issues lately. Most I have found are ceramic water cooled.

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    • #3
      last time i looked jb-weld was 300°c.

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      • #4
        Originally posted by dian View Post
        last time i looked jb-weld was 300°c.
        It would possibly work on the very loose ones but I think it is too thick and would just get pushed off on assembly.

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        • #5
          up to what temperature can you use sodium silicate?

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          • #6
            Originally posted by oxford View Post

            It would possibly work on the very loose ones but I think it is too thick and would just get pushed off on assembly.
            You could warm it first, epoxies thin when heated but you gotta be fast because heating also vastly speeds the cure time. Does not take a lot of heat, something like a heat gun is good.

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            • #7
              Originally posted by Sparky_NY View Post

              You could warm it first, epoxies thin when heated but you gotta be fast because heating also vastly speeds the cure time. Does not take a lot of heat, something like a heat gun is good.
              Stay away from the fast cure stuff for this method, it gets WAY too fast !

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              • #8
                Take care with published maximums for compounds like JB weld. The max doesn't mean it's like it is at room temp... In my experience at max it's like lumpy road tar on a hot day, but doesn't recover all properties when cool. Try to find manf data on strength verses temperature, and actually test a portion on the underlying material in-use at your operating temperature then cooled to see what happens.

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by ikdor View Post
                  up to what temperature can you use sodium silicate?
                  they use it in sand for casting. but does that glue metal?

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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by dian View Post

                    they use it in sand for casting. but does that glue metal?
                    Well, when they had the program here to get old gas guzzling cars off the road, I understand they used that to jam the engines and make sure they were scrapped. If it doesn't stick well enough, I'd suppose some other thing would be used. It is also used for a sealant on wood stoves, which definitely get hotter than the OP wants, AND presumably sticks well enough to cast iron.

                    I'd think it works to a very high temp, since it is used to make sand mold cores even for iron casting.
                    1601 2137 5683 1002 1437

                    Keep eye on ball.
                    Hashim Khan

                    If you look closely at a digital signal, you find out it is really analog......

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                    • #11
                      Originally posted by oxford View Post
                      The ends of these can not be beveled for silver solder to sit in
                      600 is pretty hot. Whats the diameter and length of joint and whats the clearance? Silver solder sounds like a good approach, and there is no requirement for beveling. SS has less of a range on on acceptable clearance though than retaining compound, irrc. Without knowing more details, I'd be thinking revisit SS
                      in Toronto Ontario - where are you?

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                      • #12
                        Yes, sliver solder will wick nicely, the higher silver content type the better. Preheat thoroughly is the key.

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                        • #13
                          I have this book marked but haven't tried them yet;
                          http://www.cotronics.com/vo/cotr/index.htm
                          Len

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                          • #14
                            Instead of a Brass sleeve could you Braze it then machine to spec. ?
                            Beaver County Alberta Canada

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                            • #15
                              Originally posted by Mcgyver View Post

                              600 is pretty hot. Whats the diameter and length of joint and whats the clearance? S
                              Approx 6” dia and 2” wide. Clearance on the loose ones is .001-.003” I’m guessing but some of them are probably .000” and some are press fit.

                              Ideally all of these would be addressed with whatever the “solution” is. Another problem is I have access to some old ones but the new rings are around $1500-$1800 a piece and screwing them up isn’t really an option.

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