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Source for high temp retaining compound?

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  • #31
    Originally posted by Cuttings View Post
    Loctite 2422 and 2620 are listed as being capable of resisting temperatures up to 650° F

    Thanks.

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    • #32
      Originally posted by Cuttings View Post
      Loctite 2422 and 2620 are listed as being capable of resisting temperatures up to 650° F
      couldn't tell you the difference in performance you might expect or if there are any, but those are thread locking adhesives not retaining compounds.
      in Toronto Ontario - where are you?

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      • #33
        I have called up Loctite for application advice with good success. An email might be just as good these days.
        Location: North Central Texas

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        • #34
          Originally posted by Mcgyver View Post

          couldn't tell you the difference in performance you might expect or if there are any, but those are thread locking adhesives not retaining compounds.
          Those are the only Loctite products I could find on the product selector I have with a temperature rating that high. Not sure how old this thing is, but I have had it for quite a while.Loctite doesn't seam to change the numbers on there product very often. They just add more products to the list as far as I can tell.
          Larry - west coast of Canada

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          • #35
            Loctite 2422 is supposed to be good up to 650f. Technically a threadlocker, but might be worth looking into?

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            • #36
              Thanks for the replies so far.

              Since it came up, I have a few questions about silver solder.

              My experience with it consists of a job I worked at as a teenager and here are the parts and the torch, go “silver solder” these fittings and tubes into these those blocks. I got good at what they needed done but I have no idea what the flux or solder actually was.

              As far as my current situation, if the parts see a max temp of 600f will solder with a melting point of 650f be enough safety margin? With what is going on with these parts, the lower the soldering temp the better.

              Lets say that the solder has a melting point of 650f, is it possible to put the parts into the oven and take them up to 700f pull them out and then feed the solder into the joint instead of trying to heat it up with the torch?

              Any recommendations for solder and flux?

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              • #37
                I'm not sure there is a solder in the 650 range....there's a big gap between soft solders, say 350 - 450 and silver solders (a braze) at say 1250F (it varies).

                I'd try your standard Easyflo 45. Some struggle with SS, but its easy if you don't try and cheat the basics - very clean, lots of flux and get it hot enough without burning the flux (happens if you apply sa O/A directly on the flux). I usually use the technique Kozo Hiroka outlined decades ago - put little bits of clipped 1/16 dia pieces of SS on the joint and warm everything up evenly. The flux will boil, dry up and shortly after, presto, solder melts and gets sucked in. For such a large area joint I might diverge from that and manually feed the solder so as to be sure it got enough - if you do that stick end of the SS in flux before applying. I'd make corner out of IFB and have go at it.
                in Toronto Ontario - where are you?

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