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Greasy grinding wheel

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  • redlee
    replied
    I would be concerned about any solvent affecting the bond of the wheel.

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  • OaklandGB
    replied
    Just my opinion here but I would not trust a wheel that has been soaked or has grease embedded in it. Same as one with physical damage or has been dropped. Junk it, and replace with new.

    Take J Tiers, and Elf's advice.

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  • Bented
    replied
    Originally posted by Doozer View Post
    You people are nuts.

    -D
    I find that insulting, you are however partially correct (-:

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  • J Tiers
    replied
    yeah.... were it me, that wheel would be in the trash. Looks coarse, gray, and has a non-standard hole (for my shop anyhow). Three strikes, and it's out. PLUS its likely off balance as a result of the gunk.

    Not liking pieces flying past my head (those are better than the ones that don't make it past, though), I'd pitch that sucker. With all that greasy stuff, it likely will not "ring", and any wheels that do not ring (but should) go O.U.T. here.
    Last edited by J Tiers; 10-27-2020, 09:28 PM.

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  • reggie_obe
    replied
    Originally posted by Tim Clarke View Post
    This was a question based on curiosity rather than actual need. And yes, I know all about blotters, and checking for cracks. In this case the blotters self destructed when I took the wheel off the grinder, which was given to me.

    And yes Reggie, this is the home shop machinist board. HSM's are known to hang out here.
    ......and noted to do thing that demonstrate the adage, "Penny wise and Pound foolish".

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  • Tim Clarke
    replied
    This was a question based on curiosity rather than actual need. And yes, I know all about blotters, and checking for cracks. In this case the blotters self destructed when I took the wheel off the grinder, which was given to me.

    And yes Reggie, this is the home shop machinist board. HSM's are known to hang out here.

    Leave a comment:


  • Doozer
    replied
    You people are nuts.

    -D

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  • elf
    replied
    Originally posted by reggie_obe View Post

    Because it's HSM..
    He's Squished Meat

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  • reggie_obe
    replied
    Originally posted by elf View Post
    Why risk an exploding wheel when they're so inexpensive?
    Because it's HSM..

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  • elf
    replied
    Why risk an exploding wheel when they're so inexpensive?

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  • lakeside53
    replied
    What's wrong with just dressing it? real dresser....

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  • reggie_obe
    replied
    How did it get greasy? Was someone using something like: https://www.abrasivesupply.com/Cutti...ants_s/627.htm
    I see it's also missing the blotter, is this a wheel you are trying to salvage?

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  • Bob Engelhardt
    replied
    What I would do is put it in water and gently boil it for a while. The heat will melt the grease and it will float to the surface. I would use soap in a second run if needed. Easy, cheap, gentle, no lasting ill effects.

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  • J Tiers
    replied
    It is probably worth noting that wheels differ.

    The advice so far has been appropriate to a vitrified wheel, which the OP appears to have, but there are other types of bond used aside from vitrified type bonds. Lye based or solvent based treatments may not be appropriate to every wheel type that may be encountered.

    It is possible for certain solvents to weaken or damage the wheel bonding and make the wheel dangerous, either for a certain time if the solvent may be temporarily absorbed, or potentially permanently, if the solvent actually dissolves and carries away some of the bond material. I am thinking here of "rubber" and so-called "shellac" bonds, but there may be others.

    Some of the affected bonds may have fallen out of use, but we, as generally hobby users, may have rather elderly wheels that may be of older and no longer popular bonding types.

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  • aliva
    replied
    Try white gas ( Naphtha). Soak it for a couple of hours then put in a container of oil dry ( sorball). Be sure its fully covered. Leave it here for a day or 2. I used to do this with oil soaked brakes shoes, always worked for me

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