Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

PSA: Machine Your Type 50 Plate Grinding Wheels (Carbide Grinder)

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • #16
    Originally posted by The Metal Butcher View Post

    Lol no.
    , tthat it must be potato chip.
    It is Potatoes chips folks, best description
    JR

    My old yahoo group. Bridgeport Mill Group

    https://groups.yahoo.com/neo/groups/...port_mill/info

    Comment


    • #17
      Originally posted by RB211 View Post

      But your chucking up on the stone which isn't true, then machining the backplate. Of course the backplate isn't going to show true.
      Not sure how you say that.

      He has it in a six jaw chuck, so it is not got unbalanced chucking forces. He COULD NOT bend it much without cracking the vitrified wheel, and he did not do that. If he had it out of true, he should have gotten ONE side cleaning up, and nothing on the rest.

      Nope, that thing is a "pringle" for sure.
      3751 6193 2700 3517

      Keep eye on ball.
      Hashim Khan

      If you look closely at a digital signal, you find out it is really analog......

      Comment


      • #18
        Just as an aside: Not a particular fan of Norbide. I have a couple sticks, and they do work, but their best use is to "shape" a wheel- like if you need a radiused corner or something.

        For actual dressing and especially truing, use a single-point diamond. And in something like a tool grinder- that is, with tables with a slot for an angle gage- it's well worth the time to whip up a small slider that rides in that slot, and holds the diamond at a fixed distance from the wheel.

        Doc.
        Doc's Machine. (Probably not what you expect.)

        Comment


        • #19
          Originally posted by RB211 View Post

          But your chucking up on the stone which isn't true, then machining the backplate. Of course the backplate isn't going to show true.
          Sounds odd but is correct.

          The Vitrified Stone is what matters, that is doing the work.

          It seem like shaping everything around a center.

          zYo have to find one. JR
          My old yahoo group. Bridgeport Mill Group

          https://groups.yahoo.com/neo/groups/...port_mill/info

          Comment


          • #20
            Originally posted by J Tiers View Post

            Not sure how you say that.

            He has it in a six jaw chuck, so it is not got unbalanced chucking forces. He COULD NOT bend it much without cracking the vitrified wheel, and he did not do that. If he had it out of true, he should have gotten ONE side cleaning up, and nothing on the rest.

            Nope, that thing is a "pringle" for sure.
            It was in the 6 jaw, but only using 3 jaws. The other 3 weren't touching. 6 jaws don't particularly like non-round material. The second one I just removed 3 jaws to make sure they didn't interfere. My friend suggested the term "saddle" shaped, which is a better description than what I was using. But yes, exactly.

            Originally posted by Doc Nickel View Post
            Just as an aside: Not a particular fan of Norbide. I have a couple sticks, and they do work, but their best use is to "shape" a wheel- like if you need a radiused corner or something.

            For actual dressing and especially truing, use a single-point diamond. And in something like a tool grinder- that is, with tables with a slot for an angle gage- it's well worth the time to whip up a small slider that rides in that slot, and holds the diamond at a fixed distance from the wheel.

            Doc.
            I do need to make something like that. But you know about irons in the fire all too well. Lowish on the list.
            21" Royersford Excelsior CamelBack Drillpress Restoration
            1943 Sidney 16x54 Lathe Restoration

            Comment


            • #21
              I finally have gotten a chance to use this grinder a reasonable amount, and it's totally fixed. No more tool bouncing off the stone. So much nicer. Really makes radius tools a breeze to make.
              21" Royersford Excelsior CamelBack Drillpress Restoration
              1943 Sidney 16x54 Lathe Restoration

              Comment


              • #22
                Originally posted by wierdscience View Post

                I picked up two diamond wheels to fit mine from CDCO. about $75ish. They work fine, I got a 100 grit for roughing and a 180 for finishing.

                http://www.cdcotools.com/
                How thick was the bond on them? I looked at CDCO website and couldn't tell at all.
                OPEN EYES, OPEN EARS, OPEN MIND

                THINK HARDER

                BETTER TO HAVE TOOLS YOU DON'T NEED THAN TO NEED TOOLS YOU DON'T HAVE

                MY NAME IS BRIAN AND I AM A TOOLOHOLIC

                Comment


                • #23
                  I sometimes use a Norbide stick for hogging the corner of a wheel down to begin putting a radius on it but prefer one of these if I don't have a diamond point available. The price is right too.
                  https://www.amazon.com/Norton-Abrasi...s%2C183&sr=8-5
                  OPEN EYES, OPEN EARS, OPEN MIND

                  THINK HARDER

                  BETTER TO HAVE TOOLS YOU DON'T NEED THAN TO NEED TOOLS YOU DON'T HAVE

                  MY NAME IS BRIAN AND I AM A TOOLOHOLIC

                  Comment


                  • #24
                    I found a place that made CBN wheels to my spec for reasonable money. I wrote about it here: https://bbs.homeshopmachinist.net/fo...80#post1678380

                    You don't really learn about dressing a wheel until you try to get a real good finish on a surface grinder. I have seen little blocks that hold dressing diamond shanks and that ride in the grooves on a carbide grinder table. With one of those you can probably get the face pretty flat. Use your dressing stone to just break the inside and outside edges after. Then touch a piece of wood to the running wheel face. Reason is after dressing some of the abrasive didn't quite come loose during dressing but is sort of just hanging on. The wood will remove those.

                    metalmagpie

                    Comment


                    • #25
                      I guess I'm in the boat of not touching the backing plate, but rather dress the wheel properly with a diamond point.

                      Comment


                      • #26
                        Originally posted by RB211 View Post
                        I guess I'm in the boat of not touching the backing plate, but rather dress the wheel properly with a diamond point.
                        Just fine, IF the mounting face of the wheel is flat. Otherwise, there may be an issue getting the wheel mounted correctly, and keeping it mounted the same way. Or, in bad cases, even cracking the wheel, or the bond between it and the plate.

                        Pic 1 in this thread is an illustration. The "pringle shape" included two opposite corners of the hole pattern. It may be that only one of those two could be flat to the flange it mounts to, because the other would be up off the flange, or , as in the picture, those two appear to be "higher than" the other two relative to the flange, so they would touch, but the other two could not both touch at once.

                        Cinching down might crack the abrasive, or just break the bond between abrasive and plate.
                        3751 6193 2700 3517

                        Keep eye on ball.
                        Hashim Khan

                        If you look closely at a digital signal, you find out it is really analog......

                        Comment


                        • #27
                          Originally posted by J Tiers View Post

                          Just fine, IF the mounting face of the wheel is flat. Otherwise, there may be an issue getting the wheel mounted correctly, and keeping it mounted the same way. Or, in bad cases, even cracking the wheel, or the bond between it and the plate.

                          Pic 1 in this thread is an illustration. The "pringle shape" included two opposite corners of the hole pattern. It may be that only one of those two could be flat to the flange it mounts to, because the other would be up off the flange, or , as in the picture, those two appear to be "higher than" the other two relative to the flange, so they would touch, but the other two could not both touch at once.

                          Cinching down might crack the abrasive, or just break the bond between abrasive and plate.
                          If the backing plate isn't flat, it's defective and should be returned

                          Comment


                          • #28
                            Originally posted by RB211 View Post

                            If the backing plate isn't flat, it's defective and should be returned
                            I do not disagree.... just mentioning that no amount of work on the abrasive side will do any good.

                            The OP opted to fix, and not return.
                            3751 6193 2700 3517

                            Keep eye on ball.
                            Hashim Khan

                            If you look closely at a digital signal, you find out it is really analog......

                            Comment


                            • #29
                              Originally posted by RB211 View Post

                              If the backing plate isn't flat, it's defective and should be returned
                              Lol. This forum is the king of 100 hour solutions to $10 problems. In this case it was a 15 minute solution. NBD. That's my opinion at least. Others can opt to return or whatever they are comfortable with/ can wait for.
                              21" Royersford Excelsior CamelBack Drillpress Restoration
                              1943 Sidney 16x54 Lathe Restoration

                              Comment


                              • #30
                                Originally posted by bborr01 View Post

                                How thick was the bond on them? I looked at CDCO website and couldn't tell at all.
                                Mine are 1/8"
                                I just need one more tool,just one!

                                Comment

                                Working...
                                X