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  • Long Handled Ratchet

    Three lengths predominate. Name brand, 15" Lesser name brand, "18", and brands I've never heard of, 24" One of the lesser brands is Seigen, out of UK. 24". Ever heard of them?

    For long handle ratchets, what is your preference?

  • #2
    Never heard of Siegen before, had too look that up, looks like its a branding from Sealey tools. Sealey tools are just another mid-range importer/re-brander here in the UK.

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    • #3
      I like Coors beer.

      -D
      DZER

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      • #4
        Over the years I managed to destroy a couple of ratchets with cheater bars. It is so very tempting to put a cheater on to undo a stubborn nut. I learnt from experience and now have a couple of long solid breaker bars. What would be the advantage of long ratchets?
        Regards David Powell.

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        • #5
          I have a socket that goes between the breaker bar and the socket. Turn the ring one way and it ratchets clockwise, turn the other way, and oounterclockwise. It is useful, but not as convenient as having a long handled ratchet. I have a tractor, and some bolts are in holes that have less than standard clearance, because they are for high stress attachments. A standard size ratchet wears you out fast. Gotta use the breaker bar and that ratchet socket. Cumbersome, but it beats resetting the socket every third of a turn. Would LOVE a long handled ratchet, but don't trust non name brands.

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          • #6
            I assume, based on the lengths, you're looking for 1/2" drive ratchets. If you're working on tractors, you might thinking about sizing up to a 3/4" drive set. I bought one from Tekton and couldn't be happier.

            If you're committed to 1/2" drive, Tekton also makes a long handled 1/2" drive ratchet: https://www.tekton.com/long-quick-re...ve-size=1-2-in

            Tekton has a mix of made-in-USA and made-in-Taiwan tools but I have had positive experiences with them. They used to be really cheap, consumer grade tools but they have worked hard to re-invent themselves, essentially filling the void left when Craftsman became Crapsman. They aren't the best hand tools out there, but they are a great value and they have a lifetime warranty that (based on reviews I've read) is no-fuss, similar to the old Craftsman warranty. Only problem is that it does require you to send the tool in instead of going to a local store.

            I first heard about them thanks to Wierdscience here.

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            • #7
              Originally posted by David Powell View Post
              Over the years I managed to destroy a couple of ratchets with cheater bars. It is so very tempting to put a cheater on to undo a stubborn nut. I learnt from experience and now have a couple of long solid breaker bars. What would be the advantage of long ratchets?
              Regards David Powell.
              The only advantage to a long handle ratchet would be that you don't have to or "may" not have to use a cheater bar on a stubborn nut or bolt.
              As a kid I can remember them at some service stations, also remember seeing some where the handle was bent at the head. So I would imagine that the mfg's, started to put their thinking caps on and came to the conclusion that the handles provided more leverage than the ratchet head or drive could withstand. Now if the had any kind of guarantee on their tools which most do then I'm sure they had a lot of returns. So they smartened up and shortened up the handles. Now if someone used a cheater bar on the ratchet and broke it then they could say not covered by the warranty. If you need that much force to remove a stubborn nut then go to the next size up drive.

              The other issue with the long handles is space requirement. Try working with one under the hood of a car !

              My uncle had an "old" SK 1/2" drive with a long handle, I found it one day and the head was split open.

              JL..............

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              • #8
                Originally posted by Fasttrack View Post
                I assume, based on the lengths, you're looking for 1/2" drive ratchets. If you're working on tractors, you might thinking about sizing up to a 3/4" drive set. I bought one from Tekton and couldn't be happier.

                If you're committed to 1/2" drive, Tekton also makes a long handled 1/2" drive ratchet: https://www.tekton.com/long-quick-re...ve-size=1-2-in

                Tekton has a mix of made-in-USA and made-in-Taiwan tools but I have had positive experiences with them. They used to be really cheap, consumer grade tools but they have worked hard to re-invent themselves, essentially filling the void left when Craftsman became Crapsman. They aren't the best hand tools out there, but they are a great value and they have a lifetime warranty that (based on reviews I've read) is no-fuss, similar to the old Craftsman warranty. Only problem is that it does require you to send the tool in instead of going to a local store.

                I first heard about them thanks to Wierdscience here.
                That's a nice looking 24" ratchet for 45 bucks! I have a Snap On from twenty years ago but I think they cost about 200 bucks now, outrageous pricing these days. But that keeps new mechanics in debt for years.

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by vectorwarbirds View Post

                  That's a nice looking 24" ratchet for 45 bucks! I have a Snap On from twenty years ago but I think they cost about 200 bucks now, outrageous pricing these days. But that keeps new mechanics in debt for years.
                  I've got a mix of SnapOn, Armstron, Wright, Craftsman, and Tekton tools. Armstrong and Wright are definitely my favorite brands (Armstrong is no longer available) but it's hard to argue with Tekton's value. They're definitely a step above the crap I've seen at the big box stores but they don't cost that much more.

                  I know auto mechanics that are basically making mortgage sized payments to pay for their SnapOn tools

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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by David Powell View Post
                    Over the years I managed to destroy a couple of ratchets with cheater bars. It is so very tempting to put a cheater on to undo a stubborn nut. I learnt from experience and now have a couple of long solid breaker bars. What would be the advantage of long ratchets?
                    Regards David Powell.
                    On tractors.

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                    • #11
                      Originally posted by Fasttrack View Post
                      I assume, based on the lengths, you're looking for 1/2" drive ratchets. If you're working on tractors, you might thinking about sizing up to a 3/4" drive set. I bought one from Tekton and couldn't be happier.

                      If you're committed to 1/2" drive, Tekton also makes a long handled 1/2" drive ratchet: https://www.tekton.com/long-quick-re...ve-size=1-2-in

                      Tekton has a mix of made-in-USA and made-in-Taiwan tools but I have had positive experiences with them. They used to be really cheap, consumer grade tools but they have worked hard to re-invent themselves, essentially filling the void left when Craftsman became Crapsman. They aren't the best hand tools out there, but they are a great value and they have a lifetime warranty that (based on reviews I've read) is no-fuss, similar to the old Craftsman warranty. Only problem is that it does require you to send the tool in instead of going to a local store.

                      I first heard about them thanks to Wierdscience here.
                      I never cared for any of the snap on ratchets because of the smooth polished tapered handle. Their wrenches were the same. They belong in show cases ! not in tool boxes.

                      I've used them before, try gripping one with greasy oily hands. I think Craftsman handles were smooth too. Don''t know why they never knurled them. Someone have patent rights on a knurled handle??

                      JL................

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                      • #12
                        Getting worn out running long bolts in tight spots is why I bought an air ratchet. Now I'm looking to replace it with an electric version.

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                        • #13
                          I've been using one of these for 30 years, not cheap but durable. (only moderately abused,no 4' cheaters...)https://www.ebay.com/i/124157370662?...SABEgKcCPD_BwE
                          Jim

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                          • #14
                            Originally posted by Fasttrack View Post
                            I assume, based on the lengths, you're looking for 1/2" drive ratchets. If you're working on tractors, you might thinking about sizing up to a 3/4" drive set. I bought one from Tekton and couldn't be happier.............

                            If you're committed to 1/2" drive............
                            That is the thing to do.

                            The disadvantage is that there are not many SMALL sockets for the larger drives, but they do exist, and there are always adapters if you really need one, like getting a 3/4 drive down to 1/2". But you need to remember that smaller heads mean smaller threads, and it it reasonably easy to twist the head off a bolt with just the regular length handle in smaller sizes, let alone with a cheater or larger wrench. No advantage to a bolt that is twisted off, other than the pieces can come apart then.

                            Larger tools are also stronger. But NO ratchet is as strong as the matching breaker bar.... don't put the cheater on the ratchet, put it on the breaker bar.
                            CNC machines only go through the motions.

                            Ideas expressed may be mine, or from anyone else in the universe.
                            Not responsible for clerical errors. Or those made by lay people either.
                            Number formats and units may be chosen at random depending on what day it is.
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                            • #15
                              Originally posted by JoeLee View Post
                              I never cared for any of the snap on ratchets because of the smooth polished tapered handle. Their wrenches were the same. They belong in show cases ! not in tool boxes.
                              I've heard that compliant before and it's valid. Even with greasy hands (and believe me, there were days when I had ATF on every square inch of my body or days where it looked like was wearing black gloves due to the grease!), I still prefer the smooth handles. They can be slick, but if they are designed right they are still easy to keep in the hand. And they wipe up easier when I'm done. I've got an SK ratchet with a knurled handle but it never felt right in my hand and the knurls were always nasty from grease. My 3/4" ratchet from Tekton is also knurled, but it has a black oxide finish so at least it hides the grease

                              Just personal preference, I guess. Wright Tools offers their ratchets with knurled or smooth handles and their wrenches in satin or polished. I've been choosing the smooth / polished because that's what feels right in my hand, even when my hands are covered in muck.

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