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Which Import Mig welder do you have?

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  • Fasttrack
    replied
    Originally posted by sarge41 View Post

    Glad to know about the Weld-Kleen. I'm sure it works better than the spray silicone, but no more welding than I do these days, it wouldn't be worthwhile. speaking about the silicone, i don't use it on the weldment, only in the nose of the gun. Never had any problem with painting any weldment. Thanks for the info. Stay safe.
    Sarge41
    Oops - I missed the fact that you were talking about the tip only!

    Leave a comment:


  • sarge41
    replied
    Originally posted by Fasttrack View Post

    If I'm running a rod where spatter can be a problem (e.g. 6011) or using the flux core machine at work, I use Weld Kleen. If you buy it by the gallon, it's much cheaper than silicone spray and - more importantly - it's water soluble and leaves no residue after cleaning. Silicone spray probably works great but it's a PITA to clean off if you want to paint the weldment later.

    https://www.amazon.com/Weld-Aid-Weld...s%2C161&sr=8-3




    Thanks for the update, Wierdscience!
    Glad to know about the Weld-Kleen. I'm sure it works better than the spray silicone, but no more welding than I do these days, it wouldn't be worthwhile. speaking about the silicone, i don't use it on the weldment, only in the nose of the gun. Never had any problem with painting any weldment. Thanks for the info. Stay safe.
    Sarge41

    Leave a comment:


  • Fasttrack
    replied
    Originally posted by sarge41 View Post

    On edit; Another tip that is handy, use spray silicone on the tip before welding. After using, let cool then all the slag built up on the tip just wipes off.
    If I'm running a rod where spatter can be a problem (e.g. 6011) or using the flux core machine at work, I use Weld Kleen. If you buy it by the gallon, it's much cheaper than silicone spray and - more importantly - it's water soluble and leaves no residue after cleaning. Silicone spray probably works great but it's a PITA to clean off if you want to paint the weldment later.

    https://www.amazon.com/Weld-Aid-Weld...s%2C161&sr=8-3




    Thanks for the update, Wierdscience!

    Leave a comment:


  • sarge41
    replied
    I bought a Hobart 175 Handler about 20 years ago. Runs on 220-1 and the only thing that i have needed to replace was the hose for the gun. TSC was running a sale on them for about $720.00 at that time. After trying the wire with flux core, I went and bought a bottle of gas. The welder came with a regulator and hose. It has served me well, especially for thin metal. Another nice feature is if you have a need to build up a place to mill down, it does not leave undercut. Good luck.
    Sarge41

    On edit; Another tip that is handy, use spray silicone on the tip before welding. After using, let cool then all the slag built up on the tip just wipes off.

    Last edited by sarge41; 05-20-2021, 12:08 AM.

    Leave a comment:


  • boslab
    replied
    I’ve had a lot of luck with thermal arc, I think they are esab connected though not sure, I bought the three in one, an AC tig and 40A plasma set off them, the three came in less than the hypertherm cut40 that got stolen, I’m happy, heavy build, lots of US innards good machines ( I was happy they gave me a rotobroach panther FOC, I think the rep felt sorry for me when he saw my new empty shop organisational plan)
    mark

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  • wierdscience
    replied
    Originally posted by Fasttrack View Post

    Hey Wierdscience - did you end up buying one? Any reviews you want to share? Still thinking about getting something for myself and would appreciate hearing your thoughts.
    Not yet, ended up having some repair work on the house first, welder purchase is next. Still going to go with the Hobart when I do, hoping TSC will have a sale on them soon

    Leave a comment:


  • Fasttrack
    replied
    Originally posted by wierdscience View Post

    At the moment I'm leaning towards the Hobart 210. I watched a couple reviews on Youtube and they do look to have noticeably smoother transfer. Local store has several instock and usually there is a sale coming up after Thanksgiving.
    Hey Wierdscience - did you end up buying one? Any reviews you want to share? Still thinking about getting something for myself and would appreciate hearing your thoughts.

    Leave a comment:


  • JRouche
    replied
    "Which Import Mig welder do you have?"

    I dont know? Hobart. Is that there??


    What that fuk does import have to do with this place man!

    I have an old Hobart TIG Machine.

    I even went the third step and got or made the HF peddle. Yes, dial in frequency. I changed it from too high of a voltage to something safe,

    And usable. JR

    Leave a comment:


  • BigMike782
    replied
    A Millermatic 211 is a bench top style machine. 1st gen was a transformer, second generation is an inverter.
    If it was “full sized” it was a 210,212,251 or 252.
    My mig machine is a 252 with a Spoolmatic 30A or an XR Alumapro push pull. The vast majority of the welding I do is tig.

    Leave a comment:


  • Black Forest
    replied
    I also use Kemppi welding machines. I have two, a MIG and a TIG. The MIG is really handy because of the way it is built. It is built on a two wheel truck sort of frame. So standing up it is easy to adjust. It is not so expensive either. I have the 253r Kempact machine. Three phase 250 amps. It has a really nice arc and welds like a dream. As much welding as you do Wierdscience I would think you would buy a good welder and not a cheapo Chinese import. Of course my Kemppi welders are imports as they come from Finland and I live in Germany.

    Leave a comment:


  • wierdscience
    replied
    Originally posted by garyhlucas View Post
    I have an HF Titanium 170 which is dual voltage 120/240 and I am impressed with how well it welds with flux core, as I don't plan on getting a gas tank. All the inverter machines I have run are way smoother than transformer machines due to the higher frequency and lower ripple DC they put out. It appears nicely built and the wire feed mechanism is all metal but I have no ide of course how long it might last. I don't weld a lot so it should be fine.
    One of the guys at work has one of the Everlast inverter stick welders. It's amazingly smooth and surprisingly powerful for a welder not much bigger than a toaster oven.

    Leave a comment:


  • wierdscience
    replied
    Originally posted by junkaddict View Post

    I had a Diversion 180, just out of warranty, bad board, $1200. I opted not to fix it, and not to buy another Miller. When the mig dies, it will not be replaced by a Miller either.
    Do you still have it? If so, these people bailed me out the last time I have Miller board problems-

    https://www.controlrepair.com/manufa...-electric/2096

    Leave a comment:


  • garyhlucas
    replied
    I have an HF Titanium 170 which is dual voltage 120/240 and I am impressed with how well it welds with flux core, as I don't plan on getting a gas tank. All the inverter machines I have run are way smoother than transformer machines due to the higher frequency and lower ripple DC they put out. It appears nicely built and the wire feed mechanism is all metal but I have no ide of course how long it might last. I don't weld a lot so it should be fine.

    Leave a comment:


  • flathead4
    replied
    Originally posted by DennisCA View Post
    A Kemppi, from your POV it would be an import.
    Mine is a Kemppi as well. It was imported at one time of course, but I bought from my younger brother who was a distributor for Kemppi in the US years ago. It's been a good machine for me but honestly I have used it more for DC stick and scratch TIG. A couple years ago I bought a nearly new Arc Pig off eBay and added HF start/run to my TIG setup.

    Click image for larger version

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  • junkaddict
    replied
    Originally posted by wierdscience View Post

    Yup,and I generally like the Miller stuff I have at work, though none of it is newer than 2005. Biggest reason I am hesitant to buy Miller this time, is their service centers local to me have two standard answers-

    #1 "The board is shot, it would be cheaper to buy a new welder"
    #2 "4-6 weeks"
    I had a Diversion 180, just out of warranty, bad board, $1200. I opted not to fix it, and not to buy another Miller. When the mig dies, it will not be replaced by a Miller either.

    Leave a comment:

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