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  • #16
    I've been using a Jet 4x6 horizontal bandsaw for cutting most material under 4" OD or so and a 1960's Craftsman 14-in vertical bandsaw (with gearbox for metal cutting speeds) for cutting plate but that saw is really underpowered for the purpose and I've just upgraded that to a Roll-in EF-1459 with gravity feed.
    Click image for larger version  Name:	Roll-in EF-1459.jpg Views:	0 Size:	1.40 MB ID:	1909183

    Looking forward to trying it out after it gets delivered in a week or two. If I had a lot stock to cut in a small production shop environment I might consider the Tormach saw:

    https://tormach.com/machines/bandsaws.html
    Attached Files
    Mike Henry near Chicago

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    • #17
      I'd love to see a close up of the blade guide on that Rollin. Rather than the typical 2 bearings in the same horizontal plane that are adjusted for closeness to the blade by eccentrics or other means, it looks like by just swinging the 2 guides on a pivot you can set the clearance. Simple and effective. What I don't see clearly is if those are even bearings or merely pieces of round stock, or how any thrust against the back side of the blade is handled.

      I have started making blade guides for a vertical band saw, and this seems much simpler that anything I've come up with. Also wondering what the lower guide looks like.
      "A machinist's (WHAP!) best friend (WHAP! WHAP!) is his hammer. (WHAP!)" - Fred Tanner, foreman, Lunenburg Foundry and Engineering machine shop, circa 1979

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      • #18
        We have one of those Rollin saws at work, it is only used to cut cardboard tubes though. I never took a good look at the guide wheels.

        There is a hydraulic damper on the side that adjusts the feed rate, I can’t remember what the cost was but it is available and they are pretty proud of it based on the price.

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        • #19
          Originally posted by mickeyf View Post
          I'd love to see a close up of the blade guide on that Rollin. Rather than the typical 2 bearings in the same horizontal plane that are adjusted for closeness to the blade by eccentrics or other means, it looks like by just swinging the 2 guides on a pivot you can set the clearance. Simple and effective. What I don't see clearly is if those are even bearings or merely pieces of round stock, or how any thrust against the back side of the blade is handled.

          I have started making blade guides for a vertical band saw, and this seems much simpler that anything I've come up with. Also wondering what the lower guide looks like.
          Hey Mickey. I'll get you a photo sometime if Mike doesn't beat me to it.

          You are correct. The guides are rotated on a pivot centered between the two rollers. The clearance is actually negative clearance. As the blade is twisted, when it comes off the wheel it still has a 45 degree tendency of course. With the bearings set closely the blade still will be turned a slight amount. By setting them negative, the blade must run true. Hence the offset. At least that's my understanding.

          The rollers have internal bearings I believe. That or it's in the guide housing. I haven't taken them apart. Roll-in is pretty proud of them as well. There is a flange on the outside shell to take the thrust force. There is an identical guide below the table.
          21" Royersford Excelsior CamelBack Drillpress Restoration
          1943 Sidney 16x54 Lathe Restoration

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          • #20
            Click image for larger version

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ID:	1909256 I Bought an Enco 7x12 about 12 years ago, on sale for $800.00 delivered. I really didn’t know I needed a bandsaw till I got this one. Now its one of my favorite tools, cut perfect out of the box. I was testing it out cut a wafer off of a piece of 5“ stock. The rings in the foto are 4“ steel pipe one cut square and the other at 45* angle, try that with na abrasive saw.Click image for larger version

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            • #21
              Originally posted by mickeyf View Post
              I'd love to see a close up of the blade guide on that Rollin. Rather than the typical 2 bearings in the same horizontal plane that are adjusted for closeness to the blade by eccentrics or other means, it looks like by just swinging the 2 guides on a pivot you can set the clearance. Simple and effective. What I don't see clearly is if those are even bearings or merely pieces of round stock, or how any thrust against the back side of the blade is handled.
              I have a Rollin and that is how the guides are adjusted. However the set screw that locks the swinging guide bearings bracket in place in located near the center of rotation, so with a little wear or a dimple from the set screw it always wants to return back to where it was regardless of where you put it or how tight you wrenched on that screw.
              It really needs an arm off the shaft to get the fastening point farther from the center of rotation.

              The rollers are basically cam follower bearings with a shoulder to support the back of the blade.
              They are also grooved for various widths blades. The blade teeth fall into their respective groove so the teeth don't contact the bearings.

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              • #22
                I have a 1980's era Startrite H175 horizontal/vertical bandsaw that's my go to machine. I've had it over 20 years and it's still going strong. It was purchased from a local shop that needed a larger machine. The only thing I've had to do to it in all the time I've had it is replace the blade few times, and put on a new set of blade guide bearings. Startrite's are made in England, but sold and supported by Clausing in the US.

                There are currently several larger models listed on eBay, but the prices are outrageous. There are also a few different brands listed on our local Craigslist, but again the prices are out of this world. Saws that were selling for $1,000.00 to $1,500.00 a few months ago now have an asking price of $3,500.00 to $6,500.00
                Attached Files

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                • #23
                  Mine is a gearhead 7x10 vertical/horizontal mitering bandsaw made by Vectrax in Taiwan. Has been an awesome machine. Shown in the foreground, on the left. Also have a vertical 18" Vectrax (shown on the right) whose 3-phase controls are not yet completed.



                  12" x 35" Logan 2557V lathe
                  Index "Super 55" mill
                  18" Vectrax vertical bandsaw
                  7" x 10" Vectrax mitering bandsaw
                  24" State disc sander

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                  • #24
                    The clearance is actually negative clearance. As the blade is twisted, when it comes off the wheel it still has a 45 degree tendency of course.
                    Ah, makes sense. But the pure vertical saw I am working on now (convert from wood cutting saw) does not have a 45 degree twist, so the only advantage in my case might be the simplicity.
                    "A machinist's (WHAP!) best friend (WHAP! WHAP!) is his hammer. (WHAP!)" - Fred Tanner, foreman, Lunenburg Foundry and Engineering machine shop, circa 1979

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                    • #25
                      I have the 4x6, mine is a CII, made in Taiwan. It's been good all these years and still going strong. I did lots of work on the blade guides to make them work properly- also with the adjustable fence. The one benefit it had from new was the pivot bar was actually parallel to the table. Has the original motor still, and I converted to a link belt. If I don't abuse the blade it cuts straight, and I resist the tendency to adjust the machine if the cut starts to go off square. A new blade always brings it back to straight cutting. I think this is important to note, because for me at least I'd go nuts trying to keep it cutting square when what's really happening is the blade gets dull on one side and that's what causes the problem. In the end, the real limitation for me is that it's only a 4x6.

                      I would love to have a roll in saw- I have the materials on hand to build one, and I have the plans- I just don't have the room, and so that project has languished.
                      I seldom do anything within the scope of logical reason and calculated cost/benefit, etc- I'm following my passion-

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                      • #26
                        Originally posted by mickeyf View Post
                        I'd love to see a close up of the blade guide on that Rollin. Rather than the typical 2 bearings in the same horizontal plane that are adjusted for closeness to the blade by eccentrics or other means, it looks like by just swinging the 2 guides on a pivot you can set the clearance. Simple and effective. What I don't see clearly is if those are even bearings or merely pieces of round stock, or how any thrust against the back side of the blade is handled.

                        I have started making blade guides for a vertical band saw, and this seems much simpler that anything I've come up with. Also wondering what the lower guide looks like.
                        It will get delivered in a week or two and I can get you a closeup then if no one has responded by then. The manual that I found on-line is not exactly detailed for adjusting the blade guide but I'm one those that needs to get hands on to really understand how mechanical things work.


                        Mike Henry near Chicago

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                        • #27
                          MikeHenry Don't go to any trouble on my account. I just this morning finished the last blade guide on my band saw project, installed and tested it, so I'm not liable to change the design any time soon as long as it keeps working. This is converted from a 14" wood cutting band saw, so there is no twist to the blades - they come straight off the wheels square to the table. I did borrow the idea of adjusting the rollers by swinging them on a pivot rather than sliding them in a slot or using an eccentric, either of which would have been a bit more work.
                          Last edited by mickeyf; 11-15-2020, 09:49 PM.
                          "A machinist's (WHAP!) best friend (WHAP! WHAP!) is his hammer. (WHAP!)" - Fred Tanner, foreman, Lunenburg Foundry and Engineering machine shop, circa 1979

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                          • #28
                            I have a Grizzly 4x6 and, for my shop, it is at least adequate. It certainly beats sawing by hand or using a jigsaw.

                            I have seen larger, probably name brand horizontal saws in action and did not see where they did any better or faster job than my 4x6 does on stock that would fit in it's envelope (4" x 6"). I find that the biggest difference in performance is due to the blade used. A good blade makes even an inexpensive saw work great.

                            I have limited space in my shop so I probably could not fit a vertical band saw in addition to a horizontal. So I find the horizontal and vertical capability of the 4x6 design a definite plus. Yes, I know it is quite limited in it's ability to handle work in the vertical position and the supplied table is small. But still, it does work and I often don't even bother putting the table on it. And some of the uses for a vertical band saw can be handled by a jig saw with a metal cutting blade, mounted in a router table: that is a capability that I already have. In fact, for some uses, this is a better way as it does not have the limitation of the throat of a vertical band saw.

                            So, what would I look for in a band saw? Well, you didn't even say vertical or horizontal. So I have to assume horizontal. In a horizontal band saw I would look first for the work envelope. That 4x6 is quite limiting and even in my small shop I have run into those limits a few times. A larger work envelope would be very nice.

                            Than there is the question of coolant. I would want the use of coolant to be built in. And a good collection tray would be high on my mind. Not just below the point where the actual cut is made, but also for drips from the band and wheels.

                            The next thing would be the accuracy of the cut. Is it square? Don't laugh, I have seen crooked cuts and not just on my 4x6. Probably bad blades, but I would still want a saw that does cut straight with a good blade.

                            The speed of cutting: I guess this would be related to the power as well as the blade used, but may also depend on the mechanism that regulates the pressure on the blade. This can also have an effect on the accuracy of the cut so I would want an effective and easy to adjust mechanism.

                            Much has been said and written about the stand that is provided with most brands of the 4x6 which is usually made of sheet metal. I have found the stand of my Grizzly 4x6 to be adequate for the work that I have done, but in a larger saw I would want something more substantial. The stand would be something that I would look at closely.
                            Paul A.
                            SE Texas

                            Make it fit.
                            You can't win and there IS a penalty for trying!

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                            • #29
                              I have a 16" wood bandsaw which I have added a third shaft to in order to bring the speed down to the correct speed for cutting metal. It works very well, but I have stood for hours at that thing cutting steel, aluminum, and brass, and each time thinking how nice it would be to have a "roll-in" style bandsaw which would self feed while I done other things.
                              Brian Rupnow
                              Design engineer
                              Barrie, Ontario, Canada

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                              • #30
                                Originally posted by brian Rupnow View Post
                                I have a 16" wood bandsaw which I have added a third shaft to in order to bring the speed down to the correct speed for cutting metal. It works very well, but I have stood for hours at that thing cutting steel, aluminum, and brass, and each time thinking how nice it would be to have a "roll-in" style bandsaw which would self feed while I done other things.
                                This setup is not a walk away like horizontal or roll in style but sure works great for straight or contouring.It is a simple adjustable counter weight that pulls your work into blade.With your talent I’m sure you could build one for your vertical 🙂 Click image for larger version

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