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Show me how please,,, the classic little Railroad rail anvil.

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  • #31
    Originally posted by Ringo View Post

    yes, that is sort of what I had in mind, but how to hold at the chuck end. Looks like he did it between centers.
    True it wouldn't be much more than a light bench anvil, or, gunsmith bench block type of thing.
    Use a headstock center and 2 jaws in a 4 jaw. Center holes should be collinear of course.
    21" Royersford Excelsior CamelBack Drillpress Restoration
    1943 Sidney 16x54 Lathe Restoration

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    • #32
      There are many types of anvil horns. The London pattern pictured above has a rounded horn. But go check out a Nimba anvil to see a more geometric type horn.

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      • #33
        Originally posted by Doozer View Post

        .
        I know all you machinist are OCD, impaired by
        the pursuit of perfection. Questions of how to
        propagate the psychosis are not something
        everyone wants to get involved with.

        -Doozer
        I like to encourage it, reading the responses brings hours of entertainment (-:

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        • #34
          Hey, if you want one, and will pay postage, I have one that is taking up space..... I'll add a pic. It's not THAT heavy, likely work in a larger flat rate box.

          Could use a bit of cleanup, but the price is right.
          3751 6193 2700 3517

          Keep eye on ball.
          Hashim Khan

          If you look closely at a digital signal, you find out it is really analog......

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          • #35
            Originally posted by 754 View Post
            mount it on a rotary table on a mill, at angle desired, or angle the rotary table, support tip with foot stock . Start cutting..
            This sounds like the safest and most doable, for me anyway. For the cone. Do you have a rototab and adjustable ange plate? Angle plate to get the compound angle on the horn.

            Mount it end down on rototab and make nice shallow cuts around and around till its a horn? Maybe ball nose cutter? JR

            My old yahoo group. Bridgeport Mill Group

            https://groups.yahoo.com/neo/groups/...port_mill/info

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            • #36
              Originally posted by JRouche View Post

              This sounds like the safest and most doable, for me anyway. For the cone. Do you have a rototab and adjustable ange plate? Angle plate to get the compound angle on the horn.

              Mount it end down on rototab and make nice shallow cuts around and around till its a horn? Maybe ball nose cutter? JR
              Just end mill it.... series of flat cuts, ...then blend by sanding it out.
              I should mention , if you have never done a large cone , on a lathe, with interrupted cut....it is a slow process , even on a medium size lathe..
              interrupted cut on mill hand feeding ..easier to deal with..
              in the end ..fair amount of work if you want a nice taper.... but it will likely end up with less useability than many anvils..

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              • #37
                Why are you guys insisting on machining an anvil? The method shown in the video looked perfectly reasonable to me, but wait till the neighbours are out before all that disc cutting, plus you'll end up with loads of dust and a pile of worn out discs. Its very like how I did mine, though a friend with a cutting torch got it roughly to shape for me. I didn't pretty mine up as much. In fact I didn't pretty it up at all, after all its something to hammer things on, not a dining room ornament.
                'It may not always be the best policy to do what is best technically, but those responsible for policy can never form a right judgement without knowledge of what is right technically' - 'Dutch' Kindelberger

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                • #38
                  I thought you all knew that in Switzerland, all the railway lines are painted by the same people who make the cuckoo clocks.

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                  • #39
                    the best comment thus far:

                    "after all its something to hammer things on, not a dining room ornament."

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                    • #40
                      Lathe? Forget it unless you have a God awful big one.

                      Mill? Well, I can see some cutting there if you really want to do it. Without CNC (liner cuts only) it would take many set-ups.

                      I have not made one, but I think these anvils are mostly made with hand tools and hand held power tools. This is a blacksmith tool and I suspect you need to look around a black smith shop to see the tools used. That may include the muscular blacksmith himself.

                      As for the tapered shape of the horn end, that is probably finished with things like angle grinders, belt sanders, and files. I would be looking for a belt sander with a long, unsupported stretch between two rollers. And enough slack in the belt to form a bit of an arc where it contacts the work. Glass shops use a belt sander like this to put the rounded edge on things like mirrors.

                      And remember, I mentioned the muscles of the blacksmith. Either the anvil or the tools are going to be heavy and one or the other is going to be in your hands.

                      I guess CNC on the mill could be made to do it. But I would not want to be the one to write the code. Perhaps you could work from a 3D model. That would be a lot easier.

                      No matter how you shape it, I would think that a final, heat treatment would be in order. Probably for a surface hardening, but not too hard.
                      Last edited by Paul Alciatore; 11-03-2020, 07:27 PM.
                      Paul A.
                      SE Texas

                      And if you look REAL close at an analog signal,
                      You will find that it has discrete steps.

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                      • #41
                        If he would have used a grinder to shape it, it would be done by now.

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                        • #42
                          Originally posted by Ringo View Post

                          I have seen RR track with the top edge mushroomed over a bit. If the RR welds their tracks, then I have some amount of doubt that track is really really hard, or, really really high alloy.
                          I mean, weldable out in the field type welds.
                          It has suprisingly high carbon, afaik around 0.8% so it is close to 1080 high carbon steel. Some grades even above 1%
                          http://eprints.hud.ac.uk/id/eprint/3...17%20Final.pdf
                          Location: Helsinki, Finland, Europe

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                          • #43
                            Ringo, just because an alloy us difficult to weld, does not mean there us not a process to do so.

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                            • #44
                              Originally posted by Ringo View Post

                              yes, that is sort of what I had in mind, but how to hold at the chuck end. Looks like he did it between centers.
                              True it wouldn't be much more than a light bench anvil, or, gunsmith bench block type of thing.
                              Right at 4:59 when he finally turns off the lathe and just before they pan in to the horn again we can see that it is mounted in a 3 jaw chuck. That leads me to assume that they welded on a round stub. Possibly a "barrel" shaped stub so it would not be fussy as to the angle when gripped. But still aligned reasonably well all the same during the welding to the rail. The whole thing then being allowed to be pushed against the fronts of the jaws by the tail stock pressure.

                              Notice in the video as well that a lot of the excess metal was removed ahead of time You can see that by the shadowed step of the base flange flying around. The lathe turning of the horn being only the last step.

                              All in all if you're doing all that cutting already I think I'd just go ahead and keep going with the zip discs or bandsawing used to rough out the horn end and just keep at it until done. I'd go that way because I'm on the side of the discussion that has suggested that the best shape for the horn is not really a straight cone. Instead I'd want a more curved horn which sweeps up so the top edge is straight but the sides and lower lines are a progressive and more organic sort of curve. We get more support that way for more aggressive use. More of the "whack" would be reflected into the work instead of deflecting the skinnier horn.

                              And for finer work where a true conical taper would be better I'd turn a finer straight taper or two that could be held by some suitable manner in my big vise.

                              Chilliwack BC, Canada

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                              • #45
                                Originally posted by Ringo View Post

                                I have seen RR track with the top edge mushroomed over a bit. If the RR welds their tracks, then I have some amount of doubt that track is really really hard, or, really really high alloy.
                                I mean, weldable out in the field type welds.
                                The rails I've seen here all used joiner plates. And in summer there's almost no gap and in winter there's a gap which generates a considerably bigger "click-click" as the cars go over the joints.

                                I always thought that was just normally how it was done. But a few years ago a thread on "thermite welding" led me to look at some videos of the process. And many of them were related to welding rail tracks. Like this one.... I'm still not sure how it deals with warm to cold thermal expansion....

                                https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5uxsFglz2ig

                                Chilliwack BC, Canada

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