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Show me how please,,, the classic little Railroad rail anvil.

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  • #46
    Originally posted by Ringo View Post
    the best comment thus far:

    "after all its something to hammer things on, not a dining room ornament."
    Well Ringo. Some folks take pride in the items they make. We are not all a bunch of greasy machinist just trying to get that nut. JR

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    • #47
      Originally posted by BCRider View Post

      The rails I've seen here all used joiner plates. And in summer there's almost no gap and in winter there's a gap which generates a considerably bigger "click-click" as the cars go over the joints.

      I always thought that was just normally how it was done. But a few years ago a thread on "thermite welding" led me to look at some videos of the process. And many of them were related to welding rail tracks. Like this one.... I'm still not sure how it deals with warm to cold thermal expansion....

      https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5uxsFglz2ig
      Tension/tie down the living sh*t out of the them and there is no thermal expansion, just stress.
      Location: Helsinki, Finland, Europe

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      • #48


        Originally posted by BCRider View Post

        The rails I've seen here all used joiner plates. And in summer there's almost no gap and in winter there's a gap which generates a considerably bigger "click-click" as the cars go over the joints.
        The UP uses welded rails, which come in on a special train in sections that look about 1000' long (many cars long, the rails take up the whole train length. They slide them off the train one after the other along the track they are replacing. The long lengths look like spaghetti the way they bend. Those sections are welded (some places they do use plates, apparently).

        The rail anvil pics It weighs about 13 lb on my 50 lb shop scale:



        CNC machines only go through the motions

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        • #49
          Ok. I read the OPs post, and I read some of the back and forth.

          The first thing is to see how work hardened it is. I was told that due to a large percentage of manganese track tends to work harden pretty hard and pretty fast despite being relatively low carbon. If you are not going to use cut off wheels and grinding wheels then you need to anneal it. Start by throwing it in a big bonfire and let it burn out and cool over night. One of Tom Nobles famous keg parties in the desert might do if its not one where he has added illegally salvaged parachute flares to the bonfire. After burning his truck to the ground I think he quit doing the flare trick.

          Its possible you could do some "hard milling" but that's a whole-nuther thing.

          Then its a matter of a whole bunch of setups. The hardy hole and the surface aren't a huge deal. Neither is a pritchel hole. The horn is going to be a compromise. If you look at some classic horned anvils the main horn (double horns may be different on the second)the horn is a very organic shape. Usually a bent tapered cone that has a swell along its length for about 3/4 of its diameter, but not the top which often has no swell or a negative swell. I could design and CNC a shape like that, but I doubt I could do it on a manual mill other than just rough basic material removal prior to grinding by hand.

          Good luck. If I didn't have a CNC mill I'd use cut off wheels and grinding wheels.
          *** I always wanted a welding stinger that looked like the north end of a south bound chicken. Often my welds look like somebody pointed the wrong end of a chicken at the joint and squeezed until something came out. Might as well look the part.

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          • #50
            Don't underestimate the angle grinder:
            https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ISjD...therFinnishguy

            I have no idea who the guy is despite his youtube user name
            Location: Helsinki, Finland, Europe

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