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O/T: Chess. I love chess. No one to play?

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  • metalmagpie
    replied
    I recommend the recent Netflix series "The Queen's Gambit" to everyone but especially if you like chess. - metalmagpie

    Leave a comment:


  • JRouche
    replied
    Originally posted by mklotz View Post
    If you can't find opponents easily, you can still improve your play a great deal by solving chess problems.

    Here's one to try...

    Set up a situation on the board where white is in check and his only legal move to cancel the check checkmates black. It's called a helpless mate.
    I am lazy. I would have to set my board up to figure it out!! Err. Will Do. Give me some time.

    Sorry. So sorry for the late response. I just saw this. Got piled p.

    Thank you ahead of time before I go see this.

    And any invitation to play chess online via VP would be cool.

    Ill kick ass

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  • JRouche
    replied
    Originally posted by J Tiers View Post

    The key to chess is to ELIMINATE variables and concentrate on the best possible moves, or at least the better ones, if rvaluating the opponent's choices. All the things that are not advantageous get eliminated. Of course, then if the opponent does them anyway, you know what to do.
    The way I play is probably not conventional because I never read a book on it or was never taught.

    I do have some standard opening moves and then its just cat and mouse. My plan? do NOT make a mistake, that will get you dead. To not make mistakes is the easiest for me. I play defense almost exclusively.

    Moves ahead? Varies. Hard for me to do when the board is still full. After about half empty I will have one or two strategy's with a few moves planned ahead. Not always. JR

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  • J Tiers
    replied
    Originally posted by A.K. Boomer View Post
    ...........

    I have the utmost respect for anyone that is really good at it, to see that far ahead with all the variables is truly amazing...
    The key to chess is to ELIMINATE variables and concentrate on the best possible moves, or at least the better ones, if rvaluating the opponent's choices. All the things that are not advantageous get eliminated. Of course, then if the opponent does them anyway, you know what to do.

    Leave a comment:


  • A.K. Boomer
    replied
    What a great game --- me and my brothers used to play a fair amount but have not played in decades, they used to beat me all the time cuz my attention span was lacking --- then for a few years I really did try to take it seriously --- seemed to be winning maybe half the time but took too much brain power and just wanted to be happy so went back to drinking and chasing skirts... lol

    I have the utmost respect for anyone that is really good at it, to see that far ahead with all the variables is truly amazing...

    Leave a comment:


  • JRouche
    replied
    [QUOTE=mklotz;n1908233]

    Have you actually read and understood the rules ?

    Can you answer these questions...

    How should the board be azimuthally oriented relative to the players ?

    White square right corner

    What are the rules for castling ?

    Certain time pieriod


    What is pawn promotion and the rules governing it ?

    Dont know



    How does a piece become pinned ?

    Dont know

    What is a knight fork ?

    Dont know

    How do you capture en passant ?

    Diagonally



    Leave a comment:


  • JoeLee
    replied
    I used to love to play chess when I was a kid. Only problem was no one else new how to play anything other than checkers !

    Didn't have computers to play against back then.

    JL.............

    Leave a comment:


  • mklotz
    replied
    Originally posted by JRouche View Post

    Yes. I waited for a move and there were none, cept for the code stuff which I apparently need to learn.

    So black went out first. Queen and King in the wrong spot was a faux pas. JR
    Have you actually read and understood the rules ?

    Can you answer these questions...

    How should the board be azimuthally oriented relative to the players ?

    What are the rules for castling ?

    What is pawn promotion and the rules governing it ?

    How does a piece become pinned ?

    What is a knight fork ?

    How do you capture en passant ?

    Leave a comment:


  • JRouche
    replied
    Originally posted by DrMike View Post
    Well, there's a problem already... in chess, white moves first.
    Yes. I waited for a move and there were none, cept for the code stuff which I apparently need to learn.

    So black went out first. Queen and King in the wrong spot was a faux pas. JR

    Leave a comment:


  • Joel
    replied
    Originally posted by Danl View Post
    It seems to me that chess masters and grandmasters must have super memories.
    I am not sure if it is so much a superior memory as the intricacies of the game just 'make sense' to those with that particular gift. They see it fundamentally different that I do, that much is crystal clear. Relate it to things that you are particularly and naturally good at. For me, those things are simply clear to me, despite the fact that there often seems little logic behind that fact.


    I am reminded of the movie 'Searching for Bobby Fischer', which is a good movie about a young chess prodigy (apparently pretty accurately based on a true story) - worth the watch.

    Leave a comment:


  • Arcane
    replied
    Originally posted by J Tiers View Post
    There are a huge number of "known openings" in chess. They vary in approach widely. A knowledge of at least a couple dozen common ones prevents easy losses.
    Back in 1972 or so I worked with a man from one of the European countries (forget which one now) who said he was once the chess champion of his country and not only did he know those huge number of openings, he could set up the chess board to show what it was anytime during a game.

    As an aside, to see him you'd never suspect he was such an accomplished chess player. Huge extremely strong man with hands twice the size of normal man's! At the mill where we worked we would have to regularly clean up spillage from the crushed rock that contained the asbestos. The rest of us would use square mouth spades because a shovel full was quite heavy but he'd use a big scoop shovel and shovel like it was snow and not finely crushed rock.

    Leave a comment:


  • skunkworks
    replied
    No.. more like calculating your fuel so you end up with 1 gallon left when you land. (based on 12 stops and weather conditions...)

    Originally posted by RB211 View Post

    How about an impossible to please Korean check airman?

    Leave a comment:


  • Danl
    replied
    Correct, and dozens of variations as the game progresses. It seems to me that chess masters and grandmasters must have super memories. Some chess prodigies have, in their youth, played many simultaneous games, blindfolded, and won most with a few draws and no losses. Sheesh....

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  • J Tiers
    replied
    There are a huge number of "known openings" in chess. They vary in approach widely. A knowledge of at least a couple dozen common ones prevents easy losses.

    Leave a comment:


  • nickel-city-fab
    replied
    Could play, but it has been decades, and I wasn't very good back then either. Thank you for posting this! it made me smile. And yes, I always move my pawn out first if possible.

    Leave a comment:

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