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Wood or plastic cases for 1-2-3 & 2-4-6 blocks?

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  • Wood or plastic cases for 1-2-3 & 2-4-6 blocks?

    The cardboard boxes mine came in have been duct-taped together for the last time. Anybody know of a source? What little Google-Fu I had has apparently left me.

    Yes, I can make some wood boxes but no, I really don't need yet another project right now.
    Milton

    "Accuracy is the sum total of your compensating mistakes."

    "The thing I hate about an argument is that it always interrupts a discussion." G. K. Chesterton

  • #2
    Given the fact that they're rectangular solids, making boxes should be easy.

    Degrease, then wax the blocks (so glue won't stick). Glue some scraps of wood around bottom and four adjacent sides. Once dry, bandsaw excess off, tack on a top, bandsaw it to size. Add closures. Done.
    Regards, Marv

    Home Shop Freeware - Tools for People Who Build Things
    http://www.myvirtualnetwork.com/mklotz

    Location: LA, CA, USA

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    • #3
      Thanks Marv; a nice & easy solution.
      Milton

      "Accuracy is the sum total of your compensating mistakes."

      "The thing I hate about an argument is that it always interrupts a discussion." G. K. Chesterton

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      • #4
        Flambeau Zerust boxes-

        https://www.flambeauoutdoors.com/Fis...ith-zerust-483
        I just need one more tool,just one!

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        • #5
          Tupperware containers.
          Brian Rupnow
          Design engineer
          Barrie, Ontario, Canada

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          • #6
            Should the title be: Well fitted.... or Closely fitting protective cases for .......
            Removes any confusion leading to someone suggesting an old cigar box or a plastic container from the Chinese take-away.

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            • #7
              Go with wood, even if you have to make them. The plastic stuff always gives out after a few years, but I've got wood cases over 50 yrs old holding up just fine.
              Southwest Utah

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              • #8
                I've always made my boxes out of walnut. I save all my scrap pieces from my furniture projects for boxes for special tools.


                JL...............

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                • #9
                  I just made these. Pretty simple and quick, something I have been wanting to do for a long time.
                  You may only view thumbnails in this gallery. This gallery has 1 photos.

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                  • #10
                    Brian, have you seen what actual Tupperware costs these days ! ? ! ? ! ? ! ? I'd say a trip to the food container of any big box store or a dollar store would be a more frugal alternative.

                    I'd be all for a food container solution myself. Quick and easy and you can see what is in them.

                    But a wooden box does not need to be a full day job either.

                    If you do fancy boxes then things can take quite a while to make. But a quicky solution like Marv pointed out done with some cheaper thin plywood can often do just fine. And hot glue or 5 minute epoxy makes short work of the assembly. But really some masking tape and regular wood glue will sit and dry just fine. So you can make it up and walk away to do something else.

                    The trick is having a table saw or some other way to cut up some plywood quickly. One strip wide enough for the bottom and two ends. A second strip that is sized for the end to end length and top. So bottom and ends all glue to the inside faces of the two sides. This makes for a box with minimal cutting needed as lots of the parts share the same sizes. The top comes out of the same strip as the sides because the idea is to make a sliding top so it needs to be a little wider than the bottom and ends.

                    Forget any hardware as this is supposed to be fast and cheap. Instead a couple of extra passes of the parts through the table saw and you have a sliding top in a groove like the boxes by bikr above.

                    I made 7 or 8 such boxes years ago. And they served well until discarded when I changed everything over to being openly stored in drawers in the new shop digs. But I still have one which is shown below.

                    I had a bunch of the EPP foam at the time so it was about an extra 8 or 10 minutes to carve out the compartment liner for bits that went into the box. But hot glue and a few sized scraps of plywood also works just fine as an alternative.




                    Click image for larger version

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                    Chilliwack BC, Canada

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                    • #11
                      If possible always line wood boxes with plastic. Although you may open it every week and oil it there will come a time when you are too old and frail to lift it off the shelf let alone use it. Then the wood gets damp and the rust starts.

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                      • #12
                        Originally posted by Baz View Post
                        If possible always line wood boxes with plastic. Although you may open it every week and oil it there will come a time when you are too old and frail to lift it off the shelf let alone use it. Then the wood gets damp and the rust starts.
                        Maybe.

                        But I have gotten a couple of wood boxes, one with tooling still in it. The tooling was quite good, no rust. And it was just stored for years, in no particularly great place, I think it was a garage.

                        Wood seems to cut down the condensation, and moderate the humidity.

                        The other box was near a fire in a garage at a relative's, and got wet and hot, not burnt at all. The tooling in it was not badly damaged, despite the wet and hot and of course having to sit there potentially rusting until the insurance guy arrived. When I got the box, I had to take it completely apart, because the damp and heat from the fire had "started" many of the joints.

                        You'd think the stuff would be a rusty lump after that, but very little was rusty, and that was "new rust" from the steaming it had got. The relative kept the tooling, but gave me the box. It had been stored for many years in the garage also.

                        I have seen metal toolboxes that seemed to get tools rusty in a relatively short time. I am beginning to think wood is a good idea.
                        3751 6193 2700 3517

                        Keep eye on ball.
                        Hashim Khan

                        If you look closely at a digital signal, you find out it is really analog......

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                        • #13
                          Given rusting I spray with wd and wrap with pallet wrap film these days, keeps the damp off, I swear it’s permanently raining
                          Mark

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                          • #14
                            Originally posted by wierdscience View Post
                            My shop is full of those. Started with threading dies then everything that would fit JR

                            My old yahoo group. Bridgeport Mill Group

                            https://groups.yahoo.com/neo/groups/...port_mill/info

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                            • #15
                              Originally posted by J Tiers View Post
                              .....I have seen metal toolboxes that seemed to get tools rusty in a relatively short time. I am beginning to think wood is a good idea.
                              I'm with you on this.

                              Wood is a darn good insulator as well as being decently structural. So it's no surprise to me that it will reduce the temperature swings quite well and even protect the contents from a fire that didn't actually burn the box in that story.

                              And if care is taken to produce nice fitted joints to where opening and closing the drawers causes an air cushion effect I've no doubt as well that it'll spread out humidity changes too. And if we can slow down temperature and humidity swings the metal runs a far better chance of not corroding.

                              Chilliwack BC, Canada

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