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Proper storage of lubricating oil and solvents? (Have insurance inspection)

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  • #46
    Originally posted by gellfex View Post

    I had a new boiler in a house 8 years ago and they ran a 50' new line from the meter of 1" yellow jacket stainless. Permits and city inspected. It uses a compression fitting to the old metal, seems to me conduction should be continuous, but apparently there are issues. Gonna look into it.

    Edit: so apparently the steel gas distribution system needs to be bonded, not the stainless flex (AKA CSST, Corrugated Stainless Steel Tubing). Seems an issue because street mains are now PE and not providing a ground.
    Last issue of NEC I have specifically FORBIDS grounding to ANY gas line........

    (B) Not Permitted for Use as Grounding Electrodes.
    The following systems and materials shall not be used as
    grounding electrodes:
    (1) Metal underground gas piping systems

    There IS a requirement IF the gas piping is likely to become energized, that it be "bonded to" a legitimate grounding electrode. That is a slight but important difference from being THE actual PE, and seems to allow bonding the internal piping, with no requirement for pipes outside.

    (B) Other Metal Piping. If installed in, or attached to, a
    building or structure, a metal piping system(s), including
    gas piping, that is likely to become energized shall be
    bonded to any· of the following:
    (1) Equipment grounding conductor for the circuit that is
    likely to energize the piping system
    (2) Serviceequipinent enclosure
    (3) Grounded conductor at the service
    (4) Grounding electrode conductor, if of sufficient size
    (5) One or more grounding electrodes used
    CNC machines only go through the motions

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    • #47
      Originally posted by J Tiers View Post
      Last issue of NEC I have specifically FORBIDS grounding to ANY gas line........
      It would be grounding the gas line, not grounding the elec to the gas line. It presumes your panel is properly grounded.

      reggie_obe I already read that! I'm a bit uncertain how well grounded my panel is, unlike another property that actually has stakes into the slab. But happily, it sounds like the the risk is greatest in gas lines in the attic, and both of mine are well below that.
      Location: Jersey City NJ USA

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      • #48
        Originally posted by gellfex View Post
        It would be grounding the gas line, not grounding the elec to the gas line. It presumes your panel is properly grounded.

        ..........
        OK, there was mention of the street mains. Maybe he meant that the hookup lines for gas are now being done with that orange plastic, which obviously is not a ground, and the change would have un-grounded the facility pipes. That would make sense, and fits what you said. That would be if your lines are like that. Not all are (yet). If they are still steel, they would be grounded, albeit not very well, simply by being in the dirt.

        A "proper ground" can have up to 25 ohms resistance (or whatever two rods give), which is only a little under a 5A current at 120V, not near enough to pop a breaker.

        CNC machines only go through the motions

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