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Finally got a decent hydraulic press

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  • #16
    Our biggest press in the fitting shop when I worked was very similar in design, but 25 tonne capacity. The lifting was achieved by a concentric pneumatic piston. You fully extended the ram and then put a collar on it with chains which slotted into the sides of the table. We had a 3/4" thick flame cut table about 3 x 2 foot fixed on it. It was not designed for punching work.

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    • #17
      My old Wilson 75 Ton is a lot older than these, not as pretty, but plenty of power. Just messing around with it one day, I pushed a 1/2" steel ball thru a 1/2" steel plate. Only took 20 tons of push to do it. Mine was made during WW II , don't remember the date.
      I remember trying to get some parts for it about 15 years ago, the Wilson press company was going thru one of its bankruptcies. Glad to see they are back in business.
      Sarge41

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      • #18
        I am curious what he got it for.. my buddy got a very similar one from a Honda shop closing, but 25 T I think.. 300 bucks I think which is a screaming deal..

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        • #19
          Nice press and 75ton is not "too big" especially if you get into any heavy equipment or farm repair work. We have 50 and 75 ton Dake presses at work and I am drawing up a 150 ton in my spare time. On the one hand 75tons of force is a lot, but on the other, it's amazing how many times it isn't enough.
          I just need one more tool,just one!

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          • #20
            Man, you'll be able to break things even more efficiently now

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            • #21
              That's an excellent press. I have a much older 60 ton unit with the cast iron pump and reservoir on the site. For those the pump packing can be purchased from McMaster Carr. Wonderful presses, I've only pushed mine a bit over 30 ton so far. Be careful, if you do the math your press can easily exceed the yield strength of the stuff you are putting in it.
              Mike
              Central Ohio, USA

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              • #22
                One think nice about the tonnage is if you put a small shopmade brake in it...
                first off , you can probably have at least 2 feet of width...
                second, you can probably bend 3/8 plate over that width.. handy capability to have..

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                • #23
                  Originally posted by wierdscience View Post
                  Nice press and 75ton is not "too big" especially if you get into any heavy equipment or farm repair work. We have 50 and 75 ton Dake presses at work and I am drawing up a 150 ton in my spare time. On the one hand 75tons of force is a lot, but on the other, it's amazing how many times it isn't enough.
                  Up until now I've had to go to a friends shop with any press work. He has a 25 ton OTC with a power pack and double acting ram and I've never not had enough power to do the job. So this 75 ton is clearly more than I normally need but it also opens the door for shop made special press tooling. A small press brake will be the first shop made accessory.

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                  • #24
                    Originally posted by mattthemuppet View Post
                    Man, you'll be able to break things even more efficiently now
                    Did you mean brake ?

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                    • #25
                      no, I mostly just break stuff on my hydraulic press

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                      • #26
                        Oh, a war of words!
                        Let me play.

                        -D
                        DZER

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                        • #27
                          Doozer,

                          What is the hand wheel on the right side in the pictures for? The ram looks fixed from the picture so I can't see it moving the ram left or right, so I can't figure out what that side load assembly is for?
                          maybe you can enlighten us?

                          Curious minds need to know !

                          TX
                          Mr fixit for the family
                          Chris

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                          • #28
                            I bet that thing would have happily squashed tubing for me when I was doing the ends of conduit for a frame. (Still have other jobs for the tool I made). I've been looking for one, even 20 ton, but have not liked the pricing.

                            That frame I have springs a bit at 3500 lb, the ram is supposed to do 4 tons.
                            3751 6193 2700 3517

                            Keep eye on ball.
                            Hashim Khan

                            If you look closely at a digital signal, you find out it is really analog......

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                            • #29
                              KR Wilsons are rack & pinion arbor presses and hydraulic presses,
                              all in one. Guys go gooo gooo over Dake presses, but they ain't shlt.

                              -Doozer
                              DZER

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                              • #30
                                Originally posted by Doozer View Post
                                KR Wilsons are rack & pinion arbor presses and hydraulic presses,
                                all in one. Guys go gooo gooo over Dake presses, but they ain't shlt.

                                -Doozer
                                To expand on this. If you place a part on the table there is no need to pump like crazy trying to take up the gap. Simply flip the lever and use the rack and pinion to bring the ram down against the work. Flip the lever back and start pumping. On the older units if you run out out grunt (can't pump any more) then disengage the large piston (shown by "A" below) from the pump and keep going using only the small piston.

                                Click image for larger version

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                                Mike
                                Central Ohio, USA

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