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  • Cleaning Paint off Machine Badges

    I just picked up a 1929 Doall JD Vertical Bandsaw,it has had about 4 different paint jobs that was done with Blunt Sticks.Badges and all was covered in very thick paint and it needs to be removed.

  • #2
    If the badges are removeable, soak them in a tin of laquer thinners overnight. That will strip of every kind of paint on them. But--if there is anything painted on the badges that you want to keep, don't do it.
    Brian Rupnow
    Design engineer
    Barrie, Ontario, Canada

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    • #3
      I've cleaned a lot of aluminum badges from different machines that I've restored. I've never found that lacquer thinner affected any of the original coloring.

      I'm really surprised because lacquer thinner cuts just about everything. It's my favorite cleaner but you have to be careful.

      I've never soaked them, but I have wiped them several times with thinner soaked rags. I have noticed that it will start to remove some of the coloring around the edges of the badge.

      Maybe you could try soaking them in a less aggressive type solvent like turp or enamel reducer. that may soften it up enough so you can rub it off with your finger.

      A heat gun may be another option.

      JL ......



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      • #4
        I use Jasco paint and epoxy remover. Its a gel so stays put. Cover with food plastic wrap and come back after lunch. Wipe clean. I have done many like that. JR
        My old yahoo group. Bridgeport Mill Group

        https://groups.yahoo.com/neo/groups/...port_mill/info

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        • #5
          I will try wiping with lacquer thinner tonight,badges are removable Thanks Guys will post results.

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          • #6
            Another paint solvent - if you can find a supplier - is methylene chloride. It's the most effective paint stripper that I've ever found.

            Ian
            All of the gear, no idea...

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            • #7
              Originally posted by Ian B View Post
              Another paint solvent - if you can find a supplier - is methylene chloride. It's the most effective paint stripper that I've ever found.

              Ian
              Yes Sir. Methylene chloride is the active ingredient in Jasco. JR

              My old yahoo group. Bridgeport Mill Group

              https://groups.yahoo.com/neo/groups/...port_mill/info

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              • #8
                Lacquer thinner removes lacquer, and most paints are not lacquer. Use paint remover, as suggested. I've restored quite a few machine badges stamped in brass by spraying the bare metal with lacquer and then carefully removing it from the high spots with fine emery paper.

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                • #9
                  My advice runs counter to the above. Using any kind of solvent exposes you to the risk of destroying your nameplate.
                  To remove paint I use the edge of a driver's license and patience. It works!

                  metalmagpie

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                  • #10
                    There are nameplates, and there are nameplates.

                    Some have raised metal for the text (etched nameplates).

                    Some have stamped-in text.

                    Some have the text all in paint only

                    Some have paint for the labels of the entries, but the entries themselves are stamped.

                    Any of the ones that have all or part of the text in paint only are a risk when using ANY sort of chemical paint remover.

                    The safest paint remover I know of, and it may not be 100% safe, is plain water. Simmering a painted item in hot water for a longish time will loosen or remove most types of paint, other than baked-on enamel. Does a good job on latex paints, sorta OK on oil based, and takes (usually) much longer to affect baked-on paint.

                    Not too practical for big parts, but very possible for removable nameplates.
                    3751 6193 2700 3517

                    Keep eye on ball.
                    Hashim Khan

                    If you look closely at a digital signal, you find out it is really analog......

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                    • #11
                      Thanks Guys for some great ideas,removed most with Lacquer Thinner then put in hot water to remove the last bit of stubborn spots.Very happy with results considering
                      over 90 yrs old,those plastic kitchen scrapers are the ticket and can be sharpened numerous times on disc sander. Click image for larger version

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                      • #12
                        Those came out great. Hey! New business opportunity JR
                        My old yahoo group. Bridgeport Mill Group

                        https://groups.yahoo.com/neo/groups/...port_mill/info

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                        • #13
                          good job!

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                          • #14
                            Just as a further anecdote... The oil sump cap on my W&S lathe...



                            One quick brush with hardware-store non-methyl-chloride paint stripper:



                            And after about ten minutes, scrubbed with an old toothbrush in warm water:



                            This isn't the only plaque I've done exactly that, to. In most cases, the printing is an ink or lacquer, which isn't affected as fast as the (usually) enamel top coat. The enamel bubbles up, scrub it off in water to neutralize the stripper, and virtually no damage to the printing. (Apart, of course, from whatever was already there before it was painted. )

                            Doc.
                            Doc's Machine. (Probably not what you expect.)

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                            • #15
                              Originally posted by J Tiers View Post
                              There are nameplates, and there are nameplates.

                              Some have raised metal for the text (etched nameplates).

                              Some have stamped-in text.

                              Some have the text all in paint only

                              Some have paint for the labels of the entries, but the entries themselves are stamped.

                              Any of the ones that have all or part of the text in paint only are a risk when using ANY sort of chemical paint remover.

                              The safest paint remover I know of, and it may not be 100% safe, is plain water. Simmering a painted item in hot water for a longish time will loosen or remove most types of paint, other than baked-on enamel. Does a good job on latex paints, sorta OK on oil based, and takes (usually) much longer to affect baked-on paint.

                              Not too practical for big parts, but very possible for removable nameplates.
                              This Job Selector that’s located on inside of door is smaller in dia. than the typical ones you see on most Doalls.Even being inside someone was able to slop paint on outer portion where material is written,I used Tiers method and was real happy with results.Was a little disappointed they don’t have Armour Plate listed as my 1950 ML does lol! Click image for larger version

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