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Making 5/8” id 1” od Arbor Bushings. Brass? Steel?

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  • Making 5/8” id 1” od Arbor Bushings. Brass? Steel?

    I need some arbor bushings to be able to use table saw blades with 1” holes on a 5/8” arbor saw. (My saw uses the not so common 9” blades which are available in both arbor sizes.)

    I have brass, steel, and a lathe. Will brass hold up in this kind of service? I realize that the blade is clamped between mounting washers and the arbor adapter is mostly centering the blade.

    Just checking as I have a lot of respect for rotating saw blades.

    Yes, I see they are available on ebay for as little as $4.95 US delivered. Not as much fun as making a few though.

  • #2
    As you say they are only for locating the blade. Either will work just fine.

    What I'd suggest though is check for the relief you have between the washers and make the spacer a little thicker than the blade disc but so it still has a slight play between the washers. Not only will this give you a better positioning and centering on the thread crests but it'll also make it easier to slide the bushing into place rather than cocking and jamming a lot as you place it.

    The other thought would be to make the bushings with a snug snap/push fit and with a thin flange around the one side and press fit them into the blades with the 1" holes. Or is this what you were considering? In this case the flange that sets the depth the bushings seat to would be thin enough that it's less than the center relief of the cup washer. I might also suggest that if this is the way you're intending to go that the bushings be bonded with one of the fancy "metal glues" such as Loctite 680. It would be good to get a snug fit but it should not be a "vise tightened" press fit as the pressure at the center hole might affect the dishing of the blade and cause a slight warping. So a light press with bonding agent sounds like a safer option to me.

    So 9" saw? An old Rockwell Delta? I had one of those and used it for quite a few years before gifting it to my brother and buying a 10" Delta cabinet maker's saw. Mostly to get the better fence. Cut dimensions and power wise the 9 was fine. But that fence....
    Chilliwack BC, Canada

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    • #3
      Originally posted by BCRider View Post
      So 9" saw? An old Rockwell Delta? I had one of those and used it for quite a few years before gifting it to my brother and buying a 10" Delta cabinet maker's saw. Mostly to get the better fence. Cut dimensions and power wise the 9 was fine. But that fence....
      Yup, Rockwell Delta built like a tank. I inherited it a few years back, thought it was an 8" at the time. Had a good blade when I got it but have used it a bit more this past stay at home year. As you say, pretty good saw except for the fence. Motor can take 120 or 240.

      Thin flange and Loctite. Good idea, I hadn't thought of either. My intent was to have 1 adapter per blade that stays in the blade.

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      • #4
        I've made them in the past from PVC, so basically anything works fine. They just hold the blade centered until the saw washers bite and hold.
        I just need one more tool,just one!

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        • #5
          Here's a sketch for what I'm thinking for the cross section. The relief cut with the threading tool ensures there's no corner radius to hold the flange's face off the blade. And the chamfer on the small end give you a start to seating the blade. And the narrower crest once down to around .001 oversize can be lightly skimmed with a smooth file until the blade is a nice hand pressure push fit. Or something close to that. And the inside corner relief when the bushing is adhered into place will form a glue ridge that aids with keeping the bushing in place....

          Mind you the times I've used Loctite 680 I find that it's easily as strong as soldering. I used it on the draw tube for my 5C collet chuck on the lathe. And I'm not shy about torqueing on that. So HIGHLY unlikely that if you use one of the 68x range of adhesives that the bushing is going to fall out any time soon.

          Hope this helps keep your saw running nicely for years to come. Like you said it's built like a tank. And I look forward to reading about you making a better rip fence and front guide rod system for it.

          Click image for larger version

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          Chilliwack BC, Canada

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          • #6
            Originally posted by wierdscience View Post
            I've made them in the past from PVC, so basically anything works fine. They just hold the blade centered until the saw washers bite and hold.
            I think my old 1948 Shop Smith (buried in my mom's garage out West since the 90's) used a piece of copper tubing as a centering arbor. Really have to get rid that contraption next time I am able to visit.

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            • #7
              Originally posted by BCRider View Post

              Hope this helps keep your saw running nicely for years to come. Like you said it's built like a tank. And I look forward to reading about you making a better rip fence and front guide rod system for it.
              Than you for the drawing. With several options now I can find a blade regardless of its arbor size. How'd you guess I have been eyeing the fence for improvements? Wouldn't that post belong in Home Shop Woodworker, or Home Shop I fix old things that no one would pay to save forums?

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              • #8
                Well... I assume that you'd be making the new fence system from metal.... Yeah?

                It was the prospect of the new fence what with planning and all to finally just stop considering the whole thing and buy the new saw. I was going to base it on Unistrut and I even had the length of strut and parts. The existing rail uses round rod into rounded saddles. So I was going to turn up some suitable size rounds and cut then mill them and fit them to the Unistrut channel so the channel was going to handle the load from the wings. And a piece of 3" heavy section angle iron was going to be set up to use for the slider. Ball bearings or perhaps Delrin slider blocks to take the weight and ride on the inner flange faces of the strut for smooth movement. DIdn't know which way to go but was thinking of the ball bearings with crested "tires" so they tended to push aside the wood dust. And if that didn't work out then I would have switched to the delrin slide blocks.

                Yep, I had it pretty well all sussed out. But the 10" was on sale and came with a nice fence and blades were getting harder to find.... and the rest, as they say, is history.
                Chilliwack BC, Canada

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by DS_park View Post

                  Than you for the drawing. With several options now I can find a blade regardless of its arbor size. How'd you guess I have been eyeing the fence for improvements? Wouldn't that post belong in Home Shop Woodworker, or Home Shop I fix old things that no one would pay to save forums?
                  Ah, Shopsmith, like all multi-machines, they do a lot of things, but don't do any one thing very well.
                  I just need one more tool,just one!

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                  • #10
                    Id go with steel over brass. Table saw blade is hardly a permanent installation, and installing and removing the blade on the arbor will loosen up the ID. Dunno how bad yours is, but the threads on my table saw arbor could probably work as a passable round file

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                    • #11
                      Blades often come with an arbour bushing included. They're usually made of steel, so that would seem like a good choice.

                      Ian
                      All of the gear, no idea...

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                      • #12
                        you might want to make the bushing undersize and indicate the saw. its for metal, right?

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                        • #13
                          Originally posted by dian View Post
                          you might want to make the bushing undersize and indicate the saw. its for metal, right?
                          The saw is for wood. Just found McMaster Carr sells steel adapters for about $2.70 apiece. I passed on a good new blade that was for 1" prior to exploring options. Now I'll just keep my eyes out for a few decent 9" blades and deal with the arbor size if it comes up.

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