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Got My Outside Chamfer Tool Today

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  • #31
    Originally posted by JoeLee View Post
    And I have to say that I'm not impressed at all by the workmanship or the finish it leaves....

    Click image for larger version Name:	IMG-20201106-171123.jpg Views:	0 Size:	117.2 KB ID:	1908991
    What a POS that tool is!
    12" x 35" Logan 2557V lathe
    Index "Super 55" mill
    18" Vectrax vertical bandsaw
    7" x 10" Vectrax mitering bandsaw
    24" State disc sander

    Comment


    • #32
      Even if the finish was perfect, it is clear that a tool like that is never intended for use on a drill press, let alone a mill.

      Comment


      • #33
        I don't think a tool like this is easy to cut nicely with.

        In a regular internal countersink, all the forces tend to center the tool in the cut; in this kind, any slight imbalance will want to throw it off-center, and mess things up. That will lead to chatter, especially if the teeth are all evenly spaced.

        Comment


        • #34
          Being a little bit like a few thou off center isn't going to cause the horrible finish I get with this. The finish is all in how the cutting edges are cut. In this case rough cut and burred, that's not going to leave a good finish.



          JL.....

          Comment


          • #35
            When you get chatter like the big piece , try turning machine off and as it coasts down, try cleaning bad part off, oil helps.
            while cutting if it starts try peck feeding..like in harder momentarily then quick back off.. before harmonics can set off the vibrating.
            my hunch is the good multi flute cuicutters ke Severance, have one or more flutes space at at different division, for better cutting. . I e a 6 flute won't all be 6 degrees apart.

            Comment


            • #36
              Actually I'm thinking a single flute might be the solution.
              12" x 35" Logan 2557V lathe
              Index "Super 55" mill
              18" Vectrax vertical bandsaw
              7" x 10" Vectrax mitering bandsaw
              24" State disc sander

              Comment


              • #37
                Originally posted by 754 View Post
                When you get chatter like the big piece , try turning machine off and as it coasts down, try cleaning bad part off, oil helps.
                while cutting if it starts try peck feeding..like in harder momentarily then quick back off.. before harmonics can set off the vibrating.
                my hunch is the good multi flute cuicutters ke Severance, have one or more flutes space at at different division, for better cutting. . I e a 6 flute won't all be 6 degrees apart.
                I tried peck feeding, different R's, even turning the spindle by hand. That reduced the chatter on the 1/2" dia. piece a little but won't do anything for the ratty finish. It's just a poorly made / sharpened cutter.

                JL.....................

                Comment


                • #38
                  Originally posted by ezduzit View Post
                  Actually I'm thinking a single flute might be the solution.
                  I can do a whole lot better with a carbide tool bit set at 45 deg.

                  JL...............

                  Comment


                  • #39
                    That tool is simply a POS. The basic design may be OK, but it was very poorly made and that shows in the work done with it. McMaster, among others, has tools of this design and they are probably a lot better quality.

                    Some time back I needed to make several dozen aluminum pegs for a couple of racks to hang things in our laundry room. I choose 1/4" aluminum for the material and wanted the ends to look professional. That meant that I needed to face the ends and then put a nice chamfer on them. I purchased and used this tool for the chamfers and it worked perfectly.

                    Click image for larger version  Name:	P13n16Red_zpse8eea002.JPG Views:	1 Size:	26.6 KB ID:	1909374

                    It works on diameters from under 1/4" up to well over 1" and does both inside and outside chamfers. It did a great job and I have used it many times since. I highly recommend it. You can get one at various web sources. (I am not necessarily recommending any of these sources. They can be found many places.)

                    https://smile.amazon.com/TIPU-Inner-...xpY2s9dHJ1ZQ==

                    https://www.walmart.com/ip/Portable-...cc39e99892cb69

                    I also needed to face those 1/4" aluminum pins before cutting the chamfer on them. It would have taken a lot of time to chuck each one individually in the lathe or in a mill vise so I opted to make a one size, facing tool with a end cutting milling cutter and a scrap of steel.

                    Click image for larger version  Name:	P21Red_zps977ab887.JPG Views:	1 Size:	29.3 KB ID:	1909375
                    I simply chucked it in a hand held drill and stuck the saw cut, aluminum blanks in the end. A few seconds and the end was perfectly flat. Notice the generous sized, cross drilled hole to allow chips to just fall out. It was well worth the small amount of time needed to construct it.

                    A similar tool could be made for one size, outside edge chamfering with a carbide insert. The trick with it is the single size design; that prevents any chattering.

                    With these two tools I was able to finish both ends of over three dozen pins in just a few minutes.

                    Last edited by Paul Alciatore; 11-08-2020, 07:18 PM.
                    Paul A.
                    SE Texas

                    And if you look REAL close at an analog signal,
                    You will find that it has discrete steps.

                    Comment


                    • #40
                      Originally posted by Paul Alciatore View Post
                      That tool is simply a POS. The basic design may be OK, but it was very poorly made and that shows in the work done with it. McMaster, among others, has tools of this design and they are probably a lot better quality.

                      Some time back I needed to make several dozen aluminum pegs for a couple of racks to hang things in our laundry room. I choose 1/4" aluminum for the material and wanted the ends to look professional. That meant that I needed to face the ends and then put a nice chamfer on them. I purchased and used this tool for the chamfers and it worked perfectly.

                      Click image for larger version Name:	P13n16Red_zpse8eea002.JPG Views:	1 Size:	26.6 KB ID:	1909374

                      It works on diameters from under 1/4" up to well over 1" and does both inside and outside chamfers. It did a great job and I have used it many times since. I highly recommend it. You can get one at various web sources. (I am not necessarily recommending any of these sources. They can be found many places.)

                      https://smile.amazon.com/TIPU-Inner-...xpY2s9dHJ1ZQ==

                      https://www.walmart.com/ip/Portable-...cc39e99892cb69

                      I also needed to face those 1/4" aluminum pins before cutting the chamfer on them. It would have taken a lot of time to chuck each one individually in the lathe or in a mill vise so I opted to make a one size, facing tool with a end cutting milling cutter and a scrap of steel.

                      Click image for larger version Name:	P21Red_zps977ab887.JPG Views:	1 Size:	29.3 KB ID:	1909375
                      I simply chucked it in a hand held drill and stuck the saw cut, aluminum blanks in the end. A few seconds and the end was perfectly flat. Notice the generous sized, cross drilled hole to allow chips to just fall out. It was well worth the small amount of time needed to construct it.

                      A similar tool could be made for one size, outside edge chamfering with a carbide insert. The trick with it is the single size design; that prevents any chattering.

                      With these two tools I was able to finish both ends of over three dozen pins in just a few minutes.
                      Yes, it is a POS... plain and simple and it's going back. HTC never called me back Friday and I doubt they will tomorrow.

                      I have one of those big plastic housed ID / OD chamfer tools like the blue one you show, only mine is red and carries the Rigid brand name and covers the same size tubing. It's OK for copper tube, breaks the inside edge left from a tubing cutter and cleans up any burrs on the OD, doesn't leave a pretty finish but who cares...... the end will be inside a female fitting and soldered.

                      The endmill thing is pretty clever. Nice job.

                      JL.............

                      Comment


                      • #41
                        I like the looks of this design (pipe reamer):
                        https://www.amazon.com/RIDGID-29983-...891729&sr=8-94
                        Location: North Central Texas

                        Comment


                        • #42
                          Originally posted by Joel View Post
                          I like the looks of this design (pipe reamer):
                          https://www.amazon.com/RIDGID-29983-...891729&sr=8-94
                          Looks good for a hand operated tool.
                          12" x 35" Logan 2557V lathe
                          Index "Super 55" mill
                          18" Vectrax vertical bandsaw
                          7" x 10" Vectrax mitering bandsaw
                          24" State disc sander

                          Comment

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