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OT. Cleanup of drywall dust with the shop VAC plugging up fast, Help?

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  • OT. Cleanup of drywall dust with the shop VAC plugging up fast, Help?

    Hi Group,

    I have a drywall project that I'm working on and have been using my RIDGID 9gal shop VAC to clean up. The darn filter keeps blocking up so fast that I'm spending a lot of time just cleaning it out to use it. I have tried doubling the filter bag but no change.

    And No, I don't think I have piled on the mud causing lots to sand ! I was told to try wet sanding with a sponge which I have changed to which was been a good idea, but the sanding still needs to be done in some areas and the floor still needs to be vacuumed.

    I look forward to any suggestions to help with cleanup.

    TX
    Mr fixit for the family
    Chris

  • #2
    Add a cyclone separator: https://www.amazon.com/Oneida-Molded.../dp/B002JP315K

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    • #3
      You could try one of those vortex pre-extractor cans https://www.amazon.com/Oneida-Air-Sy.../dp/B002GZLCHM. I've been considering it, but I've gotten much better at knifework and need very little sanding.
      Location: Jersey City NJ USA

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      • #4
        Get a Vacuum designed for drywall dust most Vacuums are not.
        Beaver County Alberta Canada

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        • #5
          If it's a wet/dry vac, try putting some water in it. Might help a bit. Or put a wet rag in the bottom of the can- might give more surface area to catch dust before it hits the filter.
          I seldom do anything within the scope of logical reason and calculated cost/benefit, etc- I'm following my passion-

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          • #6
            When I remodeled my house I was constantly tapping my shop vac
            filter out outside against a tree to get out the plaster dust..

            --Doozer
            DZER

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            • #7
              Dust Deputy. I've sucked up a ton of body filler dust with one inline on my shop vac, never clogged a filter yet.

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              • #8
                Everybodys jumping to the expensive options, yall missed the cheap one; shopvac filter bags are a thing. Stick one of those in there, it contains the dust and keeps is from hitting the actual filter

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                • #9
                  Use Floor sweeping compound, or Dampen some saw dust ( not soak !) with water and sweep it around
                  and then vacuum it up
                  Rich
                  Green Bay, WI

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                  • #10
                    I have two real vacs rated for sheet rock dust. BUT.... the best solution is... take out the damn filters, run a hose from the output (assuming your vac can do this) and pump the crap outside. If you are worried about the dust outside, turn a lawn sprinkler on. I've done this many times... even just poked the output hose out of a window.

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                    • #11
                      Sweep the heavy stuff first, then vacuum the rest.

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                      • #12
                        Originally posted by epicfail48 View Post
                        Everybodys jumping to the expensive options, yall missed the cheap one; shopvac filter bags are a thing. Stick one of those in there, it contains the dust and keeps is from hitting the actual filter
                        I use them but dust still ends up in the filter.
                        Location: Jersey City NJ USA

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                        • #13
                          I have always done as epicfail suggests, without major issue (and I have done it a lot). If you are having problems with the standard bags, use the specialty yellow drywall bags. I give the bags sort of a shake on occasion to keep the airflow up. I also put duct tape in the area where the inlet shoots the debris into the bag. I have had a few develop a hole there before I started doing this - no problems since. I do use the HD pleated filters in addition to the bag.

                          https://www.lowes.com/pd/Shop-Vac-2-...n-Bag/10063230
                          Location: North Central Texas

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                          • #14
                            Somewhat related as it deals with shop vacs...from https://discuss.inventables.com/t/sh...rings/27855/19


                            Sorry in advance for the necro post but i’ve also had issues with bearing failure and i discovered the problem. Almost all of these “cheap” consumer grade shop vacs (shop-vac, ridgid, stanley, etc etc) are largely made by the same company named Emerson. As a cost cutting measure for a world that has become stuck on cheaply made, disposable products… Emerson has designed a motor with only one sealed ball bearing, and on the other end of the motor shaft is a bronze “Oilite” ( https://oilite.com/ 8 ) type bushing surrounded by felt that holds the lubricating oil. While i have nothing against such a bearing in general (they work just fine in my 100 year old GE table fan), the use of them in this motor design where they are not serviceable is clearly a way to make these vacuums have built in obsolescence. Or to put it bluntly, they self destruct once the oil is used up, overheating the bearing and motor causing a thermal fuse to break, disabling the vacuum. Typically such oil bearings are accessible in properly designed devices and can last many decades with very little maintenance but not in this case.
                            A while back I did take apart my 14 gallon Rigid shop vac when I heard a change in the sound of the motor and i’m kicking myself for not taking photos, but as I thought, the felt that once held a supply of il was dry. I gave it a good dose of 3-in-1 Oil for electric motors (comes in a blue can), put everything back together, and it ran like new again. Keep in mind, i did this well in advance of a bearing failure and was able to prevent the issue. The longer you run the motor, where it begins to squeel loudly, a re-oiling may not be enough because the friction smears the surface of the oilite bearing causing oil to no longer flow through its highly porous structure.
                            After a bit of searching, it seems a guy on youtube who was also having the same problem came up with a MUCH better solution than re-oiling, and that is to replace the bushing with a 608-2RS ball bearing which just happens to fit perfectly into the housing.
                            Check it out! https://youtu.be/KdTgQGFfy9o 66
                            I will be doing this to my Ridgid 1450 vac in the very near future.
                            Location: Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, Canada

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                            • #15
                              Originally posted by paul463 View Post
                              Dust Deputy. I've sucked up a ton of body filler dust with one inline on my shop vac, never clogged a filter yet.
                              Body filler dust is lighter and maybe not as fine as sheet rock dust. It doesn't pack like sheet rock dust does. Density is different too.

                              I've used my shop vac for body filler dust for years and it never clogged, same with fine saw dust, never a problem.

                              JL...............

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