Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

New bronze bearings for South Bend Lathe Head Stock

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • New bronze bearings for South Bend Lathe Head Stock

    I have owned a Model O 1930 Heavy 9 South Bend Lathe for about 9 years. I love it and has performed many great and accurate projects. I have noticed that the bronze bearings and spindle have considerable wear and I would like to find someone that can replace and bore new bronze bearings and hopefully clean up and polish the spindle as well. I don't know if this even economically viable, but I am willing to entertain significant cost to keep this great Vintage lathe in good condition.
    I would like to know if there is anyone out there that does this kind of work. Any help with this is greatly appreciated.
    Thanks

    Skipd1

  • #2
    How much wear? Have you run out of adjustment on the bearing caps?


    This is not exactly the same situation, but with some ingenuity and a little bit of crazy, it's possible to line bore your own headstock:
    https://www.practicalmachinist.com/v...dstock-146690/
    Location: Northern WI

    Comment


    • #3
      I'm currently tearing down one of those myself

      What are the symptoms of the wear? Excessive lift or runout on the spindle? If the spindle is badly worn then one option would be to make your own bronze bearings from solid or pipe to the original spindle dimensions, then send the spindle out for hard chroming and grinding back to those specs. No idea about the hard chroming/ grinding part but bronze isn't cheap!

      One curious thing I found when I took the spindle out was a thin brass shim wrapped around the front bronze bearing. Might be there to take up some play in the spindle, might be there to compensate for a glob of paint under the bearing cap, won't know until I get the lathe back together and do some tests.

      Comment


      • #4
        I think the factory bearings can be adjusted, if there is still some good gap by the slit.

        Comment


        • #5
          You would only need a thin bronze tube so not too expensive. One of my lathes (not SB) has larger than standard spindle and slightly odd the orignal bronze bearings overbored and fitted with thin sleeves. Could be the sleeves are the second time it was reworked.

          Comment


          • #6
            Bronze and chrome are not a recommended mix for bearings.

            Comment


            • #7
              really? why not?

              Comment


              • #8
                I don't know why, but motorcycle telescopic forks usually had bronze bushes on plain steel tubes, and when chrome tubes became the norm they had to change the bush material, often to a PTFE coating. I remember the explanation in one of the motorcycle magazines, but not the details.

                Comment


                • #9
                  Forks are not a rotational assembly... far as I know , Teflon coated bushes were added for less stiction.. ..maybe they wore less ? But it's a type of application with concentrated load on only a portion of the bearing....... sorta a bit like the way a IC piston wears..

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Certain combinations of metals make better bearing partners than others. You would never put chrome faced piston rings in a chrome bore. They are fine in a cast iron cylinder, and plain cast iron rings for chrome bores. It has no relevance which direction the bearing moves in.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      That is a far different deal . RULE OF thumb for me has always been , don't run similar metals together. . Although cast rings do run in cast sleeves, i suspect major difference in alloys. Cast iron though is self lubricating to some extent..

                      Comment

                      Working...
                      X