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Please oil your machines!

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  • Please oil your machines!

    Please just keep your machines oiled!

    This is a short video of the difference oil makes... Two identical lathes, close to the same serial number, that have vastly different wear.

    I'll wage the compounds of most lathes are the least used part of the machine.. For this much wear it's a crime in my eyes!


  • #2
    At work we had machines with auto lube, and some that did not.
    Guess which ones are still working like new.
    Beaver County Alberta Canada

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    • #3
      You can only make this comparison if the two lathes had nearly identical lives. If one was on the production floor and the other was in the tool room, the wear will always be different. But, "yes", it is a good idea to properly maintain your lathes.

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      • #4
        Keeps down the rust too

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        • #5
          I don't know, I'm curious to see how well my 10ee works with no oil.

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          • #6
            You know, that oil film has a thickness, and it is "squishy", it squeezes out under pressure, so it leads to inaccuracy when the oil gets squeezed and the parts change position.

            For best accuracy, you need to clean off all the oil and run the ways of your lathe bone dry so that squishy oil does not foul things up..
            Last edited by J Tiers; 11-16-2020, 11:04 AM.
            CNC machines only go through the motions

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            • #7
              Also, change your way wipers. So quick. So easy. So cheap. Yet seemingly never done.
              21" Royersford Excelsior CamelBack Drillpress Restoration
              1943 Sidney 16x54 Lathe Restoration

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              • #8
                I gotta manufacture my own way wipers since I can't buy them for my lathe. I fitted oilers on my lathe in several places though to better oil it.

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                • #9
                  When we took the apron and saddle of the Smart & Brown model A to bits to renew the worn shafts and bushes, we also made sure the built in oil pump was restored. Now the pump supplies oil to the crossslide, saddle, all the gears and bearings and the new leadscrew nut. Just moving the saddle works the pump via the rack.

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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by DennisCA View Post
                    I gotta manufacture my own way wipers since I can't buy them for my lathe. .
                    Is it that difficult? I guess it's like a cook buying pre-cut chips (french fries).

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                    • #11
                      I made some wipers for the S&B out of thin closed cell foam rubber. I have no idea whether they have worked, I keep promising to change them one day.

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                      • #12
                        When the Lubrication Police arrive at my shop and accuse me of criminal lubrication neglect I always point out the oil puddles on the floor, generally they leave without taking me into custody.

                        Your criminal justice system may be considerably different of course.

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                        • #13
                          Originally posted by Bented View Post
                          When the Lubrication Police arrive at my shop and accuse me of criminal lubrication neglect I always point out the oil puddles on the floor, generally they leave without taking me into custody.

                          Your criminal justice system may be considerably different of course.
                          At 1:50 in this video you can see the rivers of oil I run I also had to make new wipers for the planer and you can see their covers at that time also... Used felt from McMasters... Worked very well... Cheap also so you can change them out often...

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                          • #14
                            Congratulations!!! Lovely machine and in good hands. I thought that parallel trick was mine! I've taken to using springs between them to keep that from happening. They might get loose but they won't jump out. Beautiful!! Thanks!

                            Pete
                            1973 SB 10K .
                            BenchMaster mill.

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                            • #15
                              Originally posted by Baz View Post
                              Is it that difficult? I guess it's like a cook buying pre-cut chips (french fries).
                              It's kinda annoying. I made one pair from leather, then rubber. I use a knife to cut them to shape. Originals were felt.

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