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English/Euro translation to American

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  • TECHSHOP
    replied
    I find it somewhat interesting that the machining forums seem to be more evenly "international" than many other forums. I don't mind it when people post with their "native" spellings or call things by the "national" vocabulary. It helps me to keep track of who is who, and where they are from. I find that when I read print from the UK, that the "layout" is different enough to cause me some confusion for the first page or so (as in where to look for the next paragraph around pictures). I have a few Canadian and Australian books and magazines, that also have a layout differences from the USA "norm".

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  • PTSideshow
    replied
    We had a post for a member in England a number of months ago about belts for his linisher. my problem was the U.S. Publisher not only didn't provide it in the glossary but it was also spelled wrong in the body of the text. I was writing up a report on the book for a list that I belong to so I wanted to make sure that I was not following a wrong thread of memory. When I was active on the letterhead bbs we had all kind of fun with the different terms for Norway, Down Under, New Zealand and The Emerald Isle.

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  • lynnl
    replied
    Evan wrote: "...I expect the term is an amalgam of line (or linear) finisher as that is what it does. "

    That's probably right. No such word in my Random House Dictionary. But then it's the worst dictionary I've ever used. I think the name comes from the fact that they just selected words at 'random' to include in it.

    I've seen the word used before, where the meaning was apparent from the context, but never bothered to try to look it up before.

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  • Evan
    replied
    I have both a bench mount belt sander and a small linisher. The bench mount belt sander has a 4" wide belt as well as an 8" disc on the side. The belt is horizontal. The linisher also takes an abrasive belt but as is usual for a linisher it is much narrower, vertical and has a table. It uses a 1" wide belt and is perfect for fine finishing on small metal pieces as it puts on a nice finish, almost polished. I expect the term is an amalgam of line (or linear) finisher as that is what it does. We also use quite a few British terms here in Canada, not really a suprise.

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  • Guest's Avatar
    Guest replied
    A 6 inch or Milimeter left handed crescent wrench?

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  • miker
    replied
    Different Terminology

    Originally posted by lynnl
    If he's talking about a belt sander the author should go ahead and call the damn thing a belt sander.
    In Australia we usually call this a Belt Sander http://www.makita.com.au/catalogue/d...hp?tmodel=9910
    and any thing similar to what Evan showed is a Linisher. Sometimes a linisher is called a few other things in my workshop as it proceeds to remove thous off the ends of my fingers.
    Nice thing about the Global membership of this forum is that we are all exposed to different terminology and can ask if in doubt.

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  • PTSideshow
    replied
    Originally posted by lynnl
    If he's talking about a belt sander the author should go ahead and call the damn thing a belt sander.
    that is the problem with publishing in todays world. The person published her book on working with plastics in England. It was written for them. The publisher sold her secondary rights to a U S publisher they have an editor that probbaly has no understanding of the material they are editing. And it slipped by them since in the book it was miss spelled. It just compounds the problem.
    I could use a # 6 left handed spanner D).

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  • Evan
    replied
    http://www.lawm.freeserve.co.uk/linisher_centre.htm

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  • lynnl
    replied
    If he's talking about a belt sander the author should go ahead and call the damn thing a belt sander.

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  • PTSideshow
    replied
    Thanks thought thats what it might be. But it makes it hard when they don't even speller it right. I remember that the sanding belts where called the way you spelled it in a post here a couple of months ago.

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  • thistle
    replied
    you mean a Linisher- which in English is a belt sander.

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  • PTSideshow
    started a topic English/Euro translation to American

    English/Euro translation to American

    In reading a book on working plastics/resins the author wrote "A faster method of removing material would be to use a linicher. " What is a linicher? They have a glossary with the book but don't explain this.
    Seems like the publication of hobbists books on both sides of the pond at the same time leaves some editing mistakes or omissions.
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