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  • Moving my lathe

    A week ago, my lathe quit. This was very upsetting, because it had just quit about 2 or 3 months ago, and had to be taken to Toronto for repairs. Fortunately, the safety switch inside the change gear cover had slipped out of adjustment, so my cost was negligible, but the hardest part was getting the lathe out of my tiny workshop and out into the garage and into my truck. I must declare right here, that I really like this lathe. I bought it new about 6 years ago, and it has performed faithfully for me. When it was brand new, I brought it home in my truck, unloaded it with my engine hoist, and hired a local machinery mover to move it into my machine shop. Two great big men stopped by, put a machine skate under the heavy end, and moved it into my machine shop. This took about 15 minutes, and they charged me $500. Never again, said I!!! That was out and out robbery. Three months ago, I moved the lathe out to my truck by myself and drove it to Toronto for repairs. When it was repaired, I unloaded it from my truck and moved it back into my machine shop by myself. That went well, but I was 74 years old in July, and it was just about more than I could handle. Last week I moved the lathe out to my truck by myself again for a trip to Toronto, but thought "there has to be an easier way to do this". I had designed and built a "transfer table" three months ago which I could load the lathe on and transport it from my truck to my machine shop. The really ugly part was moving the lathe from the wheeled "transfer table" back onto the cabinets which the lathe normally sets on.--But wait!!!! I'm a machine designer. Damn, I'll build a machine to assist me!!! (The lathe issue was a wire coming loose on the reverse terminal inside the lathes electrical cabinet.) This first picture shows me in the process of unloading the lathe from my truck, using my cherry picker hoist to place the lathe on the "transfer table".

    Brian Rupnow
    Design engineer
    Barrie, Ontario, Canada

  • #2
    From my garage, one has to pass thru my office to get to my machine shop. (My "machine shop" used to be an annex of my office, with a huge old drafting table in it). The "wheeled transfer table" is quite easy to steer, with fixed pneumatic wheels and tires under one end , and swivel casters under the other end. This picture shows the lathe and transfer table in my office, having just passed thru one doorway between my office and garage.
    Brian Rupnow
    Design engineer
    Barrie, Ontario, Canada

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    • #3
      By the looks of things
      I would say you should
      have gotten a rigger.

      -D
      DZER

      Comment


      • #4
        And here we are with the lathe in my machine shop, almost in it's home position on top of the cabinets on the right hand side. You will see that I have built an overhead gantry, with a wheeled carrier riding on top of the dual 2 x 4'rs passing over top of the lathe, supported on both ends by vertical 2 x 6" timbers. A threaded 1/2" diameter rod reaches from the overhead wheeled carrier down thru a 1/2" clearance hole in a 1 1/4" diameter piece of cold rolled steel held in the chuck. By tightening the nut above the wheeled carrier, I can lift the heavy end of the lathe off the transfer table and see daylight under it. It doesn't require a tremendous feat of strength to manually lift the light end of the lathe and swing it over into it's home position atop the metal cabinets. Then, in theory, I can push the wheeled carrier across to position the heavy end of the lathe above the cabinets, and unscrew the nuts on the 1/2" threaded rod to lower the heavy end into place.
        Brian Rupnow
        Design engineer
        Barrie, Ontario, Canada

        Comment


        • #5
          Now, as I said in my previous post, "In theory I can push the wheeled carriage with the heavy end of the lathe suspended from it into place". In reality, it didn't happen quite that way. The heavy end of the lathe was so heavy that the 3" o.d. diameter bearings on my overhead "wheeled carriage" actually sunk into depressions that it made in the 2 x 4 lumber, and consequently couldn't be pushed by hand. POOP!!!.--However, I have a couple of old scissor jacks that could probably lift the Empire State Building if I wanted to, so I laid one on its side and pushed the carriage into position.
          Last edited by brian Rupnow; 11-21-2020, 02:05 PM.
          Brian Rupnow
          Design engineer
          Barrie, Ontario, Canada

          Comment


          • #6
            With the lathe correctly positioned, it was a simple matter to lower the lathe into it's home position and bolt it into it's final position on top of the cabinets. The lumber and the wheeled carriage are bundled together and put into storage in case I ever need to do this again. (God forbid.)
            Brian Rupnow
            Design engineer
            Barrie, Ontario, Canada

            Comment


            • #7
              Doesn't the repair shop do on-site services ??

              That would have probably been worth $500 after seeing what you had to go through to move this thing.

              That would have been a lot easier than loading and unloading.

              JL.....

              Comment


              • #8
                Joe Lee--No, they do not do in house repairs. They never have.
                Brian Rupnow
                Design engineer
                Barrie, Ontario, Canada

                Comment


                • #9
                  If I still lived in Buffalo,
                  I would volunteer to come up and help you out with your lathe.
                  I don't think you would be too far from Buffalo.

                  -Doozer
                  DZER

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Were it me, I would put a couple pieces of 2 x 2 x1/8" steel angle on those 2 x 4 beams..... end of issue with wheels.

                    1 1'2 x 1 1/2 x 1/8 would be just fine also, and fit better on the 2 x 4.

                    Flat bar might work fine also.
                    Last edited by J Tiers; 11-21-2020, 02:29 PM.
                    1601 2137 5683 1002 1437

                    Keep eye on ball.
                    Hashim Khan

                    If you look closely at a digital signal, you find out it is really analog......

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Doozer--that's a kind offer. I have a friend in Barrie who offered to help me, but mostly I like to work alone. If I work alone, I can take my time and figure out step by step what I want to do. Jerry, you are right. If I have to ever do this again I will probably bolt some 1 1/2" x 1 1/2" x 1/8" angle to the top of the 2 x 4 r's.---Brian
                      Brian Rupnow
                      Design engineer
                      Barrie, Ontario, Canada

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Last time this occurred I was hounded for suggesting Brain learn some minor electrical repairs to be able to avoid a tremendous amount of extra work, downtime, and peril to himself and the lathe. Now that it's happened again, quite soon after the previous, am I still so crazy? Especially since it seems to be minor stuff, and last time, only a mechanical failure of an electrical component.

                        With these modern lathes with lots of safety features and clearly sub-par design/installation quality, this sort of thing sounds like it will continue to occur, and it will only get harder to keep hauling this lathe around.
                        21" Royersford Excelsior CamelBack Drillpress Restoration
                        1943 Sidney 16x54 Lathe Restoration

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          It all looked very well sorted out. And the angle iron wrapping the inside corners would more than take care of the bearings digging into the wood. It would be like you had your own small and short railway!

                          I'm guessing that the temporary gantry setup screws onto the bench on the one side and clamps somehow to the lathe's stand on the other? I don't see anything to stop it tipping to either side otherwise.
                          Chilliwack BC, Canada

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Originally posted by The Metal Butcher View Post
                            Last time this occurred I was hounded for suggesting Brain learn some minor electrical repairs to be able to avoid a tremendous amount of extra work, downtime, and peril to himself and the lathe. Now that it's happened again, quite soon after the previous, am I still so crazy? Especially since it seems to be minor stuff, and last time, only a mechanical failure of an electrical component.

                            With these modern lathes with lots of safety features and clearly sub-par design/installation quality, this sort of thing sounds like it will continue to occur, and it will only get harder to keep hauling this lathe around.
                            But what seems minor at the time actually requires electrical trouble shooting practices that are grounded in a lot of previous experience and training. In fact I'd go as far as to suggest that it is only simple in the end thanks to that prior trouble shooting experience and early electrical training. To a newcomer to this sort of work it may as well be honest to goodness rocket surgery. Not totally impossible to learn. But far from easy.
                            Chilliwack BC, Canada

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Originally posted by BCRider View Post

                              But what seems minor at the time actually requires electrical trouble shooting practices that are grounded in a lot of previous experience and training. In fact I'd go as far as to suggest that it is only simple in the end thanks to that prior trouble shooting experience and early electrical training. To a newcomer to this sort of work it may as well be honest to goodness rocket surgery. Not totally impossible to learn. But far from easy.
                              It requires a mindset.....and usually the ability to do "differential diagnosis" of the electrical "stuff". That involves a sort of "built-in" checklist of "memory items" to look for.. Are the pilot lights lit? yes/no.... if not check outlet, switch, fuses/breaker, etc. "Did the relay close, yes/no". If not, what can cause that? If yes, then does it actually have power on it? Etc, etc, etc.
                              1601 2137 5683 1002 1437

                              Keep eye on ball.
                              Hashim Khan

                              If you look closely at a digital signal, you find out it is really analog......

                              Comment

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