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  • #16
    It also requires being familiar with how to read a wiring schematic.

    Like I said, it's only simple when one has a history with this sort of stuff. There's no shortage of folks that stop with "is it plugged in? Is the switch on? Is the fuse burned out?" and that's where it all stops if those things are met.
    Chilliwack BC, Canada

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    • #17
      Great gantry idea, top heavy trolley not so much. I think I'd like to try a simple winch of the type where th cable goes across from one end, down to the hook and back up then off to the far end so that the system is self-luffing. Then you can lower it down to a low level trolley.
      Am I the only one going to say aaaagh to the lift chains apparently round the chuck and tailstock? Newbies reading this don't do this at home although I concede it is a topic for endless speculation.

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      • #18
        Brian, it's clear you prefer to work by yourself, as do I. But may I make a suggestion? You have given much to the members this forum with your detailed engine designs and builds. Why not let the highly skilled craftsman on this forum help you when you need it. I can think of several top notch active members including myself that could troubleshoot your problem via photos, telephone, video or email. Or guide you through the troubleshooting process in open forum, scratch that idea.

        It's just another way for some of us to pay you back.

        Ron
        South Central Alaska

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        • #19
          If you don't have electrical troubleshooting skills, many local trades people do - electricians, HVAC, and appliance repair techs. I think it's insane to do all that work when 1 hr of a local persons time can fix it in place. You should have a ladder diagram in your manual or on the inside cover of the electrical panel that anyone familiar with electricity can use to diagnose problems. It's a road map or logic of how the machine works the end result on a lathe is the motor runs. Diagnosis can be done with power off. It is a simple process. First inspect and check all connections. Check incoming power and any fuses. Snug all terminal screws. Proceed on the diagram like reading a book. Left to right and top to bottom until the problem is found. Usually a start switch feeds power through a series of safeties to the motor contactor coil. If something is open preventing the motor from running you can work forward from the stop/start switch or backward from the contactor coil to find what is not closed in the circuit.

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          • #20
            With all do respect, that transfer table looks like an accident waiting to happen. Lathes are traditionally top heavy with weight biased towards the head stock. It's the nature of the beast. The tread width on those tires is much too close together. Just one small nail, chip, or other piece of debris and you risk a serious accident. When lathes fall they tend to fall forward landing on the controls and other important levers. Is there any way, do you have room, to expand the width between those wheels to add to the stability? Again, I don't mean to pee on your parade, but I see an issue and I feel the need to speak out about it.

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            • #21
              No, I couldn't make the wheelbase wider, because I wanted to park the thing as close to the cabinets as possible, and I had to maneuver and fit thru two 30" doorways between my truck and the finished position in my machine shop. Don't worry---I didn't aim it towards my machine shop and give it a push to see what would happen. In fact, I never let go of the lathe and transfer cart until it was stable and I was certain that it wouldn't topple over. As far as being concerned about where the lifting chains were attached, I wasn't about to rush out and purchase a lift truck with forks to pick up the lathe. I do what needs to be done, and I've been around for a long time. I do have an eye for my safety. I spent a lifetime building hot-rods, lifting and moving large V8 engines with transmissions attached. The only thing different now, is that I'm old. I'm amazed at how old I am. Why, just the other day I was thirty five. Thank you for your concern. If I was rich instead of good looking, I'd have called the $500 riggers to do the job.
              Brian Rupnow
              Design engineer
              Barrie, Ontario, Canada

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              • #22
                You CAN do both, you know. Have the width of base, and the narrowness to fit doors and snuggle up to the table.

                Just have an outrigger on each side to prevent tipping for most of the move, which folds in for the doors or the table. It does not actually need to touch the floor, so long as it keeps the maximum tip angle quite small.

                The goal is not to NEED to move it again, yes, but if you do need to, having a plan for that would be good. Even just a 2 x 4 per side, on a hinge, with a folding prop to hold it out in position would be a good precaution.

                1601 2137 5683 1002 1437

                Keep eye on ball.
                Hashim Khan

                If you look closely at a digital signal, you find out it is really analog......

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                • #23
                  Originally posted by brian Rupnow View Post
                  Joe Lee--No, they do not do in house repairs. They never have.
                  OK, thought I would ask. I know of a couple within a 60 mi. radius of me that do make house calls unless it's something that requires rebuilding / major overhauling. If the service tech person can't make the repair on site then the machine has to go to the service shop.

                  JL................

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                  • #24
                    I'm glad to see that you got it sorted out Brian. When I saw your cart I was reminded of the guy from a few years ago that had a lathe tip over on him and break his leg, but he probably wasn't a designer like you and hadn't thought it through like you had.

                    I can relate to working alone. Working with others doesn't always work for me either. Man over machine. I bought a South Bend heavy ten about 15 years ago and it wouldn't run. It had the proper 250 volt three phase plug and I spent something like 6 months off and on trying to figure out what was wrong with it. I finally figured out that someone had switched the ground and one hot wire in the plug. Once I figured that out it was fun making chips at home for the first time and it felt so good to finally triumph over the machine. It was also my first foray into three phase in my home shop.

                    Brian
                    OPEN EYES, OPEN EARS, OPEN MIND

                    THINK HARDER

                    BETTER TO HAVE TOOLS YOU DON'T NEED THAN TO NEED TOOLS YOU DON'T HAVE

                    MY NAME IS BRIAN AND I AM A TOOLOHOLIC

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                    • #25
                      I didn’t read all the replies but here’s what I gather and I’ll probably sound like a jerk but, you sound like a cheap f$&k but from your posts sound fairly intelligent so I can’t figure it out.

                      You don’t want to spent $200 or so dollars on a 3 jaw chuck for a machine that you use daily but have no problem toting the machine that you can barely handle in and out of your shop multiple times at the tune of hundreds of dollars for simple troubleshooting repairs?

                      I’m glad you got it done but what am I missing here?

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                      • #26
                        Originally posted by oxford View Post
                        I didn’t read all the replies but here’s what I gather and I’ll probably sound like a jerk but, you sound like a cheap f$&k but from your posts sound fairly intelligent so I can’t figure it out.

                        You don’t want to spent $200 or so dollars on a 3 jaw chuck for a machine that you use daily but have no problem toting the machine that you can barely handle in and out of your shop multiple times at the tune of hundreds of dollars for simple troubleshooting repairs?

                        I’m glad you got it done but what am I missing here?
                        He explained it clearly. He is good looking ,not rich. At 74 Brian is still pretty impressive. Im 57 and battling to cope with slowing down. I think maybe brian is also a bit stubborn and is not gracefully excepting that he is getting on. This is a good thing. He is exceptionally talented in certain aspects but I guess he gets frustrated not understanding electronics that much. I think Brian should reach out next time and ask for help to do a diagnostics via cellphone. .It seems that its time to learn the workings of the machine.

                        Reminds me of the time I had problems with my lathe. Two electricians later and my mate helped me figure out the problem. He works for Telkom, a telephone company and he specialized in switchgear operations. and fault finding. The electricians just took one look and said they cant help me.

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                        • #27
                          Sheesh.... Brian is a mechanical designer, and a very good shop workman to boot. He does not pretend to be an electrician, or electronics technician. Nobody is good at everything, and it's a practical approach to have the people who DO know all about the machine look at it and fix it.

                          Remember the old story about the guy who retired some time after designing a production machine that did exactly what was needed. After a year or two, the machine was not working right, and even with the good documentation, the folks at the plant could not fix it. So they called him back in. He listened to them, went out and looked at the machine, then opened a door on it and made an adjustment. It then worked fine. He put in his bill at $5000. The plant manager had a fit, saying "it only took you 10 minutes, this bill is ridiculous". So he re-submitted it, listing "adjusting machine $10, knowing what to do $4990".

                          Knowing what to do is the valuable part of any repair.

                          And, remember, there was some question about performance and eccentricity in the machine as well, so a double reason to have the folks who sell it fix it. I will admit I do not always practice what I just preached, but that is my choice, and what Brian did is his choice.

                          Originally posted by oxford View Post
                          I didn’t read all the replies but here’s what I gather and I’ll probably sound like a jerk but, you sound like a cheap f$&k .........
                          YES you do, rather. And, NO he is not,

                          Reading the replies always helps comprehension. Those "I did not read all the replies, but..." posts crack me up.... if you did not read, then how can you offer any advice or even ask a relevant question?

                          It's a fair deal if you read, and miss something in the thread, there is usually a lot to read and remember. But to not even bother to read, and then to go ahead and spout negative opinions, well, honestly it is a bit rude. What you are actually kinda saying is "I have no idea what I am talking about, and made zero effort to find out, but here is what I think anyway".

                          That sounds a bit cold? Well, yeah, it is supposed to.
                          Last edited by J Tiers; 11-22-2020, 03:27 AM.
                          1601 2137 5683 1002 1437

                          Keep eye on ball.
                          Hashim Khan

                          If you look closely at a digital signal, you find out it is really analog......

                          Comment


                          • #28
                            Originally posted by BCRider View Post

                            But what seems minor at the time actually requires electrical trouble shooting practices that are grounded in a lot of previous experience and training. In fact I'd go as far as to suggest that it is only simple in the end thanks to that prior trouble shooting experience and early electrical training. To a newcomer to this sort of work it may as well be honest to goodness rocket surgery. Not totally impossible to learn. But far from easy.
                            Originally posted by J Tiers View Post

                            It requires a mindset.....and usually the ability to do "differential diagnosis" of the electrical "stuff". That involves a sort of "built-in" checklist of "memory items" to look for.. Are the pilot lights lit? yes/no.... if not check outlet, switch, fuses/breaker, etc. "Did the relay close, yes/no". If not, what can cause that? If yes, then does it actually have power on it? Etc, etc, etc.
                            Yes, you two are right. It's certainly doable. I had let dad do 99% of the wiring in the past, as I wasn't much comfortable. Slowly I took a little bit more of it on, but wiring the Sidney was my first real testament. With some googling, a little bit of mulitmeter knowledge, and lots of thinking, I was able to set up a great control circuit with reversing contactor and all that jazz. Now, that's still no digital stuff like Brian has, and no crummy caps either (single phase is my bane). But it's all doable. I have a huge advantage in that I'm young, and since I'm actively learning most every day for school, it's very easy to get into that mindset. Like the others have said, with a thread on here, some patience, and maybe a phone call to some of the better electrickens on here, I think he could be sorted much faster than a trip to a shop.
                            21" Royersford Excelsior CamelBack Drillpress Restoration
                            1943 Sidney 16x54 Lathe Restoration

                            Comment


                            • #29
                              Originally posted by BCRider View Post
                              It also requires being familiar with how to read a wiring schematic.

                              Like I said, it's only simple when one has a history with this sort of stuff. There's no shortage of folks that stop with "is it plugged in? Is the switch on? Is the fuse burned out?" and that's where it all stops if those things are met.
                              I've repaired switch cabinets and done other electronic stuff and I started from 0.

                              One of my first projects was to make my own TIG pedal, I had a schematic from the builders of my welding machine, but I didn't know how to read a schematic. I made posts on electronic forums and they guided and helped me through it. Same with the electrical box for my FP2, got help with that and I got it working again with my own addition for a new on-off switch on the lathe and an extra 3ph plug on the electrical box. Since then I've also repaired electronics in my welders and worked on a circuit of my own for a pulsing unit for my tig.

                              Experience builds fast once you start, what you need is the mindset to say "I want to do this myself and I want to learn to do it". If you don't want, though...
                              Last edited by DennisCA; 11-22-2020, 03:38 AM.

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                              • #30
                                I am curious about other countries. $500 is hectic to deliver a small lathe. When i think of Canada in my mind i picture a beautiful place but very cold with bears chasing you and it takes two days of travel to fetch the Sunday newspaper. Also I think I watch too many movies where I see you have a storm and your car gets buried.

                                For me personally (living in Africa) its sometimes very hard to get machining spares or help or material. Its also expensive. But no ,we dont have lions roaming the streets. We have far more dangerous threats. I may have a totally ignorant understanding of living in Canada but it looks like you have to be pretty tough living there.

                                This forum has been a great help to me when I need help.

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