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Moving my lathe

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  • #31
    We live in the north end of Toronto. I used to live out in the suburbs. About 80% of Canads;s population lives within 100 miles of the US Border. Our day to day life is probably just like that in any urban environment.
    However, we have a cottage on a river about 125
    miles north.We have 6 acres, from about now till April likely need a 4 wheel drive vehicle to access it, but even it has electricity and phone but very poor wifi etc .
    We do not usually have lions around unless they escape from zoos, but we have bears, deer and moose to contend with on a pretty regular basis,. no one is surprised by them.
    We have reasonably good industrial suppliers, Princess Auto ( A Canadian version of Harbor Freight) Busy Bee tools( Owned by the brother of the fellow who owns Grizzly) Canadian Tire( Predominatly Automotive but good for sone HSM items)
    Winters are cold and long and sometimes involve lots of snow. We have Snow tires on all our vehicles, if going anywhere off the busy routes I carry a shovel, tow ropes, sand , etc people living in the north carry more and many have winches fitted to their pick up trucks.
    Most houses have basements, great for indoor workshops..
    Hope this paints a bit of a picture of our part of the world.
    Regards David Powell,

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    • #32
      Originally posted by The Metal Butcher View Post
      Last time this occurred I was hounded for suggesting Brain learn some minor electrical repairs to be able to avoid a tremendous amount of extra work, downtime, and peril to himself and the lathe.
      .
      I don't get it either, but I also know it would be awfully dull if we were all the same. I tend to approach things with the mindset "if another human can, I can" which doesn't always work out perfectly, but man, it keeps you learning! Except for maybe a bed regrind on a hardened bed (too hard to scrape) I can't think anything that I'd have to send a machine out for (not including parts, e.g. a motor rewind or hard chroming). In fairness, it probably also drops me down some time wasting rabbit holes, but it also avoids the time and expense of moving machines. Brian certainly has ample aptitude but if he just doesn't want to, its his shop/lathe/dough. I'd be glad to help Brian if he wanted it, but we're 45 minutes to 1.5 hours away depending on traffic and how much radar risk you want to take....my commute is 100 miles so its kind of hard to get me the car for anything else lol
      Last edited by Mcgyver; 11-22-2020, 12:37 PM.
      in Toronto Ontario - where are you?

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      • #33
        Have to say it..... in the first picture, he is lifting the lathe by the chuck/spindle with a chain !!! Bottom line, you NEVER lift a lathe by its spindle ! Most here are aware of that but Brian is not apparently. He loves his lathe and lifting it that way is begging for trouble (not lifting, operational problems later... ) Maybe, just maybe we see the cause of his chuck problems.

        Edit : Looking further at that pic, it does appear the other chain is attached to the tailstock ! Equally a bad as attaching to the spindle. Could be a illusion from the pic but it sure looks that way.
        Last edited by Sparky_NY; 11-22-2020, 11:18 AM.

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        • #34
          I think this lathe is far too light to damage anything if lifted by the spindle.

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          • #35
            Originally posted by plunger View Post
            I think this lathe is far too light to damage anything if lifted by the spindle.
            I'm sure you are right......Can't be sure with that machine, but my Logan 200 has a headstock bearing with a load rating of about 8000 lb (3600kg). I expect that if his is even half of that, there is more danger of scraping the paint with the chain than doing damage. And his bearings are likely larger with a higher rating.

            OK, if the spindle gets pulled-on in the "out" direction, the load rating is likely lower than the "inward" (toward headstock) rating, and both are likely lower than the radial rating, but even a rating of "only" 600kg would be far more than the mass of the machine.

            I still would probably not do it myself, just on principle, but the damage potential is low.
            3751 6193 2700 3517

            Keep eye on ball.
            Hashim Khan

            If you look closely at a digital signal, you find out it is really analog......

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            • #36
              Originally posted by Sparky_NY View Post
              Have to say it..... in the first picture, he is lifting the lathe by the chuck/spindle with a chain !!! Bottom line, you NEVER lift a lathe by its spindle ! Most here are aware of that but Brian is not apparently. He loves his lathe and lifting it that way is begging for trouble (not lifting, operational problems later... ) Maybe, just maybe we see the cause of his chuck problems.

              Edit : Looking further at that pic, it does appear the other chain is attached to the tailstock ! Equally a bad as attaching to the spindle. Could be a illusion from the pic but it sure looks that way.
              Sometimes it's a necessity to lift by the spindle. I've done it, others have done it with no issues. I do agree it's best to avoid a chain, and it's better to stick a bar through and lift from both ends, when possible. I also agree that chaining right on the tailstock barrel is a bit rough. However, with no cabinet, this is a very top heavy lathe. Grabbing by the bed webs like usual ain't gonna cut it.

              Click image for larger version  Name:	IMG_7027S.jpg Views:	0 Size:	255.4 KB ID:	1911711
              21" Royersford Excelsior CamelBack Drillpress Restoration
              1943 Sidney 16x54 Lathe Restoration

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              • #37
                My immediate thought about lifting from the headstock is that many headstock are seperate castings that are very carefully aligned to the bed with bolts and adjusting bolts. Always lift from the webs of the bed. Maybe a 2nd strap that maybe only has 20% of the total load on something more delicate for balancing, or just get a load balancer, and use the webs.

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                • #38
                  I believe Brain's lathe weighs in the neighborhood of 500 pounds so not very heavy.
                  Glenn Bird

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                  • #39
                    Originally posted by The Metal Butcher View Post
                    However, with no cabinet, this is a very top heavy lathe. Grabbing by the bed webs like usual ain't gonna cut it.
                    It may or may not have worked in your situation but put the straps through the bed web as close to the headstock as possible. You then put a bar through the headstock that would hit against the straps if things start to get tippy.

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                    • #40
                      Originally posted by oxford View Post

                      It may or may not have worked in your situation but put the straps through the bed web as close to the headstock as possible. You then put a bar through the headstock that would hit against the straps if things start to get tippy.
                      That would probably work real well especially if you swapped the straps to the opposite side which would put some natural preload on them. Have a like and thanks for the tip.

                      It wouldn't have worked in my situation, but then again, that's what happens when you try to unload 5k lbs of lathe with well undersized equipment.
                      21" Royersford Excelsior CamelBack Drillpress Restoration
                      1943 Sidney 16x54 Lathe Restoration

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                      • #41
                        I think this is the best method for moving many lathes, or a variation of it. I use a heavy angle iron for the bottom support, a long 5/8" eyebolt, and I used a 2x4 on top of the ways to protect them. I used a piece of tubing over the eyebolt to take up the extra length of it and allow me to clamp the ways. The top of the eye is something like 10 - 12 inches above the ways on my 9" SB and it's as solid as you could hope for. Easy to adjust for balance too.
                        Location: Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, Canada

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