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O/T: Computer Q. Moving files from one machine to another?

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  • O/T: Computer Q. Moving files from one machine to another?

    I am really sorry, this has been hashed over many times. I tried a search here but was unsuccessful.

    I use an old dell desktop computer for my TV to go online. The one I am posting with right now.

    It has been throwing a fit (blue screen of death) lately. I took advantage of the nice prices being offered now and bought an inexpensive Inspiron from dell.

    I need to move files from BSOD to the new computer via hard line. What hard line? Whatever works. Ether, USB I dont know.

    I dont want to do it wireless. Am I asking for something that is not available?

    Just files, no programs and there is too much to fit on a USB thumb drive.

    Again. Sorry for the O/T post. Its just that you guys are my brain bank for these things.

    Thanks. JR

    Click image for larger version

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    My old yahoo group. Bridgeport Mill Group

    https://groups.yahoo.com/neo/groups/...port_mill/info

  • #2
    I use a USB external hard drive, you can move your files, and have a backup.

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    • #3
      I find the easiest way to do it is to use a USB to ATA cord. This lets you take the drive out of the old computer and thus the Operating system and hardware problems won't prevent the copy.

      $20 gets you a multi function device that will connect ATA/IDE and SATA drives to a USB port. You will want to boot your laptop and then connect the USB cable. Then, (of course) you will need to find the files that you want to copy since they will not be under "My Documents" or whatever your operating system calls it.

      This is assuming that your old hard drive does not have problems that are causing the BSOD.

      Dan
      At the end of the project, there is a profound difference between spare parts and left over parts.

      Location: SF East Bay.

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      • #4
        Originally posted by metalfixer View Post
        I use a USB external hard drive, you can move your files, and have a backup.
        I have an Iomega USB hard drive. The BSOD computer wont recognize it. My other computers do. So the drive is ok, the old, very old computer might have issues. Thank you. JR
        My old yahoo group. Bridgeport Mill Group

        https://groups.yahoo.com/neo/groups/...port_mill/info

        Comment


        • #5
          Originally posted by danlb View Post
          I find the easiest way to do it is to use a USB to ATA cord. This lets you take the drive out of the old computer and thus the Operating system and hardware problems won't prevent the copy.

          $20 gets you a multi function device that will connect ATA/IDE and SATA drives to a USB port. You will want to boot your laptop and then connect the USB cable. Then, (of course) you will need to find the files that you want to copy since they will not be under "My Documents" or whatever your operating system calls it.

          This is assuming that your old hard drive does not have problems that are causing the BSOD.

          Dan
          I like... I could use that for my other computers as well. Can you recommend a devise?

          Also, I own six laptops and dont use any of them Yeah, me and lap tops dont play so well.

          Thanks, JR

          Edit: Found one, 7.99, not bad.

          Are there no USB to USB options then? Didnt really want to open the computer up. JR
          Last edited by JRouche; 11-28-2020, 05:43 PM.
          My old yahoo group. Bridgeport Mill Group

          https://groups.yahoo.com/neo/groups/...port_mill/info

          Comment


          • #6
            You could try running Linux from a dvd (assuming the BSOD has a dvd player). If it boots, you may be able to copy the files.
            p.s. Linux really isn't that much different than Windows, so it shouldn't be too hard to figure out how to copy files.

            Comment


            • #7
              Originally posted by elf View Post
              You could try running Linux from a dvd (assuming the BSOD has a dvd player). If it boots, you may be able to copy the files.
              p.s. Linux really isn't that much different than Windows, so it shouldn't be too hard to figure out how to copy files.
              Im sorry, I may have mis-represented my issue. The BSOD is intermittent and getting worse.

              So I can start it, operate it well, till she crashes. Thanks. JR
              My old yahoo group. Bridgeport Mill Group

              https://groups.yahoo.com/neo/groups/...port_mill/info

              Comment


              • #8
                The USB to USB devices do exist, but it takes a software driver to make one end or the other to act as the "host". I would not trust a computer with BSOD problems to transfer the files reliably. You can connect a pair of computers more easily with a USB dongle that acts as an ethernet connection.

                You will find that the older USB cards (1.1 and 2.0) are really, really slow.

                Dan
                At the end of the project, there is a profound difference between spare parts and left over parts.

                Location: SF East Bay.

                Comment


                • #9
                  Take it apart and remove the hard drive and put it in another computer.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    The best thing about what danlb wrote is that the drive is connected to the NEW computer, but is not in it.. So if there are goofy motherboard issues (fairly common in older computers) they will no longer affect things. And, any OS issues on the drive are not a problem.

                    You can get pretty much anything you want off the other drive. The one issue is that you cannot generally install programs off the old drive to the new drive. That is only possible if you have "cloned" the drive onto the new computer, which obviously clones the OS as well, which is not what you want if you are moving to a new OS, such as from 7 to 10, etc.
                    3751 6193 2700 3517

                    Keep eye on ball.
                    Hashim Khan

                    If you look closely at a digital signal, you find out it is really analog......

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                    • #11
                      Your BSOD shows a PFN_LIST_CORRUPT error which is likely to be a drive fault not a motherboard issue. I suggest Google 'PFN_LIST_CORRUPT' and get the most information you can before taking action.

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                      • #12
                        Like what Dan said, or get an external hard disk Bay where you slide your HD into, plugs into the new computer via USB. This would be the easiest thing to do.
                        PFN is your page file list, it tells the computer where your files are located on the disk, which would be a disk issue.
                        Last edited by RB211; 11-28-2020, 10:37 PM.

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                        • #13
                          Um, did I not say that?

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                          • #14
                            Originally posted by danlb View Post
                            You can connect a pair of computers more easily with a USB dongle that acts as an ethernet connection.

                            You will find that the older USB cards (1.1 and 2.0) are really, really slow.

                            Dan
                            Ok Dan, this is probably where I should have started.

                            I like the ether cable connect much more than USB. To be honest I am USB protocol ignorant. I would rather work with the better cat5 line. Get right to the heart of the files VS messing around with USB. I dont know USB so its uncomfortable for me.

                            Speed? Not an issue. USB 2 is ten times slower than 3. Heck firewire has them both beat, I imagine.

                            I would anticipate 1.4 or so TB will move in a time line that is sufficient. As long as the Host can keep from crashing during the transfer LOL

                            I picked up a 5TB USB removable hard drive from online. Why? I checked the older iomega drive on a couple boxes in my office. Some saw it and some did not. I have a Wester digital external HD also old and tried it with the BSOD. No go, and it works with all the other boxes.

                            So why a new HD? Was almost comparable to the USB patch cord and will have drivers for my broke azzed computer, I hope

                            I couldnt justify 28 bucks for a USB patch cord that I may use once. HD will be good to have. Thanks.... JR




                            My old yahoo group. Bridgeport Mill Group

                            https://groups.yahoo.com/neo/groups/...port_mill/info

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Originally posted by The Artful Bodger View Post
                              Your BSOD shows a PFN_LIST_CORRUPT error which is likely to be a drive fault not a motherboard issue. I suggest Google 'PFN_LIST_CORRUPT' and get the most information you can before taking action.
                              Yes Sir. I did. That is why I have ol man Jeff Bees delivering this new external HD tout suite. I am hoping the internal drive can handle the transfer... Thank you. JR
                              My old yahoo group. Bridgeport Mill Group

                              https://groups.yahoo.com/neo/groups/...port_mill/info

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