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OT: is heat gun stripping old paint really a lead hazard?

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  • #31
    I have this idea of adding heat elements to my 1.5" scraper so the paint doesn't accumulate. I found these supposedly 50w ceramic plates but IDK if they really have enough wattage:

    ttps://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B01MT9M7C5.

    I was figuring one on each side mounted with thermal paste.
    Location: Jersey City NJ USA

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    • #32
      Since we (some of us, anyway) are using anecdotal evidence here, I have worked in electronics since my teenage years, using good old lead-tin solder. And yes, it does reach the melting temperature when you solder with it: that's the whole idea. And it rubs off the wire and onto your hands as you handle it.

      I am not 76, 77 in less than a month, and still no problems from that work. I have lead-tin solder in my shop and on my electronic work table next to my desk here in my office and still use it.

      I have regular check-ups and blood tests for at least the past 25 years and have never been told of any problems from the lead that I handle. If it is going to kill me, I suspect that event is at least 10 to 20 years in the future. Personally, I think that the fat in the foods we all eat is a much greater danger to my health and to that of anyone else here. I would not hesitate to remove old paint with a hot air gun. When I use lead-tin solder I do make sure there is good ventilation. This was not started by any concern about the lead or tin in the solder. The vapors from the flux are much greater and likely more of a danger to my health than any trace amounts of lead or tin that may vaporize.

      I do not dispute medical claims of health problems from lead based paints. These old paints will gradually wear off the painted surfaces and any abrasive processes (something rubbing against the paint) will probably result in paint particles being inhaled and in some cases, eaten. The danger with this is likely due to constant exposure over long periods of time. Such old, painted surfaces should be properly made passive to protect the people who are constantly exposed to them.

      Also workers in factories and other places of work where large amounts of lead are melted and kept in a liquid state are probably at risk. Good ventilation in such places is certainly the least of the measures that should be taken.

      But the minimal exposure that I have had from using lead-tin solder and a one time or occasional use of hot air to remove lead based paint are certainly not going to be a problem for anyone.
      Paul A.
      SE Texas

      And if you look REAL close at an analog signal,
      You will find that it has discrete steps.

      Comment


      • #33
        The house I grew up in, it turns out, had for many years, a LEAD supply line from the water pipes under the street. However, due to the extremely hard water in the area, the lead pipe (which was replaced long after I left) was almost certainly lined with a thick coating of hard water scale. The house had been built in 1914, and had had the hard water depositing scale ever since, for a matter of 42 years before we moved in.

        In any event, there were no adverse effects on IQ nor general nervous system issues as a result. And, I have also used lead solder for something on the order of 55 years.

        One can never know "what would have happened if......", but I have little to complain about that could be in any way ascribed to lead. Probably significantly more input from nuclear weapons tests, and general pollution, plastics residues, and the like, not to mention diet, although we eat pretty healthy meals in general.
        CNC machines only go through the motions.

        Ideas expressed may be mine, or from anyone else in the universe.
        Not responsible for clerical errors. Or those made by lay people either.
        Number formats and units may be chosen at random depending on what day it is.
        I reserve the right to use a number system with any integer base without prior notice.
        Generalizations are understood to be "often" true, but not true in every case.

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        • #34
          I am friends with James from Engineers Workshop on youtube.
          He works as a water treatment engineer (mechanical).
          Once we got to talking about the Flint Michigan lead pipes problem.
          He knows quite a bit about chemistry, and tells me, depending on the
          type of pipes the city uses, require different anti-corrosion aditives.
          He said the engineer in charge of Flint absolutely used the wrong
          chemicals. They saved $3600 per year by not using the proper
          additive for their lead pipes. And history tells how much this debacle
          actually cost the municipality. He tells me lead pipes are not a problem
          at all, with proper additives at the pump house. I guess lead oxide is
          not harmful to humans, but the pure form of lead is.

          --Doozer
          DZER

          Comment


          • #35
            The pure lead may or may not be, but the "biological availability" of lead varies with the particular compound. Some are quite active, and others considerably less so.

            I have no idea what was or was not in the pipe at the house.

            Flint also changed the source of water, which changed the effect on the lead pipes. My understanding is that the water also affects the anti-corrosion requirements a great deal.
            CNC machines only go through the motions.

            Ideas expressed may be mine, or from anyone else in the universe.
            Not responsible for clerical errors. Or those made by lay people either.
            Number formats and units may be chosen at random depending on what day it is.
            I reserve the right to use a number system with any integer base without prior notice.
            Generalizations are understood to be "often" true, but not true in every case.

            Comment


            • #36
              For sure it does.

              -D
              DZER

              Comment


              • #37
                Originally posted by J Tiers View Post
                Flint also changed the source of water, which changed the effect on the lead pipes. My understanding is that the water also affects the anti-corrosion requirements a great deal.
                Yes, I seem to recall the new supply was more acidic, and they didn't buffer it like they should have, so it ate away the scale and ate into the lead.

                Location: Jersey City NJ USA

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                • #38
                  The point of least solubility of lead in water is ph approximately 9.5. That is somewhat basic, so anything to the acidic side might increase the solubility. Acidic water could also eat away at the protective hard water scale, which is generally basic.

                  Nost water companies try to keep the PH at that point.

                  As for attacking the lead and significantly dissolving it, I do not know. Aluminum is not bothered as much by strong acid as by weaker solutions. Do not know for sure about lead, since aluminum may be a special case due to the surface activity. I am pretty sure lead is not too significantly attacked by many stronger acids. Certainly the lead-acid battery is a place where a variety of "strengths" of acid solution may be encountered, and it is good for the long term. The reaction is not "poisoned" by any dissolved lead, in any case.
                  CNC machines only go through the motions.

                  Ideas expressed may be mine, or from anyone else in the universe.
                  Not responsible for clerical errors. Or those made by lay people either.
                  Number formats and units may be chosen at random depending on what day it is.
                  I reserve the right to use a number system with any integer base without prior notice.
                  Generalizations are understood to be "often" true, but not true in every case.

                  Comment


                  • #39
                    Originally posted by Richard P Wilson View Post
                    The only things I remember from replacing several 100 year old steel railway bridges, with layers of lead paint was that the burners who cut them up had to have a blood test for lead before the job started, another one when it was finished, and were advised to drink plenty of milk. Why the milk, I don't know, but that was the advice at the time, 25 years ago.

                    If you are doing a restoration involving stripping layers of wall paper, and come across very old green paper, thats probably got arsenic in it-----.
                    My dad worked at a steel plant (Albion Neath) where leaded steel was every day, everyone had 2 tickets for 1 pint of milk a day, think they thought it helped mitigate lead poisoning, it didn’t work, everyone got lead poisoning, plus they fetched it home, I think everyone in the area got it as the next door place was a ship breaking yard ( thos W ward) battleships cut up for scrap, lead paint and cutting torches don’t mix, all quite safe according to the company’s!
                    mark

                    Comment


                    • #40
                      Originally posted by Paul Alciatore View Post
                      Since we (some of us, anyway) are using anecdotal evidence here, I have worked in electronics since my teenage years, using good old lead-tin solder. And yes, it does reach the melting temperature when you solder with it: that's the whole idea. And it rubs off the wire and onto your hands as you handle it.

                      I am not 76, 77 in less than a month, and still no problems from that work. I have lead-tin solder in my shop and on my electronic work table next to my desk here in my office and still use it.

                      I have regular check-ups and blood tests for at least the past 25 years and have never been told of any problems from the lead that I handle. If it is going to kill me, I suspect that event is at least 10 to 20 years in the future. Personally, I think that the fat in the foods we all eat is a much greater danger to my health and to that of anyone else here. I would not hesitate to remove old paint with a hot air gun. When I use lead-tin solder I do make sure there is good ventilation. This was not started by any concern about the lead or tin in the solder. The vapors from the flux are much greater and likely more of a danger to my health than any trace amounts of lead or tin that may vaporize.

                      I do not dispute medical claims of health problems from lead based paints. These old paints will gradually wear off the painted surfaces and any abrasive processes (something rubbing against the paint) will probably result in paint particles being inhaled and in some cases, eaten. The danger with this is likely due to constant exposure over long periods of time. Such old, painted surfaces should be properly made passive to protect the people who are constantly exposed to them.

                      Also workers in factories and other places of work where large amounts of lead are melted and kept in a liquid state are probably at risk. Good ventilation in such places is certainly the least of the measures that should be taken.

                      But the minimal exposure that I have had from using lead-tin solder and a one time or occasional use of hot air to remove lead based paint are certainly not going to be a problem for anyone.
                      FWIW, apparently the military did tests on lead exposure from soldering and from fumes and never found anything. Its pretty safe.

                      Comment


                      • #41
                        Side Note now we are talking about heavy metals.

                        Mercury in the fish we eat.

                        I love Ocean fish to eat. The Merc issue is for the young and Moms prego.

                        Us old farts can eat as much Ocean fish as we want. The merc wont kill us.

                        For me cod. JR

                        Comment


                        • #42
                          Originally posted by JRouche View Post
                          Side Note now we are talking about heavy metals.

                          Mercury in the fish we eat.

                          I love Ocean fish to eat. The Merc issue is for the young and Moms prego.

                          Us old farts can eat as much Ocean fish as we want. The merc wont kill us.

                          For me cod. JR
                          No the Mercury probably won't affect you. What of all the contaminated water the Japanese have been releasing from the Fukashima plant into the ocean? Eating any of that might.
                          Last edited by reggie_obe; 12-26-2020, 05:42 PM.

                          Comment


                          • #43
                            Originally posted by macona View Post

                            FWIW, apparently the military did tests on lead exposure from soldering and from fumes and never found anything. Its pretty safe.

                            They also did experiments with LSD, and direct radiation exposure from bomb blasts. No problem there either.

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