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Heating problem on Toyota Hilux pickup. Machining related!

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  • Mcgyver
    replied
    Originally posted by Willy View Post
    Those fancy dealerships and bloated staff don' come cheap

    .
    I know. I'm the market, but man, I get shivers standing there looking at the building....thinking buying new is my hard earned dollars paying for all this crap. A guy I know has a newer dealership, construction cost him $25 million. How many Putz's do they have to move through to pay for that!

    I get the shakes so badly about it I just can't bring myself to buy a new car
    Last edited by Mcgyver; 12-23-2020, 09:31 PM.

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  • bob_s
    replied
    Most likely the reason that the dealership wants you to part with your old Hilux can be found at:

    The old "Top Gear" from BBCtv

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xnWKz7Cthkk
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xTPnIpjodA8&list=PL8Oh5xwN-3Yyddtxd
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kFnVZXQD5_k

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  • Mike279
    replied
    Maybe fill the recesses with epoxy and then drill through for a metal shaft. Then epoxy the shaft in and cross drill for small pins if needed.

    Leave a comment:


  • redlee
    replied
    Originally posted by Black Forest View Post
    Click image for larger version

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ID:	1917509 Click image for larger version

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ID:	1917510 This is what my pickup looks like at the moment. I got the box from the dealer today. It took me two hours to get it apart. There was one little screw hidden behind some foam that took me an hour to find. I had to cut one shaft in order to get it apart. The gear on the end of the shaft had three tabs that engage when the gear is pushed onto the shaft which is buried in a part of the housing. I attach a picture of the broken part that started this whole mess.
    While your in there I don't know if you have mice problem buts its an easy fix now to screen up the fresh air intake port.

    Leave a comment:


  • Black Forest
    replied
    Click image for larger version

Name:	20201223_205029[1].jpg
Views:	154
Size:	1.61 MB
ID:	1917509 Click image for larger version

Name:	20201222_105236.jpg
Views:	146
Size:	1.28 MB
ID:	1917510 This is what my pickup looks like at the moment. I got the box from the dealer today. It took me two hours to get it apart. There was one little screw hidden behind some foam that took me an hour to find. I had to cut one shaft in order to get it apart. The gear on the end of the shaft had three tabs that engage when the gear is pushed onto the shaft which is buried in a part of the housing. I attach a picture of the broken part that started this whole mess.

    Leave a comment:


  • wierdscience
    replied
    Oh, that's the infernal "blend door" that goes bad in everything these days and costs eye watering money to fix. The one in my dad's old van went out, $50 for the part, $500 in labor to fix it. I took one look at where it was at and gladly paid the $500. I figure half the labor rate was really for buying the mechanic alcohol to cope.

    This is why I want a mid to late 70's Ford 250 to resto from the ground up. The dash will be gutted/torn out and replaced with a gauge cluster and pvc drain spout for blower ducts.
    Last edited by wierdscience; 12-23-2020, 03:21 PM.

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  • redlee
    replied
    Originally posted by tom_d View Post

    True dat. On my jeep the factory starts with the heater core and builds the vehicle around it. According to the service manual it's an entire day's labor just to get to the heater core. $125 for a good quality aftermarket core, ?$$$$? in labor
    I have a 99 Dodge 2500 pickup, same thing heater core leaking.
    'Took me 14 hours, remove dash board, change heater core and reinstall dashboard.
    If it happens again im reaching for the jigsaw and doing an autopsy from above.

    Leave a comment:


  • mattthemuppet
    replied
    george - quite often if you have at least one programmed key you can program replacement keys yourself. There are websites online that detail the "secret sequence" that locksmiths use. Some of them are pretty comical - plug and unplug drivers seatbelt 10 times in 30 seconds then open the door twice and honk on the horn for example. Re-keying the tumbler can be pretty straightforward too, depending on the model and type of key. Just in case it comes up again. (Also another experience from my Focus..)

    Leave a comment:


  • wmgeorge
    replied
    Yep. I was quoted by a Toyota dealer for replacing the Ign keyed tumbler and 2 new keys cut and programed on my 2015 Tacoma pickup---- $1000. We need to program 2 keys..... WTF its about a 10 minute job with the programmer. I have a Automotive good locksmith to rebuild the tumbler lock and 2 keys, $300 tops he said.

    Leave a comment:


  • Doozer
    replied
    Making things easier to work on and service is where medium-duty trucks really are better.
    I mean like F-500 to F-800 and C50 to C60, you know the series.
    Tilt front ends make it easier to work on the engine, and at least the more professional
    brands like Freightliner, Pete, Kenny, and Mack had dashboards that were easy to take apart.
    Ford and GM, not so much easier with their dashboards, due to their pickup truck lineage.
    Some of those 1 ton pickups with V8 diesels, think Ford and GM, you have to remove the cab
    to work on rear parts of the engine. No thank you. Tilt front end is much better.
    With medium duty trucks, tires last over 100,000 miles too. Another nice benefit.
    Everyone wants to limit themselves to a 1 ton chassis. Not sure why they think small.
    A personality flaw perhaps.

    --Doozer

    Leave a comment:


  • Mike279
    replied
    I helped a nephew replace a heater core on a small Chevy pickup twenty years ago. It took us all day as we removed the whole dashboard to get to the firewall. We covered the driveway with parts and when finished we were thrilled to have only a few screws left over. The core cost was around twenty five dollars. Having heat in Central New York in the Winter priceless.

    Leave a comment:


  • mattthemuppet
    replied
    that's pretty reasonable.

    fixerup - yeah, that's a car where small hands and double jointed arms are a major plus. Another joy - replacing the water pump involved jacking the engine up and THEN DOWN to move it past the frame rail. Not too dissimilar from a Mini that I replaced the water pump pulley on. Had to use a block of wood and a crow bar to be able to remove it. Bleh.

    Leave a comment:


  • Black Forest
    replied
    They quoted the labor at 800 Euros.

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  • tom_d
    replied
    Originally posted by dian View Post
    i assume the unit is burried in the dash. my mechanic spent over a day to get to an a/c component and again assemble all the stuff on a jeep, mostly lying on his back. im just saying, a large part of that amount might go into this.
    True dat. On my jeep the factory starts with the heater core and builds the vehicle around it. According to the service manual it's an entire day's labor just to get to the heater core. $125 for a good quality aftermarket core, ?$$$$? in labor

    Leave a comment:


  • Mike279
    replied
    My friend had a Toyota Corolla(90 something model year) that had a similar issue and the dealer quoted 2000 dollars for the repair. I went to the dealership and saw the car apart and the vent flap shaft had worn the hole which caused it to jam. I figured a washer welded to the side would fix it easily so we told the service manager our plan was to tow the car home. We would repair the vent door and then we would tow the car back and they would reinstall the dash and all the other parts. That was quoted at 500 dollars but wait, suddenly the tech could make the repair and whole job was done at 600 dollars.

    Leave a comment:

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