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  • Hard facing video

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0QVCs4T7uCg

  • #2
    Interesting approach, but it's finished work on the edge of that hammer is less than desirable.

    JL....

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    • #3
      I am sorry, but do not understand your comment. Could you expand on that?



      Originally posted by JoeLee View Post
      Interesting approach, but it's finished work on the edge of that hammer is less than desirable.

      JL....
      Paul A.
      SE Texas

      And if you look REAL close at an analog signal,
      You will find that it has discrete steps.

      Comment


      • #4
        Originally posted by JoeLee View Post
        Interesting approach, but it's finished work on the edge of that hammer is less than desirable.

        JL....
        Well, it IS a chipping hammer after all. Straight off the grinder or at best given a lick with the flat flap wheel. And the in tight close up isn't all that kind to the looks. Trust me, we don't want to really see actor's faces in that close either... at least not on a big format screen! So.... I'd say he did just what he wanted and needed for what he's using it for.

        And a slick little trick for the toolbox as well! Just get to get my welding area cleaned up and running the TIG setup.
        Chilliwack BC, Canada

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        • #5
          Thanks Stu. I watch as much of his stuff as I can. Then I go make ugly welds in my shop JR

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          • #6
            has anybody tried the drill? i doubt it really works, i think its going to break of.

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            • #7
              As TIG filler you mean? I've done it. Works a treat. The tip of his hammer may break off if he's beating the crap out of the welds, but for gentle chipping and "raking" like he described it will probably be fine. The "textbook" proper way to do this would be to anneal the hammer after welding and then reharden.

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              • #8
                The "textbook" proper way to do this would be to anneal the hammer after welding and then reharden.
                I'd agree with you but for the fact that he showed how the head of the cheap chippers is so soft that it's only an alloy step or two above mild steel to start with. So a good chance that it would not harden to start with.

                I'm sure that this trick would not work if the hammer was being used to re-form the steel. But for what he's doing and how he's doing it it's more about abrasion resistance. And the HSS of the welded on bits should handle that very nicely.
                Chilliwack BC, Canada

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                • #9
                  Yeah, that's pretty much what I just said. And it doesn't matter if the base metal is low carbon and soft - melting the base metal and HSS together during welding means that some of the carbon and other alloying elements will diffuse from the HSS into the low carbon steel - and it WILL become brittle in the transition zone without the anneal and post-anneal heat treat. As I already mentioned, if he's not banging the thing like a brute it will probably be okay. Start hitting hard and it absolutely will break off.

                  A solution to this might be to make a couple little sockets in the end of the hammer and braze in larger HSS ends. That would give some room for resharpening also.
                  Last edited by eKretz; 12-24-2020, 03:59 PM.

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                  • #10
                    Oh, sorry, I misunderstood what you were intending. I was thinking that you were referring to an alternate to welding being to harden and re-temper the original hammer head instead of doing the welded on drill caps.

                    good point about the transition zones. What about simply heating them up to a spring like blue? No, that won't be enough I suspect. it's the mixing of the alloys that is the issue.

                    I know that I've got a lever rifle part which is about .01 too short to properly cock the hammer. My intent was to try hard surfacing a blob on the end and grind or otherwise machine it back to the new length. I'll have to play with options and be sure that this mixing in the heat affected zone doesn't kick me in the butt.
                    Chilliwack BC, Canada

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                    • #11
                      Use something else besides HSS. HSS doesn't temper like regular carbon steel - and in the transition zone who knows what you will have in terms of alloy/composition...

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                      • #12
                        I've used O-1 and A-2 drill rod for filler in build up repair and then when through the normal heatreat process and had good results. So why not? Besides if it's a cheap HSS drill it's going to be just barely HSS to start with.

                        For some good, general purpose hardfacing alloy for tool and wear surface build up, this stuff is the ticket

                        https://www.airgas.com/p/STO11929200
                        I just need one more tool,just one!

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Originally posted by eKretz View Post
                          Use something else besides HSS. HSS doesn't temper like regular carbon steel - and in the transition zone who knows what you will have in terms of alloy/composition...
                          I like that. Great suggestion.

                          I just hit "post" when another improvised hard filler hit me. The cheap tool stores have a big variety of the low cost needle file sets. They don't last long. But the worn files being basic carbon steel would make for a nice compatible hard surface filler when used in this way.

                          Thoughts?
                          Chilliwack BC, Canada

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                          • #14
                            Yeah that should work, just be sure to remember to temper it back after welding.

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                            • #15
                              i have not much experience with hardfacing, but they use an intermediate layer with hard facing electrodes for a reason. and anealing and tempering hss? good luck with that. besides, just for this particular application, if the hammer is 1045, you can harden it to any level you wish as is. not much sence in the video imo.

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