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  • A.K. Boomer
    replied
    Originally posted by gellfex View Post

    Well, it's complicated. The short answer is yes, if I'm ruddering on the lee side. I'm also an old whitewater hand and have pretty good reflexes left over. It's an odd rig. I had a long chat with the designers and they said they designed using that type of sail so that as you heel it spills way more wind than a normal sail would so it's actually self correcting. The other weirdness of it is the leeboard system in place of a keel or centerboard. Dunno if you know much sailing theory, but on multi-sail boats you want to trim the sails so that the pressure balances on the keel and you need very little rudder action to steer straight. But on this one you don't trim the sails, you trim the leeboards! By moving them fore and aft you can actually alter course. So sometimes I barely have to rudder.

    That said, I had a close call my last time out. I was on a nice beam reach back to my put-in and decided to troll for stripers. As I cast the rod out the wind gusted and I went wayyyy over to leeward! The spilling sails and those whitewater instincts saved me, it was just like getting your rail caught by an eddyline, and my body heaved way out to windward. Put the fear of God in me alright! I was in a drysuit but it still would have been quite the swim getting it back over and back in.
    Yeah I can see that --- casting is when it's going to happen lol one thing for sure - once you go over your not going to get a typical roll back, the sail will stick to the water like glue lol so yeah your going to get your balls wet... that being said there might actually be some predictablity with it as it takes time to flip im thinking... pretty cool hope you have allot of fun with it... like the little windows so you can see through the blind spot too...

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  • wierdscience
    replied
    Originally posted by Black Forest View Post

    Do you often have to cut really thick material such as in the video? Just curious.
    Yes, and usually repeats of the same part. I have been farming it out to a local shop that has a large oxy/fuel CNC table, but they have a setup fee that applies no matter what size the part is. Small things like this machine will cut get pricey.

    Leave a comment:


  • wierdscience
    replied
    Originally posted by DennisCA View Post
    I don't usually get myself christmas presents, but chance made that I discovered this. A slotting head for a Deckel FP2. This can come in handy for different types of operations, it basically turns the mill into a vertical mini-shaper. Main purpose is slotting for drive keys, but also splines can be made, and other types of operations. Downside is I have to lift off the vertical head to replace it, and that's heavy enough to be a two man job. So I'm gonna have to build a small jib crane that I probably bolt to the floor for the express purpose of moving accessories on and off the mill and workbench.
    That's nice, doesn't look like it's ever been used.

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  • wierdscience
    replied
    Originally posted by true temper View Post
    Do you have a link for this?
    https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B0...?ie=UTF8&psc=1

    I actually paid a bit more back when I bought mine, there are two models of these things, A&B. The B model is 110vac and the A model is 220v.

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  • kj4oll
    replied
    Some change gears for my 1946 Logan, and AR Warner #17 external threading kit, #19 internal threading kit.
    Trying to learn how to thread w/ the lathe.

    Leave a comment:


  • Beazld
    replied
    Some 12-24 set screws, oh wait, wrong thread!

    Leave a comment:


  • true temper
    replied
    Originally posted by wierdscience View Post
    Been wanting a pattern torch for years, but never had the chance at one turning up at auction. Then about a month ago I was strolling through Amazon looking for something else when I spotted this at a stupid cheap price.
    Do you have a link for this?

    Leave a comment:


  • true temper
    replied
    Found a real nice height gauge made in England, I have been wanting one for some time. The same guy had a quick nut for milling machine. Click image for larger version

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  • DennisCA
    replied
    I don't usually get myself christmas presents, but chance made that I discovered this. A slotting head for a Deckel FP2. This can come in handy for different types of operations, it basically turns the mill into a vertical mini-shaper. Main purpose is slotting for drive keys, but also splines can be made, and other types of operations. Downside is I have to lift off the vertical head to replace it, and that's heavy enough to be a two man job. So I'm gonna have to build a small jib crane that I probably bolt to the floor for the express purpose of moving accessories on and off the mill and workbench.





    Leave a comment:


  • NiftyNev
    replied
    I bought a lathe finally.

    https://www.machineryhouse.com.au/l691

    Been sitting at work for a few weeks and got it home yesterday. About A$6K with QCTP and tooling. Need to build a bench now.and clean it. Seems to have come with a bit of gritty stuff mixed with the oil on all the external parts. Hope there's none inside.

    Leave a comment:


  • Black Forest
    replied
    Originally posted by wierdscience View Post

    Pattern cutting torch, you cut out a steel template in the shape you want and mount it on the overarm of the machine. The tracing arm has rotating magnetic stylus that follows the template, the motor being variable speed. Basically it was how it was done before CNC control. It's still the least expensive way in thick steel, with the right tip thicknesses of 3-4 inches can be cut.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RbywJyLCTGI
    Do you often have to cut really thick material such as in the video? Just curious.

    Leave a comment:


  • dian
    replied
    thanks.

    Leave a comment:


  • wierdscience
    replied
    Originally posted by dian View Post

    what does that do?
    Pattern cutting torch, you cut out a steel template in the shape you want and mount it on the overarm of the machine. The tracing arm has rotating magnetic stylus that follows the template, the motor being variable speed. Basically it was how it was done before CNC control. It's still the least expensive way in thick steel, with the right tip thicknesses of 3-4 inches can be cut.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RbywJyLCTGI

    Leave a comment:


  • gellfex
    replied
    Originally posted by Cenedd View Post

    I'm sure you'll find that it's all spelled out in "A study in Bricklaying"

    Bought myself a Mitutoyo Absolute 6" caliper. I had one of the coolant-proof versions previously and use it alternately between my workshop (doing stuff - in theory) and my office (planning stuff - when I'm supposed to be working). It was never in the right place, of course, so now I have an ordinary version for the "clean" space and a coolant-proof version for the ...less than clean place. Hey, it was on sale....it would have been rude not to, right?!
    Tell me, do the newest ones have the zero button recessed or not? Last ones I bought were discontinued 500-136 models because the newer ones they'd recessed the button so you need to use 2 hands to zero it! I use the zeroing function a lot. (not the ABS button) That said, my cheap iGaging is growing on me, the huge display makes up for the annoying timing out.

    Leave a comment:


  • dian
    replied
    Originally posted by wierdscience View Post
    Been wanting a pattern torch for years, but never had the chance at one turning up at auction. Then about a month ago I was strolling through Amazon looking for something else when I spotted this at a stupid cheap price.
    what does that do?

    Leave a comment:

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