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  • Sheet metal slip roller DIY design question.

    Hi Group,

    I have been researching sheet metal slip rollers for a DIY project. The question that I have not been able to figure out is the layout of the rollers. I see 2 different designs and I'm trying to figure out if any one benefits over the other.

    Click image for larger version

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    Design "A" seems to be used by most DIY projects on YouTube and general internet searches. Design "B" is what I see in manufactured tools from simple to powered big machines.
    I'm not considering a 4 roll as the 3 roll fits my needs.

    I can make either one, but I would like others input as to if one performs better than the other and what that difference might be.

    Look forward to any discussion.

    TX
    Mr fixit for the family
    Chris

  • #2
    I suspect B, of which I have Grandpa's, is designed to slide in large sheet material straight from a table on the left.
    Location: Jersey City NJ USA

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    • #3
      Wont one of them leave less of a flat spot at startup?

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      • #4
        There really is no difference other than the orientation of the rolls and like Gellfex mentioned,
        It's it's easier to feed your material straight in rather than at a downward angle.
        So that would mean that you are back roller is the movable one that you use to control your bend.

        JL......

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        • #5
          B is my preferred. Start by inserting material from the left, Adjust both rollers above B to just pinch material for feeding, Raise the third roller to tighten the cone radius
          If a flat spot at start up is a problem start feeding from the opposite side toward yourself. I read that little tip in.an instruction manual.

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          • #6
            Hood half beginnings. Click image for larger version

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            • #7
              B
              If you have long pieces of sheet metal to roll. It’s easier to put them on a table and feed them straight into the rollers.

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              • #8
                B is an initial pinch roll. The metal is pinched between the top and bottom rollers. The side roller is moved inward to tighten the bend. The IP roll will allow bending closer to the end of the material.
                Hemingway sells a kit for a roller based on a George H Thompson design.

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                • #9
                  I have the 3 in 1 sheet metal machine. I find it clumsy at best, and I don't like how the rollers work. There is no such thing as a feed table, unless you want to add something that you can bang your head on when using the shear or folding function. Aside from that, once you have the sheet material between the rollers, the bend radius adjustments are on the side away from the feed. This is awkward. In any event, I would prefer to have a feed table, and have the material remain flat on that as the rest of the material is bent into the curve. In this regard, B seems like the better method. The drawing at B shows the upper roller directly above the bottom roller- I get this is just a hand drawing, but I think that top roller should be slightly to the right of the bottom roller, but not as far 'back' as shown at A. The axis of the third roller should pivot around the axis of the bottom roller so all the gearing stays well engaged, and the adjustment for the third roller should be via one control, not one control for each end of it.
                  I seldom do anything within the scope of logical reason and calculated cost/benefit, etc- I'm following my passion-

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                  • #10
                    There's a separate adjustment for each side of the forming roll so that cones can be rolled in addition to rings or cylinders.

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                    • #11
                      Fair enough. Keep the separate adjustability, but still operate with one lever.
                      I seldom do anything within the scope of logical reason and calculated cost/benefit, etc- I'm following my passion-

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                      • #12
                        I have been planning on building a powered slip roller but a vertical version where gravity is a friend. Have it set up like a panel saw. Less foot print.

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                        • #13
                          Originally posted by Ironbearmarine View Post
                          I have been planning on building a powered slip roller but a vertical version where gravity is a friend. Have it set up like a panel saw. Less foot print.
                          That's an interesting idea, would like to see how it turns out.

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                          • #14
                            A is a pyramid roller, B is a pinch roll. B has a few advantages - you get almost no flat spot, especially if you rotate the work 180 degrees each time you feed it. The other thing with B is you drop the pinch roller out of the way and by squeezing the work between the other two, you can flatten a piece of sheet that might have a dings or warps in it. That be very handy and the pinch roller can't do it.

                            Here's one I made, 24", with enough shots to cover its design. It roughly following plans in Model Engineers Workshop from probably a few decades ago, but made it a little heavier. It uses the handle off the mill as a crank. An extremely low duty cycle, but its there under the bench when needed









                            Last edited by Mcgyver; 01-03-2021, 06:39 AM.
                            in Toronto Ontario - where are you?

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                            • #15
                              Originally posted by DennisCA View Post

                              That's an interesting idea, would like to see how it turns out.
                              I had seen and used a plate roller that was built vertical with the drive in a pit. To roll a 2 inch thick plate Into a cylinder took only one operator with an overhead crane. Once in the roller the load was borne by the floor. Working in a shop that required the regular use of a slip roller, i had often thought how much more efficient a vertical roller would be. My requirements would be for 3/16 inch thick hr steel plate.

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