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  • Pegboard bins?

    The week long, 2021 annual rat killing and shop organizing orgy is about to commence at my place. The focus this year will be to get all 12,928 🤬 various, bags, boxes and packs of misc hardware sorted out and in just TWO locations.

    I just spent a half hour looking for some deck screws I know damn well I had, but couldn't find, until I went and bought more, then came home and found the ones I already had. Or, in other words, why does an idiot bang his head against the wall? Because it feels good when he quits! 😫


    Anybody using these or similar? Looks like 3 or 4 sizes available. I got plenty of wall that needs to be covered with something, may as well be drawers.



    I just need one more tool,just one!

  • #2
    IMO.. Peg board sucks for such things. Pegs get loose etc. Buy the backer plates with the protrusions for the bins and buy quality bins. We have 1000's of these at work, and a good deal less in my shop:

    Wall Mounted Storage Bins in Stock - ULINE

    So.. you don't have to buy the expensive backer plates... 1/8 bar stock and a welder (or even drill) will make for a fine support to hook the boxes onto. Even better, some light angle.

    Good bins aren't expensive and will last "forever".

    Comment


    • #3
      Originally posted by lakeside53 View Post
      IMO.. Peg board sucks for such things. Pegs get loose etc. Buy the backer plates with the protrusions for the bins and buy quality bins. We have 1000's of these at work, and a good deal less in my shop:

      So.. you don't have to buy the expensive backer plates... 1/8 bar stock and a welder (or even drill) will make for a fine support to hook the boxes onto. Even better, some light angle.

      Good bins aren't expensive and will last "forever".
      We have those at work too, not a fan of the small ones, half the time they come off in my hand 😑
      I just need one more tool,just one!

      Comment


      • #4
        I like deep bins that set on a shelf

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        • #5
          I hate pegboard as well. Highly suggest almost anything else as an option.

          If you opt for the bins that hang on the straps then I agree with the others that the smaller ones tend to flip off if not heavily loaded. Perhaps some manner of spring loaded keepers? No idea but it seems to me like something easy would be a great idea.

          Another option is lots of shelves that are 12" deep and space the shelves to work with Ikea SAMLA series boxes. They are almost clear and they are based on two heights and widths that are multiples of the smallest one. So four smalls fit into the same space as two large. And they are CHEAP! And so far surprisingly sturdy. I've loaded them down pretty heavy in the machine shop and they've survived for more than 5 years so far. Totally oil proof too.

          Lids are sold separately which helps the price point if you don't need them. But even with the lid they are still one of the least expensive options out there. But of course then you need shelves to put them onto. But at least they only need to be on a 12 inch wide shelf for most of the smaller 3 or 4 sizes.

          SAMLA Series - IKEA

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          Chilliwack BC, Canada

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          • #6
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ID:	1919934 I use the wall mount plates for the blue bins. Then use the smaller yellow boxes for nuts, washers etc. In the 12" deep wooden drawers I have full of yellow
            boxes, mostly machine screw sizes. In the yellow boxes you can also get three #5 cardboard screw boxes for tiny items like #6,8,10 washers. Seldom do I go out to a hardware store for fasteners.
            Ron

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            • #7
              I have a little bit pegboard in my shop and in my house (kitchen). It was there when I bought the place and I never bothered to remove it but I find anything with much weight causes it to warp.

              When I needed storage space for nuts and bolts I bought AKRO bins with the wall panels and because drywall sucks in a shop, I installed two 1/2" sheets of plywood on one wall and fastened them to that. I've never once been sorry I bought those bins.

              For a lot of very small stuff I use several organizers very similar to this. Another organizer I like is this style but I find them to be a little too pricey for what I need.
              Location: Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, Canada

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              • #8
                Add me to the "I hate pegboards" list. You lift one bin off, it disengages the one above, which then falls off and dumps its contents on the floor.

                I took some sheets of MDF, made a cabinet with shelves and dividers. Each bin fits in its own cubbyhole, really happy with it.

                Ian
                All of the gear, no idea...

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                • #9
                  I have had to organize many work places and there are three concepts that I like to keep in mind:

                  1. Modularity
                  2. The ability to always be able to EASILY insert a new part or size in between the existing ones.
                  3. Visibility

                  Of course, you also need to keep in mind that things do come in different sizes and a very large one can become a problem if the naturally fits between two or more small ones. So, I also had at least two different areas of storage; one for smaller items and another for large ones.

                  One thing that I used quite a bit for electronic parts were the units with small plastic drawers. They worked well for things like transistors, capacitors (at least small ones), and many, many other small parts that were not too heavy. These drawer boxes provided the modularity and I used shop-made cardboard inserts to go with each part number. If a new part needed to be inserted between two existing ones, I just lifted the cardboard insert with all the parts on it and put it in the next drawer. I deliberately left empty sections in the drawers so I would not have to move the contents of too many bins when making room.

                  Now that my shop is more mechanical than electronic, I like the idea of shelves on vertical rails (standards) with adjustable brackets holding the shelves. On the shelves I use cardboard bins that come in at least two depths (front to back) and many widths. Plastic shelf bins are also available but they cost more and over the years I have found that the cardboard ones will last a long time if not abused. I presently have cardboard bins for many things, like my screw, bolt, nut, and washer stock. Inside the cardboard bins I use both mini-bins and prescription medicine bottles for each individual size of bolt or nut. The mini-bins for larger sizes, like 1/4" and above and the Rx bottles for the smaller sizes. For real small size items, like #0 to #4 screws I use the plastic bead storage boxes that are sold at crafts stores. They come with about 18 small plastic containers with screw on lids in a one inch tall box and everything is made of clear plastic.

                  For labels I have rectangular and round adhesive labels and programs to print them. With the bins, mini-bins, Rx bottles, and bead boxes/containers everything is VISIBLE. That, along with the printed labels, saves a lot of time when I am searching. And everything is modular as well as easily movable to make room for the next size or part that I buy.

                  As for those peg board bins, I do not like them. They waste too much space with the dead volume between the bins. They are difficult to take to a bench or job and then put back. They are completely open so things like sawdust can settle in them when I am doing wood work. And they are not easily dividable so again a lot of space is wasted. I mean, what do you do if you want to store 100 or even 500 #4 x 1/4" screws? That bin would be 99% empty. I have a six inch wide cardboard bin that is labeled #6 and inside it I have about two dozen Rx bottles with different sizes and types of #6 hardware. When it becomes full, I can easily transfer all of them to an eight inch wide cardboard bin and just push the others on that shelf down to make room. The one next to it is only 2" wide and is for the less popular #5 screw size. I have two bins for 1/4-20. Modular!

                  On those Rx bottles, I am 76 yo and have no trouble collecting a lot of them with all my and my wife's prescriptions. I like the ones from Walgreens because it is easy to cut the child proof lock off while retaining the ability to use the cap in either orientation. If you are younger and don't take over a dozen pills a day, you probably have relatives or friends who do. Or you can buy them on the web.



                  Originally posted by true temper View Post
                  I like deep bins that set on a shelf
                  Paul A.
                  SE Texas

                  And if you look REAL close at an analog signal,
                  You will find that it has discrete steps.

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                  • #10
                    I've also seen plastic carrying cases with small square boxes that can be lifted out and they were the perfect height to fit in a standard tool box drawer and maybe roughly two inches square. I was trying to find a pic of them and came across this guy who printed his own in various different sizes and also made his own rolling cabinet for them. I doubt many people would want to take the time and effort he did but I gotta give him credit; he did a nice looking job of it and his cabinet had a couple of well thought out features. He also has plans available.

                    So, just for S&G, here's his website https://www.thingiverse.com/thing:4160638 and here's his video about it. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=CHFK...ature=youtu.be

                    Location: Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, Canada

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      One aspect you might consider too...

                      If you mount pegboard (blech!) or bin rails on a wall then it's not easily moveable when you re-arrange or move house. If you opt to build shelving units that accept some manner of well fitting bin boxes then it can move around or move between shops more easily.

                      I've never worked with bin boxes on the back panel racks but I'm seeing a couple of posts here saying that it's not that hard to bump one and knock it loose when removing another box. That's something that doesn't happen with a nice shelving unit with bin boxes sized to work as a system. Also while pretty sturdy we machinist types tend to load things down with heavy metals. A bin box full of fastener hardware can get darn heavy. Those blue boxes COULD end up heavier than the plastic is able to support over the long haul.

                      Years ago I built some shelf units using regular 16" wide shelving material. To store goodies I came up with a pattern for making cardboard bin boxes from free salvaged cardboard. I'd rough trim the cardboard and stack them with nails as pins in the waste areas and cut them out in stacks of 10 or 12 at a time on my bandsaw. Then I'd fold them over the edge of the bench and hot glue the flaps. At full swing I could do about 30 in an hour. They are sturdy enough that I've still got almost all of them after more than 25 years. Oil or glue spills was the worst reason for tossing a few of them.

                      I'd still be using all the others except for moving more to kitchen style sizes in my new shop. But I've still got 5 of the old style units that I modified for the new place and they still use some of the bins.

                      Best part is that they are free other than some hot glue and a little time.

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                      Chilliwack BC, Canada

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                      • #12
                        For your larger bin needs maybe something like these :

                        Order Online>> https://www.repurposedmaterialsinc.c...vator-buckets/
                        These nylon Grain Elevator Buckets were paired with a mechanism for hauling flowable bulk materials (most often grain or fertilizer) vertically. How would you "repurpose" them?

                        Dimensions: 14" x 7"Color: Grey, Weight: 29 lbs each Condition: Unused Price: $175.00 Per Box of 9 Buckets

                        Location: Dallas Warehouse Shipping: FREE SHIPPING

                        Shipping Method: LTL or Pick Up


                        Steve

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                        • #13
                          Originally posted by doctor demo View Post
                          For your larger bin needs maybe something like these :

                          Order Online>> https://www.repurposedmaterialsinc.c...vator-buckets/
                          These nylon Grain Elevator Buckets were paired with a mechanism for hauling flowable bulk materials (most often grain or fertilizer) vertically. How would you "repurpose" them?

                          Dimensions: 14" x 7"Color: Grey, Weight: 29 lbs each Condition: Unused Price: $175.00 Per Box of 9 Buckets

                          Location: Dallas Warehouse Shipping: FREE SHIPPING

                          Shipping Method: LTL or Pick Up


                          Steve

                          Repurposing them is easy, simply bolt them to a sheet of plywood. I knew a guy who said he could get for free a large number of old steel buckets from his friend who got them from a decommissioned grain elevator. I told him to get them and make himself a large bolt/commodity bin collection using a couple of pieces of plywood in an A-frame configuration and mounted on some heavy duty casters which I had offered to him for free. He could have definitely have used them but apparently it wasn't a "fun job" for him so he never bothered. What a dumbass!
                          Last edited by Arcane; 01-04-2021, 09:05 PM. Reason: Misread the part about being unused.
                          Location: Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, Canada

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                          • #14
                            That is a good idea though, and plenty cheap for the small ones-

                            https://www.certifiedmtp.com/seedbur...evator-bucket/ $2.98

                            https://www.certifiedmtp.com/seedbur...evator-bucket/ $2.99
                            I just need one more tool,just one!

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Pegboard is perfect! Every time I try to pull a screwdriver from my pegboard holders, it detaches, and the wire holder disappears between the wall and the back of the bench. I bet there are a dozen of those back there if I ever crawl under and look. The holes are getting wallowed out too.

                              A replacement storage system will definitely not include pegboard.
                              S E Michigan

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