Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

4 1/2 inch corded circular saw.

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • #16
    Originally posted by gellfex View Post

    I'm not entirely following the attraction of a smaller saw vs a 7.25". Just weight? I feel the size of the larger saw would consistently give me a cleaner cut. But if someone gave me a Festool track saw I'd not turn up my nose.
    Maybe if you used one on a small job you would understand the attraction. It's like using a 1/4" drive socket tool on small (5/16" and smaller) fasteners vs. using a 1/2" drive socket tool on the same small fasteners. Both work, but one seems more suited for the job.

    Mike

    Comment


    • #17
      Originally posted by MikeL46 View Post

      Maybe if you used one on a small job you would understand the attraction. It's like using a 1/4" drive socket tool on small (5/16" and smaller) fasteners vs. using a 1/2" drive socket tool on the same small fasteners. Both work, but one seems more suited for the job.

      Mike
      So assuming you have a miter saw on site, and all plywood should be cut with a four or five inch saw, then what is the right job for the 7.25 other than trimming a door?
      Location: Jersey City NJ USA

      Comment


      • #18
        Originally posted by boats View Post

        Are these small saws any good ? Likely they are all made in the same Chinese factory. Brand recommendations appreciated.
        Boats
        Hey Boats.. I have a couple of these Dremel Ultra saws. I like them. They are powerful enough and well balanced. They got great reviews on amazon.

        And... Made in Mexico, not China JR

        Click image for larger version

Name:	ultra saw.jpg
Views:	158
Size:	4.39 MB
ID:	1920308



        My old yahoo group. Bridgeport Mill Group

        https://groups.yahoo.com/neo/groups/...port_mill/info

        Comment


        • #19
          Originally posted by gellfex View Post

          So assuming you have a miter saw on site, and all plywood should be cut with a four or five inch saw, then what is the right job for the 7.25 other than trimming a door?
          Well, I wouldn't cut any plywood thicker than ~5/16" with the little saw. For sure the Mag 77 is the go to saw for heavy plywood and 2x stock. The little saws are lighter duty and not meant for even mild construction work.

          The light weight is a real plus for light stock and quick jobs. Feels like I can make a simple cut faster than I can get the heavy saw out.

          Mike

          Comment


          • #20
            Originally posted by MikeL46 View Post

            Well, I wouldn't cut any plywood thicker than ~5/16" with the little saw. For sure the Mag 77 is the go to saw for heavy plywood and 2x stock. The little saws are lighter duty and not meant for even mild construction work.

            The light weight is a real plus for light stock and quick jobs. Feels like I can make a simple cut faster than I can get the heavy saw out.

            Mike
            I guess I rarely work with ply thinner than 12mm except as shim stock.
            Location: Jersey City NJ USA

            Comment


            • #21
              Follow up, talked to the trim carpenter that was using the saw. It’s a Rockwell & he has used it everyday since they first came out. Asked him the broken arbor reviews on Amazon. He said only way he could see you can break an arbor is turn the nut wrong way against the shaft lock.

              Goes to show internet reviews can’t be trusted. Site like this knowledge enthusiasts focused only way to go.

              Boats

              Comment


              • #22
                My son has a battery-powered saw about that size. You can use it with one hand all day long, and hold a speed square with the other, to make a fence. For 2x lumber and smaller, it's great.

                Comment


                • #23
                  Originally posted by gellfex View Post
                  Re: the right/left thing, if you're cutting, say a 1x10 using a speed square, you hold the square with your left hand, and the saw has the majority of it's plate on the side of the board that is not going to drop away. With the blade on the left side it's easy to lose control of the tool at the end of the cut. Placing your guide is the trick, I have a marking block the width from the left side of the blade to the edge of the plate.

                  I'm not entirely following the attraction of a smaller saw vs a 7.25". Just weight? I feel the size of the larger saw would consistently give me a cleaner cut. But if someone gave me a Festool track saw I'd not turn up my nose.
                  Ever have a chronic case of tendinitis? Lifting a bigger saw causes severe pain. My small Skil saw doesn't do that.
                  Btw, IMO, any small saw has to have the ability to easily clear 2x material on the flat.

                  Comment


                  • #24
                    About 12 years ago I bought a 7-1/4" worm drive Skill saw. Love that saw but dang it's heavy!

                    Fast forward 2 years and I went looking for a 5-1/2" trim saw. Found a Porter Cable at Lowes. I can't remember exactly how much they wanted for it, in the $400 range I think. Anyway nice little saw but I choked at the price. Went to Sears and found a Craftsman that looked and felt exactly like the Porter Cable for $135. It has been my go to circle saw for 10 years now.

                    Tim

                    Comment


                    • #25
                      Got a Dewalt 18 volt 5 1/2" saw, love it. Blades on the left, saw in right hand , speedsquare in left, waste to right, nice, quick and easy. Make two pencil marks an inch apart, right is cut, left is speedsquare, and it splits the cut mark. Blades are hard to find, though.

                      ,

                      Comment


                      • #26
                        I had a Skil saw- was the best portable saw I ever had. When it came back to me burnt out ( stupid me lent it out) I replaced it with a SawCat. That has been a good saw, but it's heavy. This one is a machine tool- the Skil was like an extension of my arm. I liked the Porter Cable trim saw for its compactness and precision, but it was a bit heavy too.

                        Maybe I'll look for something to replace the trim saw- a Makita perhaps, if the battery is compatible with my drills and chargers.
                        I seldom do anything within the scope of logical reason and calculated cost/benefit, etc- I'm following my passion-

                        Comment

                        Working...
                        X