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  • #31
    To ensure the babit would stick to the pipe I would use a combination of shallow grooves and some holes. That way there would be something to anchor to. That is what I think but again, I might be wrong
    Helder Ferreira
    Setubal, Portugal

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    • #32
      Originally posted by gambler View Post
      this is not a job for a machinist, its a job for a good parts man. a bushing close in size to that can easily be found and honed to fit. easily grooved, even crudely, will allow enough lube to allow it to live.
      regarding the video, I've found after many years doing that job if you want it to last you need to change the yoke, and rebalance the shaft.
      You're right and if an exact fit can't be had, I'd be looking for any bushing that has the right ID. You can always make a sleeve to make up the difference on the OD.
      Location: Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, Canada

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      • #33
        Originally posted by Noitoen View Post
        To ensure the babit would stick to the pipe I would use a combination of shallow grooves and some holes. That way there would be something to anchor to. That is what I think but again, I might be wrong
        I explianded that way back already... apparently skipped over or forgotten. ..by now..

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        • #34
          Originally posted by Arcane View Post

          You're right and if an exact fit can't be had, I'd be looking for any bushing that has the right ID. You can always make a sleeve to make up the difference on the OD.
          Originally posted by Arcane View Post

          You're right and if an exact fit can't be had, I'd be looking for any bushing that has the right ID. You can always make a sleeve to make up the difference on the OD.
          Did you even look at the pic ? It's like 3 mm or so thick, that is the both materials. ....? Sleeve what ?

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          • #35
            Originally posted by 754 View Post



            Did you even look at the pic ? It's like 3 mm or so thick, that is the both materials. ....? Sleeve what ?
            Sorry, I just don't have the calibrated eyeballs you have.
            Location: Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, Canada

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            • #36
              Originally posted by plunger View Post

              I believe this is going to be true. How does white metal machine though .?I would think the simplest way of doing this is to machine a cylinder with the OD perfect for the housing. If one used a dummy shaft about a mm smaller than the finish ID then if it was clocked up and bored would this not be the simplest way to do it. .................
              The usual deal is indeed to have a piece held down the middle that is a little smaller than the desired bore. Then the ID is bored, and the bearing separated and scraped. If non-critical, or adjusted by shims, a full size piece may be used and the bore is good as-is, or with just a little scraping.

              This is one-piece, as I understand it, so it would have to be bored as if you were boring a close fit bushing, and then maybe scraped if the shaft does not go in smoothly.

              Does that "liner" come out? Might be easier to do with it out, as long as the fit does not distort it. If it is removable, it probably is OK that way, it would be a replaceable part.

              As thin as it appears, it would probably be a real pain to pour it, very hard to get a full coverage. How thick IS the "white metal" part of it, and how thick is the "liner/backing"? Must be reasonably thick to have oil grooves in it.

              Apparently some aircraft engine bearing shells are only a few thou thick as to the white metal coating, over a copper or bronze backing in a steel shell. Almost a "plated" thickness.
              2801 3147 6749 8779 4900 4900 4900

              Keep eye on ball.
              Hashim Khan


              It's just a box of rain, I don't know who put it there.

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              • #37
                Originally posted by 754 View Post



                Did you even look at the pic ? It's like 3 mm or so thick, that is the both materials. ....? Sleeve what ?
                no its not
                san jose, ca. usa

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                • #38
                  To perpetuate arguing, the part is the die cast aluminum tail shaft housing for a car/truck driveshaft yoke to slide into. It bolts on the back of the transmission or transfer case if it's 4Wd whereas there will be two of them. The yoke rides on the (sorry Doozer automotive has been using DU for this for forty years) Delrin Urethane bushing that is pressed into it. The OP will get the measurements and search for one of these and press it in for a happy ending to his woes.

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                  • #39
                    Plunger, you keep asking about machining and pressing the white metal into the housing. If you could find a piece big enough to machine I think you'll find that it's so soft that it will distort during the machining.

                    Have you been able to hold one of the old failed sleeves in your hand and see what it is made from? If it in fact does have an inner facing of white metal then it's pretty likely that it is layered onto a copper, brass or steel outer foundation sleeve.

                    And while I have not run across sleeves like this often when I did more often than not the sleeve was made from some alloy of steel. Perhaps leaded steel? After all with the strong oil film provided by all that surface area metal to metal contact will be seldom and very light.
                    Chilliwack BC, Canada

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                    • #40
                      One thing I noticed in the picture of the housing. The bushing has a notch in it which is supposed to be lined up with the drain back passage in the housing. It appears as though it is not properly lined up thus blocking the proper oil flow through the bushing and back into the housing.
                      Larry - west coast of Canada

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                      • #41
                        Originally posted by plunger View Post
                        A piece of oilite costs $255.This is for a piece 165mm long, the minimum length they will cut. Pb1 bronse is about $26 for a 100mm long piece . If pb would work I would think its the easiest way of doing this. Could it not just be machined to size ,ID and OD , crossdrilled and the grooves hand ground out .? Then just banged into the housing or is pb not up to this job .?

                        I wonder if it could be possible to machine a piece of steel to correct OD and just fill the tube up with babbit and machine the ID in a lathe and then do the grooves afterwards.
                        How would one tin the babbit to the outer steel tube. ? Is there a special flux to do this or does babbit stick like sh1t?
                        I would use the bronze and press it in with loctite. This is a fairly common technique on older jeeps, I have heard of a few guys doing it this way -- they buy a short piece of bar, machine the OD and press it in. Then machine the ID.

                        For soldering on steel, there is a product I like called "tinning butter" which is basically pure tin in a flux paste. It was very common years ago for auto body sheet metal work, before plastic and epoxy were common.

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                        • #42
                          There were two companies that I used when I was in the transmission business.
                          1) dura-bond bearing co.
                          2)omega machine and tool co.
                          Both companies should have distribution through automatic transmission parts distributors throughout the world.
                          Hope this helps.
                          phil
                          Dura-Bond Transmission Bushings and Kits are constructed of seamless steel tube with a thin layer of babbitt material, making installation easy.

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                          • #43
                            You could also insulate the outside of the bushing and try some home electroplating on the inside. It could work.
                            Helder Ferreira
                            Setubal, Portugal

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                            • #44
                              Hi, I am new here and am the guy plunger has been helping in my quest to make a new bush for my 4x4's transfer case.

                              I have written up a thread on this which can be found here: https://www.4x4community.co.za/forum...or-restoration

                              I will read through the above info in detail and see what I can learn from this valuable information. Thanks for all whom has posted to date. A lot of valuable info to work through!

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                              • #45
                                Originally posted by mygoggie View Post
                                Hi, I am new here and am the guy plunger has been helping in my quest to make a new bush for my 4x4's transfer case.

                                I have written up a thread on this which can be found here: https://www.4x4community.co.za/forum...or-restoration

                                I will read through the above info in detail and see what I can learn from this valuable information. Thanks for all whom has posted to date. A lot of valuable info to work through!
                                Thanks. Nice write-up and pictures of the process!
                                Location: Helsinki, Finland, Europe

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