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Import 6 Jaw

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  • Bob La Londe
    replied
    Originally posted by old mart View Post
    https://inverterdrive.com/group/AC-I...080-EC-Vector/
    I wonder if this VFD is the same as yours, there are some very good installation guides on this site as printable pdf's.
    I have the manuals for all my inverters except the Deltas on the little 400hz 24K milling machines. I actually have the originals for all of them My biggest issue was learning what some of the functions meant when I was starting out and didn't have a clue. The manuals all assume you have some familiarity. I even have the original manual for that antique 120hz max Mitsubishi.

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  • old mart
    replied
    https://inverterdrive.com/group/AC-I...080-EC-Vector/
    I wonder if this VFD is the same as yours, there are some very good installation guides on this site as printable pdf's.

    Leave a comment:


  • Bob La Londe
    replied
    Originally posted by old mart View Post
    What is the make and model of the VFD you have spare, Bob?
    Its not for sale. LOL. Its actually a 4Kw 400hz Huan Yang (a real Huan Yang) dogeared to replace another older Mitsubishi 3.7Kw VFD that will only do 120hz on a 5hp variable speed machine someday if I ever get around to running at upto 200hz.

    BLINK! It just occurred to me that the Mitsubishi VFD would be perfect on the lathe if I decide to put a 3 phase motor on it. Maybe I'll get around to that VFD swap sooner rather than later.

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  • old mart
    replied
    What is the make and model of the VFD you have spare, Bob?

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  • thin-woodsman
    replied
    This was a 6" Sanou. The backplate that came with it neaded a bit of work, I have a Logan with a threaded spindle and the register for the chuck was off by about ten thou - and that is after trimming the end so the threads would even engage. Got it down to where the needle didn't move on a .001" indicator though. Mounted the chuck, put my usual 1/2" dowel pin in and indicated off that, there was under a thou (roughly .00075) runout and I didn't attempt to improve that by re-seating the dowel pin or anything. Pretty confident I could get it down to .0005 with careful attention, maybe less.

    Seems to be a good chuck.

    One small detail people should be aware of: there seems to be a minimum clamping size of slightly (1/32"?) under 3/8" face-to-face hexagonal. Replacement jaws would clearly address this, so hardly a deal killer. Speaking of replacement jaws, I tried to remove the outer half of one and couldn't get it off once the bolts were out - it wiggled a bit under a brass hammer, but did not come free. Not sure if the jaws have to be removed from the chuck completely in order to take them apart, or if this just needs some penetrating oil. Gave it a dose of Kroil and called it a night.
    Last edited by thin-woodsman; 02-06-2021, 09:34 PM.

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  • Bob La Londe
    replied
    Originally posted by old mart View Post
    Its nice to know that the chuck is a good one, best keep it for delicate work and thinwall tubes.
    I'm not sure I will do that. Maybe down the road I might consider it. For now I'm just going to use it. I did notice I have single phase flutter in the lathe. My next thing may be to swap out the single phase motor for a 3 phase with a VFD or a phase converter. (I have the VFD)

    Originally posted by thin-woodsman View Post
    Thanks for the heads-up on the import 6-jaw - when I looked a year ago, all the ones I could find were those awkward slope-jaw ones. Picked up one of the two-piece jaw models and it arrived this morning. Looks decent, we'll see how it measures...
    The one I picked up is set tru, and I spent some time dialing it in.

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  • thin-woodsman
    replied
    Thanks for the heads-up on the import 6-jaw - when I looked a year ago, all the ones I could find were those awkward slope-jaw ones. Picked up one of the two-piece jaw models and it arrived this morning. Looks decent, we'll see how it measures...

    Leave a comment:


  • old mart
    replied
    Its nice to know that the chuck is a good one, best keep it for delicate work and thinwall tubes.

    Leave a comment:


  • Bob La Londe
    replied
    After using the Shars 6 jaw chuck a little bit, I have to say a I really like it. The only thing I find a little annoying is the single place to use the chuck key. Its no big deal in middle range speeds (300 and up), but in low gear it takes a little muscle to turn the chuck by hand.

    And I am reminded I hate stubby chuck keys with safety springs. Fortunately the chuck key for the Bison 4 jaw is the same size.
    Last edited by Bob La Londe; 02-06-2021, 11:42 AM.

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  • old mart
    replied
    We have collets which fit in the nose of the Smart & Brown model A spindle and also some stepped closing and opening collets which are bigger, intended to hold discs or rings. Doozers illustration shows the type which is closed by the taper on the dark part. The inside of the collet nose has a series of steps of 1/4" different diameters. Several of these collets are required having the increments overlapping much smaller than 1/4", as the clamping range is only about 1/16", The external type require a tapered opener to expand them.
    I had not heard of them being called pot chucks, S & B calls them stepped collets. Unmachined ones can be bored or turned for custom jobs.

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  • Doozer
    replied
    Originally posted by Bob La Londe View Post
    I found a reference to a pot chuck on Instructables of all places. Its just a split busing to hold parts that don't match up to the chuck jaws according to that page: https://www.instructables.com/How-to...0.5%22%20stock.

    I've been doing that for years. I just never heard the term pot chuck before. I always just called it a split bushing. They are good for holding things like lead screws to indicate them in and machine the ends too.
    A split bushing is NOT a pot chuck.
    Think of an oversize collet.
    Hardinge had them in 5C variants, up to 5", maybe 6".
    It is not just the taper of the collet that closes them.
    You need the external closer rings for whatever size you are using.
    It has a large internal taper to close the jaws, just like the 5C native taper.
    A 3 jaw chuck with pie jaws is close to what a pot chuck is.
    But it is NOT a split bushing.

    -Doozer

    Last edited by Doozer; 02-05-2021, 09:57 PM.

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  • Bob La Londe
    replied
    After using the chuck a little bit, I have to say a I really like it. The only thing I find a little annoying is the single place to use the chuck key. Its no big deal in middle range speeds (300 and up), but in low gear it takes a little muscle to turn the chuck by hand.

    Leave a comment:


  • Bob La Londe
    replied
    Well, the new 6 jaw finally got installed yesterday. As I mentioned I went with the more expensive one from Shars along with a D1-5 back plate for a set tru style chuck. The back plate wasn't horrible to begin with. It was 5-7 thou out of perpendicular depending on where I indicated it. I turned off a little more than because I was being particular. Then I turned down the central boss. Probably should have done that first, but it doesn't matter. that much. The chuck mates to the plate on a ring about an inch wide around the perimeter. I make things that way with an outer mating ring (jacks tools holders etc) so I understand the rationale. I gently snugged the screws, rough centered the chuck with a ground pin, and then torqued all the bolts to 10lb, and reindicated it. I was able to get about 3 tenths. Then I torqued all the bolts to 45lbs (cross pattern) and it stayed about 3 tenths with the pin. I turn a lot of 3/4 stock for a particular job, so I used a 3/4 pin. I did not indicate other sizes, but I chucked up a couple and spun them up to speed. I can't see the runout I could see on the old 3 jaw. (3 thou is visible if you look at the edge of the part and tune out the rest.) I'll check it at other sizes eventually, but so far I am ok with it.

    The 6 jaw body is about 1/4 inch longer then the 3 jaw it is replacing. It remains to be seen if that is an issue.

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  • Bob La Londe
    replied
    I found a reference to a pot chuck on Instructables of all places. Its just a split busing to hold parts that don't match up to the chuck jaws according to that page: https://www.instructables.com/How-to...0.5%22%20stock.

    I've been doing that for years. I just never heard the term pot chuck before. I always just called it a split bushing. They are good for holding things like lead screws to indicate them in and machine the ends too.

    Leave a comment:


  • old mart
    replied
    I've heard the term "pot chuck", but hopefully Doozer can explain fully to us in due course.

    NSF, the chuck is indeed $228, but the extra $159 shipping to the UK and the likely additional duty, taxes and the service charge made by the delivery company tend to put me off.

    Bob, that chuck looks delicious, I should "pot" it before it flys away.

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