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Atlas shaper vise value?

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  • #46
    Jerry, Its a Rhodes 7 inch Shaper made in the 1930's
    I believe Rhodes is the only shaper that also had a Slotting Head Attachment
    Unfortunately that was lost in an accident by the previous owner --wish I had it !
    You can see a Rhodes Slotter in this 1 minute video someone posted on Youtube

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=uvzRG7PO9oA

    I guess you could call this a 3 axis Shaper 😀😀😀
    Rich
    Edit
    The Ram was removed and a 90 degree knee was installed in the Ram ways, and the ram was remounted in the 90 degree knee to give vertical action
    As i recall , the stroke was about half of the horizontal stroke (7" max)
    Last edited by Rich Carlstedt; 01-10-2021, 09:33 PM.
    Green Bay, WI

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    • #47
      Originally posted by 754 View Post
      I get a feeling someone on here is constantly comparing late model production equipment to home hobby equipment..
      makes you wonder what they have at home or are just using their employers equipment.
      Bented has said he doesn't have any equipment of his own. He's said he is fascinated observing how those who do, do so, along with a dash of scorn. Seems an odd hobby, each to their own I guess.
      in Toronto Ontario - where are you?

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      • #48
        That was quite a slotting setup.... tiltable ram and all.

        Was the whole works lost, or do you have the rotary table at least?
        2801 3147 6749 8779 4900 4900 4900

        Keep eye on ball.
        Hashim Khan


        It's just a box of rain, I don't know who put it there.

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        • #49
          I have the Rhodes Rotary table . Yes, the Ram could be tilted as well..forgot that part.
          The Slotting attachment was accidentally placed near the scrap iron when the shop was cleaned out, and the scrap Iron guy took it .
          The next day it was noted as missing ( Too much going on I guess) when the Shaper was being moved, but it was too late as the iron was dumped at the scrap yard..or so I was told.
          The slotting head is really rare and is worth more than the Shaper itself as I understand ..similar to the vice issue
          Rich

          The Rotary Table is a very low profile RT and has a dividing head attachment with a unusual locking mechanism show here
          Click image for larger version  Name:	P6020038.JPG Views:	0 Size:	654.1 KB ID:	1921357 Click image for larger version  Name:	P6020039.JPG Views:	0 Size:	668.2 KB ID:	1921356
          Last edited by Rich Carlstedt; 01-11-2021, 02:50 PM.
          Green Bay, WI

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          • #50
            Rich, thanks for the added pictures and explanation.

            The swiveling jaw would have both advantages and disadvantages. Or perhaps better to say that the swiveling jaw would require an extra step on occasion. Parts in the middle would be fine of course. And I'm sure that 98% of the time that's what you do. But there's those other times where we might want to clamp a part at one end for some reason. And on a swiveling style like this that means some manner of same size packing is needed for the other end of the jaws. A small matter really. And likely good practice even on vises with regular sliding ways.




            Chilliwack BC, Canada

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            • #51
              Speaking of multi use machines. I once saw a ship's lathe, had a shaper on left end, not sure about slotter. It could also mill and drill I believe.
              I think there are a few brands, and maybe a good quality Euro hobby version sort of like those pricey ones.,
              Last edited by 754; 01-11-2021, 03:45 PM.

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              • #52
                Originally posted by BCRider View Post
                Rich, thanks for the added pictures and explanation.

                The swiveling jaw would have both advantages and disadvantages. Or perhaps better to say that the swiveling jaw would require an extra step on occasion. Parts in the middle would be fine of course. And I'm sure that 98% of the time that's what you do. But there's those other times where we might want to clamp a part at one end for some reason. And on a swiveling style like this that means some manner of same size packing is needed for the other end of the jaws. A small matter really. And likely good practice even on vises with regular sliding ways.
                Even if the jaw is not made to swivel (or has a pin, as many do, to hold it in the middle), it is definitely not advisable to clamp it over to one end, as even with the best of vises, the jaws will shift a little, and the work will be held by just the two edges nearest to the center of the jaws.

                I do not care what vise you have, that happens. And, if you only want a light grip, that may be "leaky" (defective) as a technique, but it might work.... If you need a good grip, you need to do what you call "packing" at the other end of the jaw. A full-threaded bolt, and a long threaded nut is handy for that (actually a few sizes of them) as it can be adjusted to the spacing that just brings the jaw parallel with the work, for maximum grip. (or just put it in the middle)
                2801 3147 6749 8779 4900 4900 4900

                Keep eye on ball.
                Hashim Khan


                It's just a box of rain, I don't know who put it there.

                Comment


                • #53
                  Originally posted by J Tiers View Post

                  Even if the jaw is not made to swivel (or has a pin, as many do, to hold it in the middle), it is definitely not advisable to clamp it over to one end, as even with the best of vises, the jaws will shift a little, and the work will be held by just the two edges nearest to the center of the jaws. I do not care what vise you have, that happens. And, if you only want a light grip, that may be "leaky" (defective) as a technique, but it might work.... If you need a good grip, you need to do what you call "packing" at the other end of the jaw. A full-threaded bolt, and a long threaded nut is handy for that (actually a few sizes of them) as it can be adjusted to the spacing that just brings the jaw parallel with the work, for maximum grip. (or just put it in the middle)
                  Exactly !
                  In my case, I use a Machinists Jack at the opposite end . Finger tight on the work piece and screw out the jack with my other hand and when it touches,i torque the jaws and then tighten the clamp nut which really locks it in
                  Rich
                  Green Bay, WI

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                  • #54
                    Yes, that would be by far the better method. And I do it that way MOST of the time. Actually I don't recall not using opposing packing on the milling vise. But now and then I'll grab something on one side with the drill press vise. It's not pretty but typically it's a round piece being held vertically. I still feel bad though. It's certainly vise abuse. And my faithful drill press vise has been a real trooper for me since the mid 1980's. It's almost milling machine grade in terms of jaw slop.

                    For times in the mill vise where even a small machinist's jack won't fit I've used a lump of whatever along with some shims to match the dimension. I wonder about the idea of a small "machinist's toe jack which could work with smaller spacings. It would be slick if it worked down to 1/8" / 3mm or so and up to around an inch. Or I see a lot of mill vises with threaded holes on the sides to use with stops. Something that screwed into that hole and then could be adjusted to hold back the movable jaw?

                    I've suddenly got this other little micro machinist's jack to use in the vise or on the table. Let me play in CAD and I'll be back....
                    Chilliwack BC, Canada

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