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Stud welder ID / help

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  • Stud welder ID / help

    I bought this stud welder for 15 bucks hoping I might be able make a spot welder. Anyone know about it or heard of it? The company seems to have gone away and I couldn't find information on it.
    Perhaps, if it can't spot weld, there are parts worth removing before scrapping? Click image for larger version

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  • #2
    I remember seeing that brand advertised in some body shop tool catalog that I picked up at my local store. That was quite a few years ago.
    Don't know what happened to them. If I were to take a guess I would say that the bulk of the thing was probably the main issue. The stud welders that I've seen were about the size of a large hand drill.
    Pulling dents out of body panels is a thing of the past. It's replace now.

    JL..................
    Last edited by JoeLee; 01-10-2021, 10:47 AM.

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    • #3
      Originally posted by JoeLee View Post
      I remember seeing that brand advertised in some body shop tool catalog that I picked up at my local store. That was quite a few years ago.
      Don't know what happened to them. If I were to take a guess I would say that the bulk of the thing was probably the main issue. The stud welders that I've seen were about the size of a large hand drill.
      Pulling dents out of body panels is a thing of the past. It's replace now.

      JL..................
      This isn't for welding those types of studs used in body shops. Those stud welders, as you say are much smaller. I believe this type is used for welding studs into chassis and metal cabinets. MUCH more heavy duty.

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      • #4
        At 120 VAC 20A input I would say it's primary target is the body shop industry. The gun plugs into the unit which is usually mounted on a cart much like the one shown in this Ebay ad below.
        Maybe sell it to this guy. His one model up is worth almost $900 to him. For $15 you did good!

        https://www.ebay.com/c/1422606325
        Home, down in the valley behind the Red Angus
        Bad Decisions Make Good Stories​

        Location: British Columbia

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        • #5
          Originally posted by challenger View Post

          This isn't for welding those types of studs used in body shops. Those stud welders, as you say are much smaller. I believe this type is used for welding studs into chassis and metal cabinets. MUCH more heavy duty.
          OK, not sure of the difference between the two. The studs used in the auto body spot welders a like small nails..... basically.
          Not sure what type of studs your referring to look like. there are many.

          I remember that most body shops had both a stud welder and a slide hammer to pull the studs. By the time they were done sticking studs to the dented panel it ended up looking like a porcupine. When they pulled the dent the studs were snipped off and the remaining heads ground off. With the thickness of todays body panels you could easily grind right through in grinding the stud heads off.

          The spot welders looked similar to what you pictured, with two leads that have copper tips. One lead had the trigger, put one lead on either side of the panel as close as you could line te\he two studs up and hit the trigger. Lining the two contact tips up inside and out was the tricky part.

          JL.................
          Last edited by JoeLee; 01-10-2021, 12:15 PM.

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          • #6
            To me that looks like a "true" stud welder as opposed to the hand held body shop type. I have a 120V stud welder that's about the same size as yours (judging by the 5 gallon pail in the first pic). What I don't see on yours are the cable plugins, grounding cable and the one for the gun. The plugins on mine are the plug and turn type like on my newer welder.

            If you're near a largish city you might call around to find somebody in the stud welding business, they may want to buy yours. I'm guessing it would be fairly expensive to equip yours with a gun, stud collets and cables.

            Mine was purchased used for $300 including a number of collets and at least 30 pounds of assorted studs. It's worked fine, a friend who was sales person for Nelson Stud Welding tells me if anything ever does go wrong they're easy to fix.

            This reminds me, I have a heavy machine stand with open base. I've been meaning to enclose the stand by welding studs to the legs and bolting the enclosure sides around it. I could do the same by drilling/tapping the legs, stud welding on all four legs is faster than drilling/tapping a single hole in the 3/16" wall legs.
            Last edited by DR; 01-10-2021, 02:53 PM.

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            • #7
              Originally posted by DR View Post
              To me that looks like a "true" stud welder as opposed to the hand held body shop type. I have a 120V stud welder that's about the same size as yours (judging by the 5 gallon pail in the first pic). What I don't see on yours are the cable plugins, grounding cable and the one for the gun. The plugins on mine are the plug and turn type like on my newer welder.

              If you're near a largish city you might call around to find somebody in the stud welding business, they may want to buy yours. I'm guessing it would be fairly expensive to equip yours with a gun, stud collets and cables.

              Mine was purchased used for $300 including a number of collets and at least 30 pounds of assorted studs. It's worked fine, a friend who was sales person for Nelson Stud Welding tells if anything ever does go wrong they're easy to fix.

              This reminds me, I have a heavy machine stand with open base. I've been meaning to enclose the stand by welding studs to the legs and bolting the enclosure sides around it. I could do the same by drilling/tapping the legs, stud welding on all four legs is faster than drilling/tapping a single hole in the 3/16" wall legs.
              This is EXCELLENT information! Thanks.
              I figured, for the $15.00, paid for it that I could somehow equip it with some useful bits and pieces. So far I've not. Hence my inquiry about an alternative use for it.

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