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HF Carbide Grinder Miter Gauge

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  • HF Carbide Grinder Miter Gauge

    Has anyone made or seen a decent miter gauge to replace the terrible one that comes with the HF grinder? I've seen pics of one example that was a sled type. Looking for ideas for something functional but not too nit picky to make. I have a mill, indexer, and rotary table to do the indexing for the degrees, if needed.

    I'm finally finishing the tuneup I started yeas ago. Got the rotor reasonably balanced, tables in good shape, but I need to re-cut the grooves for the miter because they are different widths. Sould be a fun setup but I have an idea

  • #2
    Better miter gauges are often sold by the sellers of wood working equipment. That is where I would look. Prices will range from tens to hundreds of dollars.

    Here is just one:

    https://www.grizzly.com/search?q=miter+gauge

    There are many more.
    Paul A.
    SE Texas

    And if you look REAL close at an analog signal,
    You will find that it has discrete steps.

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    • #3
      As for improving the inexpensive ones that usually come with low cost machines, there are two or three things that I have done.

      1. Add an actually straight edge to the plastic body. Wood can be very good here because it will provide more friction to allow things to be held against it without slipping due to the vibration.

      2. With that vibration in mind, a strip of electrical tape or a similar tape on the plastic will also help prevent slippage. This would allow a metal to be used for the edge or the entire body of the miter gauge.

      3. Often just adding a washer or two under the thumb nut of the adjusting screw will allow tightening it without accidental movement. I do this with other adjustment screws as well - adjustable square heads for one.

      4. Another problem that can sometimes be fixed is slop in the pivot pin. Replace the pin and ream the hole to fit.

      5. In some cases a better pointer can be made for the scale.

      A problem that can be difficult to fix is a poor fit between the slider and the slot in the table. The best fix here usually is a custom made slider. I have to confess that I usually just hold the miter gauge against one side of that table slot. I have not tried it, but I guess shim stock could be added to one side of the existing slider. If you make or modify a slider, minimizing friction should be considered.
      Paul A.
      SE Texas

      And if you look REAL close at an analog signal,
      You will find that it has discrete steps.

      Comment


      • #4
        If the slider is just a little loose, put an even row of dimples with a sharp center punch on the side of the slider. Start out with light taps, then heavier as needed. Note: will not work with the stamped P O S ones.

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        • #5
          Originally posted by Corbettprime View Post
          If the slider is just a little loose, put an even row of dimples with a sharp center punch on the side of the slider. Start out with light taps, then heavier as needed. Note: will not work with the stamped P O S ones.
          I've done that but there is at least 10-15 thousandths to make up and there is more one one side than the other, so it was lipstick on a pig. The issued miter would only go to 45 degrees so was useless for sharpening threading tools. I used a file to extend the slots and then I set it with a fish gage, but that is a PITA. I'd also trued the as cast flat surfaces in the mill to make it marginally usable. Overall it is total crap.

          I will figure out a way to fixture the table on the mill and standardize the slots on each table and then the miter can be fit to the new slot. Looks like the current slots are between .475 and .490, so .500" should be attainable and is a nice round number.

          So far the best example of a miter I've found can be seen in the pics in post #14 in this thread. https://bbs.homeshopmachinist.net/fo...ons#post528900
          I can make that, just seeing if there were other clever implementations that I could leverage.

          Comment


          • #6
            I would be looking for a Delta miter gage. I bought one years ago that was a far better replacement for my Grizzly table saw.

            Here's one pretty reasonable: https://www.amazon.com/Delta-34-929-...21303583&psc=1
            Lynn (Huntsville, AL)

            Comment


            • #7
              Originally posted by lynnl View Post
              I would be looking for a Delta miter gage. I bought one years ago that was a far better replacement for my Grizzly table saw.

              Here's one pretty reasonable: https://www.amazon.com/Delta-34-929-...21303583&psc=1
              Thanks for the suggestion, but I don't need one for a table saw. I need a miter gage for a carbide grinder, the table is the size of a hardback book. The miter in the link is 20" long. A bit big. The one that came with the grinder is about 4.5" long with a guide bar that is about 12mm x 2mm.

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              • #8
                I simply made a longer, closer fitting guide bar. Seems adequate, but a more sophisticated unit might be a worthwhile project. For threading tools I made a special guide which slides on 2 axes, and has a helix angel built in. Clearance angles come from table tilt, of course. I also milled both table slots to match at .485, just as you mentioned.
                Click image for larger version  Name:	t1.jpg Views:	19 Size:	46.0 KB ID:	1921698 Click image for larger version  Name:	t2.jpg Views:	19 Size:	42.4 KB ID:	1921699 Click image for larger version  Name:	t3.jpg Views:	19 Size:	47.5 KB ID:	1921700
                Click image for larger version  Name:	miter.jpg Views:	7 Size:	66.5 KB ID:	1921695
                Last edited by Randy; 01-13-2021, 09:45 PM.

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                • #9
                  I like the knurled nut you added to the stock miter. Now that it will go to 60 degrees the wing nut had to be trimmed quite a bit. That threading tool jig is clever. Thanks.

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                  • #10
                    [QUOTE=Randy;n1921694]I simply made a longer, closer fitting guide bar./QUOTE]

                    Yes Sir. That is the best, IMO to work from to making a "better" one, JR
                    My old yahoo group. Bridgeport Mill Group

                    https://groups.yahoo.com/neo/groups/...port_mill/info

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