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  • So... can I glue this?....

    I'm cleaning up the shop today and needed a short break.

    One of the things I've got sitting by but not yet in the scrap metal bucket is a roughly 8 lb cast iron Record anvil. You know, the cheap ones that are just cast iron and dent and burr up easily from small things being struck on them?

    So I was just about to put the anvil into the scrap metal bucket and started to wonder... I've had a lot of luck with using the Loctite 680 on things. But they were always round shafts into round sockets which are nigh on perfect for these sort of adhesives. But what about the idea of bonding on a 3/8 to 1/2" (10 to 12mm) layer of harder "proper anvil hard" steel to the face? The face in question is 3x5 inches (80x125mm).

    And I suppose the next question is what sort of pre-hardened steel would you suggest?

    Or should I simply dress it up as best I can and gift it on to someone?

    The blue thing's function has been taken over by the 7x10 x 1" slab of mystery steel which whatever it is it's a lot tougher than mild steel by a good amount. So much so that some spots were work hardened and I finally gave up trying to dress the face and got it surface ground at a local shop.
    Chilliwack BC, Canada

  • #2
    Originally posted by BCRider View Post
    I'm cleaning up the shop today and needed a short break.

    One of the things I've got sitting by but not yet in the scrap metal bucket is a roughly 8 lb cast iron Record anvil. You know, the cheap ones that are just cast iron and dent and burr up easily from small things being struck on them?

    So I was just about to put the anvil into the scrap metal bucket and started to wonder... I've had a lot of luck with using the Loctite 680 on things. But they were always round shafts into round sockets which are nigh on perfect for these sort of adhesives. But what about the idea of bonding on a 3/8 to 1/2" (10 to 12mm) layer of harder "proper anvil hard" steel to the face? The face in question is 3x5 inches (80x125mm).

    And I suppose the next question is what sort of pre-hardened steel would you suggest?

    Or should I simply dress it up as best I can and gift it on to someone?

    The blue thing's function has been taken over by the 7x10 x 1" slab of mystery steel which whatever it is it's a lot tougher than mild steel by a good amount. So much so that some spots were work hardened and I finally gave up trying to dress the face and got it surface ground at a local shop.
    Seems like the shock of hits would dislodge the adhesive. JR
    My old yahoo group. Bridgeport Mill Group

    https://groups.yahoo.com/neo/groups/...port_mill/info

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    • #3
      Loctite holds well in shear; not very much in peel. The first time the steel bends (even temporarily) from impact it will come off. Braze it on or forget it.

      Mike

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      • #4
        Originally posted by BCRider View Post


        Or should I simply dress it up as best I can and gift it on to someone?
        Depends. Are you thinking of giving it to a friend, or an enemy? Braze it and use it yourself, or keep it as the boat anchor it is right now. I think I would braze on a hard surface and use it.

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        • #5
          Originally posted by tom_d View Post
          Depends. Are you thinking of giving it to a friend, or an enemy? Braze it and use it yourself, or keep it as the boat anchor it is right now. I think I would braze on a hard surface and use it.
          As a backing for punching out pins in firearms someone would find it perfectly handy. To make it even more suitable for that sort of use I'd even drill a few sizes of holes along one edge for the pins to go into and drop out the underside of the side wings. I use some blocks like this and more recently the ground plate which has some odd holes and "U" notches in the edge for this same job.

          The flexing and lifting from any heavy hitting is a good thought.
          Chilliwack BC, Canada

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          • #6
            i have epoxy glued a hardox 450 plate (that i ground before) on to a 8" chinese wilton vice, with about 1" overhang. it has held up for several years, but i dont do any forging on it. just medium sized hammering.

            btw, if you have cast iron, 680 doesnt work so well, at least that my perception, i havent been able to find any info from henkel on that recently. my vice is cast steel, i believe.

            Comment


            • #7
              Originally posted by dian View Post
              i have epoxy glued a hardox 450 plate (that i ground before) on to a 8" chinese wilton vice, wit my vice is cast steel, i believe.
              Cast Steel, far and few. Very Nice! JR

              My old yahoo group. Bridgeport Mill Group

              https://groups.yahoo.com/neo/groups/...port_mill/info

              Comment


              • #8
                im not sure, but the original anvil didnt look like ci at all. might be a steel plate on a ci body?

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                • #9
                  Take a lot of heat but how about silver solder, mark

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                  • #10
                    Learn cast iron welding using oxy/acy and cast iron rod. The old Linde oxy/acy had a good set of instructions. It s out of print but it is available in digital form on the ESAB web site.

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                    • #11
                      I would think even soft solder would do the job. Brazing around the edges might leave an air gap and allow it to ring like a bell.

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                      • #12
                        An off the wall thought:
                        What if you used 4 steel dowels, welded to the bottom of the steel plate, and pressed or pounded into 4 matching drilled holes in the cast iron anvil, sort of like pilings in a foundation. Welds might have to be from the top of the plate then ground flat so the bottom of the plate was kept as flat as possible, avoiding any voids between the two parts. Loctite the dowels into the holes, and maybe even epoxy the bottom surface to the top of the cast anvil. Press it all together, let it all set up nice and hard, and keep your fingers crossed. At least it would make for some fascinating scrap metal. At best might serve for some mild pounding.
                        S E Michigan

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                        • #13
                          No oxy-acetylene so no way to silver solder something this big. I've got two propane torches is all. At best with both running and at least one part sitting on a heat resistant insulator I might be able to soft solder a plate to the anvil

                          Oakland, the pins idea sounds intriguing. I like how you think! I think I'd do it a little differently though. I'm thinking bond the plate to the anvil THEN drill and pin right through the plate into the anvil using the 680 in the holes to anchor the pins. And I'm thinking a few more than four smaller pins around the edge. Something like 3 rows of 3 each or so

                          Dian, that's good to know about the epoxy. And the use you are putting it to is the same as this "anvil like object" has and would continue to be used for. Just like pins going out and in, the odd smaller bearing tapped lightly into place, perhaps light duty riveting and similar things. Did you use anything all that fancy for the brand or type of epoxy?

                          At least one of the dings in the face of this thing was done when peening a small length of regular nail into a couple of parts as a rivet. It was that divot pushed into the surface about 18 years ago that mostly made me give up on the thing for anything other than some casual use. And my use has been so casual that I'm thinking either "fix" it in some way or just put it into the scrap metal donation bin along with the rest of the offcuts that are too small to do anything with.
                          Last edited by BCRider; 01-19-2021, 02:59 PM.
                          Chilliwack BC, Canada

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                          • #14
                            Old time anvil makers did not have O/A either, and they welded the faces on.......
                            2801 3147 6749 8779 4900 4900 4900

                            Keep eye on ball.
                            Hashim Khan


                            It's just a box of rain, I don't know who put it there.

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                            • #15
                              Light up a nice fire in the fireplace. When it dies down, throw the anvil on the coals. While the anvil is heating up, bring the welding equipment next to the fireplace. When the anvil is warm enough, cover it with hard facing.

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