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1" Bore x 1" Stroke Vertical i.c. Engine

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  • 1" Bore x 1" Stroke Vertical i.c. Engine

    Hi Everyone---Hope your new year is going well, so far. I fell on the ice in my driveway just after Christmas and hurt my back. Between the pain from that, and my arthritis (which is exceptionally bad this year), I've had a very quiet January. Finally, today, out of boredom I sat down at my computer and started importing files from previous engines to see what would be involved in another i.c. engine. I have never built an engine before with a vertically split crank-case, so after looking at some really lovely examples on the forums, I've started putting things together on cad. I enjoy a quiet day designing, and this is what has turned up so far. Nothing really new or exciting here, but I like to see an engine coming together. I have no cnc here, just manual machinery, so that's what my engine will be based on, build-wise.---Brian
    Brian Rupnow
    Design engineer
    Barrie, Ontario, Canada

  • #2
    Brian- sorry to hear that you have not been feeling well. Hope you are on the mends.
    This design looks a little more sexy than past designs!
    One thing I would suggest when making the yellow base is making it in one piece. Drilling, reaming the critical axis, crank and cam first, then sawing the two halves apart.
    I'd do the bolts that hold the halves together too, in one set up.
    Then the non critical clearance interior volumes can be done after.
    This kind of guarantees alignment when your all done.

    Sid

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    • #3
      Thank you Sid. ---I am planning to do the critical bores with the two pieces pre-bolted together. Haven't quite got my head around it yet, but it is a work in progress. Much of what I put up today will probably change as the design progresses.---Brian
      Brian Rupnow
      Design engineer
      Barrie, Ontario, Canada

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      • #4
        For some reason, this kind of reminds me of the CO2 engines that people made way back when. Those had a valve that operated when the piston came to tdc- but no reason the valve couldn't be operated by protrusion on the crankshaft. Just an idea.

        Could be air operated just as easily, although the pressure from CO2 was probably quite a bit higher.
        I seldom do anything within the scope of logical reason and calculated cost/benefit, etc- I'm following my passion-

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        • #5
          Originally posted by darryl View Post
          For some reason, this kind of reminds me of the CO2 engines that people made way back when. Those had a valve that operated when the piston came to tdc- but no reason the valve couldn't be operated by protrusion on the crankshaft. Just an idea.

          Could be air operated just as easily, although the pressure from CO2 was probably quite a bit higher.
          Have not seen one of the engines, but I recall, and may still have, the tank for one that my father had as a kid in the 1930s. The tank is not a pressure tank in any serious way, it is an aluminum cylinder, with a couple of beads rolled into it, and a screw-on flat cap and a flat bottom. A crude overpressure release in the screw-on top. Outlet is just a nib to push some rubber hose over. Clearly not for any significant pressure, nothing more than what is in a 2l bottle of soda, if that much.

          They were operated by putting dry ice in the tank, with the CO2 from the dry ice evaporating ("subliming"). Info on usage directly from him, and obviously he ought to have known.
          2801 3147 6749 8779 4900 4900 4900

          Keep eye on ball.
          Hashim Khan


          It's just a box of rain, I don't know who put it there.

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          • #6
            Brian, good to see you back. I was wondering what happened to you.
            I was going thru withdrawls not seeing your posts.

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            • #7
              I spent this morning sussing out the cylinder head and the valve train. It looks good to me right now, so I'll go eat some lunch and then see if it still pleases me when I come back this afternoon.
              Brian Rupnow
              Design engineer
              Barrie, Ontario, Canada

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              • #8
                Most of the work today was centered around the cylinder head. The carb shown is a Traxxas 4033, and the valves are 1/8" stem diameter with a 3/8" head. The exhaust is identical to what I used on the vertical hit and miss engine last year, and I'm thinking I may pack it with steel wool to see what effect that has on the sound.
                Brian Rupnow
                Design engineer
                Barrie, Ontario, Canada

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                • #9
                  This engine will have the timing gears on the outside of the case. They will get their own polished brass??? cover. I haven't mounted the ignition points yet, but will probably set them up to be between the crankcase and the flywheel.
                  Brian Rupnow
                  Design engineer
                  Barrie, Ontario, Canada

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                  • #10
                    I love the vertical single designs -- reminds me of the classic BSA motorcycles. Simplicity is elegance.

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                    • #11
                      That's enough silliness for one day. Tomorrow I'll figure out a mounting plate for the ignition points and a gas tank.
                      Brian Rupnow
                      Design engineer
                      Barrie, Ontario, Canada

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                      • #12
                        The 'steel wool' muffler- is that like the glass pack of old? I remember people being so proud of having the glass packs. 283 with dual glass packs- had a great sound.

                        Steel wool- maybe consider a stainless steel scrubbie as the donor- just an idea. It wouldn't have the same potential as the steel wool though- probably won't shoot sparks
                        I seldom do anything within the scope of logical reason and calculated cost/benefit, etc- I'm following my passion-

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                        • #13
                          Darryl--Yes, I'm an old guy. In 1967 I had a 1960 Chev Impala with a hi-performance 283, a four speed stick shift-----and----glass-packs. Coolest car I ever had.
                          Brian Rupnow
                          Design engineer
                          Barrie, Ontario, Canada

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                          • #14
                            So, here we have it at 99% designed. An interesting little engine, with maybe a few shiny brass (gold??) parts just to set off the iron and aluminum cylinder and crank case. The crankshaft and the camshaft ride on sealed ball bearings, and the cams are inside the crankcase to guarantee splash oiling from the wet sump. For a little bit of added "pretty", I've designed a rather swoopy gas tank support.---After designing and building about a dozen of this type of engine, everything begins to look the same. I will run a Viton piston ring on this engine. Any comments are welcome.

                            Brian Rupnow
                            Design engineer
                            Barrie, Ontario, Canada

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                            • #15
                              Well, I know your comfortable with it, but loose that big gas cap!! Something more delicate!

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