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1" Bore x 1" Stroke Vertical i.c. Engine

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  • I just spoke to the technician at BusyBee and he said that the problem is 99% sure to be an "electronic board" that controls the motor. The board is only about $12.00, and he said that it should be quite simple to repair myself, so he is express shipping it up to me. Seeing that it is such a major undertaking to move my mill, I think this will be the best thing to do, and I can repair the mill "in place". Right now I'm suffering from terrible arthritis pain in my wrists, forearms, and hands, so if I take a break for a couple of days I won't feel terribly bad about it. I had an x-ray of both hands the day before yesterday, and am supposed to have a blood test on Monday. I've had minor arthritis for years, but nothing compared to this. Ironically, the mill broke down on the very last part for this new engine, the crankshaft.
    Brian Rupnow
    Design engineer
    Barrie, Ontario, Canada

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    • Sounds like your mill was feeling a bit cranky...

      I hope they are able to find a way to manage your arthritis. People I know have suffered a lot from it.
      Kansas City area

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      • Hope it get better for you, Brian. I've known too many who had the arthritis too.

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        • I'm, setting here typing with a wrist brace on both right and left arms. There seems to be some confusion whether my suffering is arthritis or carpal tunnel syndrome. I've had carpal tunnel issues before, but there was no pain or swelling involved, just numb and tingly fingers. Ultimately, the numbness and tingly fingers went away on it's own. My good wife, who always seems to know more than I do about most things, has declared that I am suffering from carpal tunnel syndrome. The doctor hasn't weighed in on this issue yet, and is waiting for me to have a blood test on Monday. I've only had these wrist braces on for about 4 hours today, and I must admit that my hands do feel better than the day before. I had to go to my local hardware store to buy some ice melting salt for my concrete steps, and while I was there, I looked at the color charts for Tremclad paint. The choice came down to either cyan (sky blue) or fire red, so I went with the red. I plan on painting the gas tank, gear cover, flywheel, and the rocker arms and rocker arm support tower. The rest of the engine will remain either aluminum color or brass color, with no painted finish. I think that the fan and it's support will be semi gloss black.----Brian
          Brian Rupnow
          Design engineer
          Barrie, Ontario, Canada

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          • Originally posted by brian Rupnow View Post
            . . . I looked at the color charts for Tremclad paint.
            That appears to be a Canada-only product. I wonder if it is rebranded Rustoleum.

            Allan Ostling

            Phoenix, Arizona

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            • You going to get it running before you paint it? It would be a shame to scratch it all up if you have to do any tweaking.

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              • I am so crippled up right now that I can't do anything except type. I won't paint it until I recover and complete the engine.
                Brian Rupnow
                Design engineer
                Barrie, Ontario, Canada

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                • Sorry to here that Arthur, as we call him out here, has showed up at your house. I should be able to help you with the mill. As you know I have the same machine and went round and round with Busy Bee when the RPM readout quit. I got real familiar with the inside of the electrical panel . If your machine is identical to mine, and it may not be as they change things from time to time, there is a 15 amp fuse located right in front of the AC line input on the bottom of the electrical panel. It is a black panel type fuse holder and the top should unscrew and the fuse should come out with it. Let me know how you make out and we can take it from there.
                  Larry - west coast of Canada

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                  • Cuttings--I did find the fuse on mine, and it was okay. I spoke to Daniel at head office in Concord, and he is shipping out a new electronics board that is located somewhere in the control panel where the start/stop pushbuttons are. My control panel has a finned heat-sink on the back. The one in my manual shows no heat sink, just a plain plate. When the electronics board gets here, I will change it out myself. If you have any pictures showing the inside of the control box, that would be a help to me.----Brian
                    Brian Rupnow
                    Design engineer
                    Barrie, Ontario, Canada

                    Comment


                    • Brian, I have the same heat sink On the back of my . I don't remember whether I took pictures in there or not but I will have a look this evening. If it is the circuit board that is located right inside the back/heat sink it is not too hard to get at. One other thing you can do when you have it open is check all the electrical connection you can access to see if they are tight. I found a few that were a bit loose. If my memory serves me right they are mostly set screw type connections where you push a wire in a hole and tighten a set screw on top of it.
                      I just thought of one other thing you should check. That is the chip guard limit switch on the front of the machine. I believe you took the plexiglass guard off, but he switch should still be there. If the shaft that actuates it has rotated the machine won't run. I am going to look for pictures.
                      Larry - west coast of Canada

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                      • Back again. I don't have any pictures of inside of electrical panel, but I could easily pop the covers off and take some if it comes to that. I have a spare speed control circuit board here and all the connections to that are push on flat connectors. They can sometimes work loose and a little squeeze with a pair of pliers then push them back in place will correct that. Thinking back now, I think the screw type connections are on the magnetic switch which is located just inside the front panel. Anyway once you open it up you will see what I am talking about. Good luck and I will check back in the morning. About the same time as your mid morning coffee break.
                        Larry - west coast of Canada

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                        • I've sat around the house with wrist braces on and done nothing for three or four days and I'm going crazy!!! I really wasn't happy with the cooling fan I had made from an old pitted piece of 0.050" thick plate. The process worked fine, but the pitted material looked awful. This afternoon I snooped around in by boxes of cut-offs, and found a 2" diameter piece of 316 stainless steel, just long enough to grip in my chuck jaws and turn to 1 3/4" outer diameter. I had enough material to make a fan blade 0.060" thick with a 1/8" thick x 1/2" diameter hub on it. I will investigate cutting the slots with a cut-off saw to give the sides of the blades a little smoother finish than a band-saw cut. Does anyone know if this material takes silver solder okay?
                          Brian Rupnow
                          Design engineer
                          Barrie, Ontario, Canada

                          Comment


                          • Instead of risking your healing hands, read a shop-related book. I recommend "Toilers of the Sea," by Victor Hugo. This will appeal to anyone who has faced moving a heavy lathe or mill. Actually, it is a sea story, but it is about salvaging a valuable fishing boat which has become jammed between pinnacle rocks off the windward coast of Guernsey. The protagonist, a reclusive fisherman, performs great feats of engineering single-handed, with the goal of winning the hand of a shipowner's daughter.

                            Being monolingual I could not read it in the author's French, but the translation by James Hogarth is wonderful.
                            Allan Ostling

                            Phoenix, Arizona

                            Comment


                            • About the silver solder, I'm not sure about that. Many years ago, one reader asked the AWS Journal about his job of brazing SS. The editors replied that plain copper would braze stainless better then anything. Did some experiments and it turns out they were right. If I had to do that, I would for sure use TIG to provide the heat, since it also provides a nice shielding gas blanket.

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                              • It should silver solder just fine.
                                what series stainless is it?
                                I’m assuming 303??

                                Sid

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